Friday, August 1, 2008

Final Project

Well we've come to the end of the semester. Please post your Final Project below and if you have time also post it to the wiki: http://wikidave.wikispaces.com/Final+Projects this way you will have your original draft locked into our blog and future participants will be able to add to, and improve upon, your project in the wiki. Your Final Projects will perpetually evolve, forever improving, changing, and growing.

It was a pleasure working with all of you.

Good luck, and as always, feel free to contact me if you ever have any questions.


Professionally Yours,


Dave Fontaine

Internet Librarian

National Board Certified Teacher

Educational Consultant

DaveFontaine1@gmail.com

http://professionaldevelopmentcredit.com/

9 comments:

jack'sblog said...

EDC 921
Deliverable #4: Eight-week instructional unit on Kurt Vonnegut’s Player Piano
Jack Caswell

Central question: How can civilization develop and use technology in a way that benefits society and promotes progress while preserving the dignity of mankind?

Unit Objectives:

 Students will read, discuss, understand, and write about the relevant themes of Kurt Vonnegut’s Player Piano.
 Students will make connections between those themes, their lives, contemporary society, and other literary works.
 Students will understand appropriate content and protocol when using the class blog and wiki, and also understand the ramifications of violating that protocol.
 Students will learn how to log into and post written entries such as journals and reactions to other theme-related writing prompts on the class Weblog (blog).
 Students will post appropriate and constructive comments to their classmates’ entries on the class blog.
 Students will learn how to log into and post vocabulary entries for a word bank on the class wiki.
 Students will research the history and development of a modern technological device that has displaced manpower in the labor market.
 Students will understand what constitutes plagiarism, and how to avoid it.
 Students will write about their research on a technological device and post their expository essays on the class wiki.
 Students will complete a 7-10 minute oral presentation on their research projects.
 Students will create visual aids to augment their oral presentations.
 Students will use power point, podcasts, and/or videocasts to augment their oral presentations.
 Students will know the origins of the Luddites and understand the significance of machinery and technology in society, specifically in relation to the labor force.
 Students will understand Vonnegut’s use of satire, and the elements of satire including: exaggeration, irony, understatement, and parody.
 Students will successfully complete vocabulary and reading check quizzes.
 Students will write a 3-5 page persuasive essay that attempts to answer the central question posted above using evidence from their research, quotes or excerpts from Player Piano or other relevant publications, and classroom discussions as evidence to support their theses.
 Students will learn, review, get reinforced on and properly apply in their journals and essays the following grammatical usage skills:
• accurate identification of subject, verb, and subject-verb agreement
• accurate identification of compound, complex, and compound-complex sentences
• proper punctuation of compound, complex, and compound-complex sentences
• proper capitalization

Ramp-up Activities:
Before reading and studying Player Piano students will do a brief pre-reading and discussion on the Luddites of Great Britain’s Industrial Age to acclimate them to the often precarious relationships among machines, technology, the labor force, and society. Students will also do some brief reading on the player piano instrument, and a visual aid will accompany the reading and classroom discussion. Students will be asked to brainstorm different technological devices that have replaced manpower in the labor market, for instance, the automatic checkout at supermarkets and other retail outlets.
As a pre-reading activity, the class will discuss satire – what it is, how it is used, and its typical targets and purposes. I will define satire for them and introduce to them the elements of satire, exaggeration, irony, understatement, and parody. We will then brainstorm examples of satire in the modern media, including television shows such as South Park, Mad Magazine, and editorial cartoons. As a homework assignment, I will ask them to bring in an example of satire that they found in a newspaper, magazine, etc. and then identify the element(s) used and the satirist’s specific target.
Students will also be assigned passwords and learn how to log onto and use both the class blog and wiki.

Culminating projects:

1. Students will create a word bank on the class wiki. Each student will be responsible for at least 20 words on the class wiki. This will count as a quiz grade (10% of quarterly grade). All students will have to post their words alphabetically, include their parts of speech, definitions, any synonyms, and use them in a sentence. All of that information will be posted to the wiki. I will give at least two other vocabulary quizzes, each counting 10% of quarter grade, on words from the word bank that I choose as we progress through the unit. (Assignment and rubric attached)
2. Students will write an expository essay on the development of a technological device of their choosing. Students will cite their sources for the information using the MLA style guide. Students will post their essays on the class wiki for 20% of their quarter grade. (Assignment and rubric attached)
3. Students will give an oral presentation, using power point, podcasts, and/or videocasts, or other forms of visual aid to augment and enhance their presentations for 15% of their quarter grade.
3. Students will write a persuasive essay on the class blog that attempts to the answer the central question: How can civilization develop and use technology in a way that benefits society and promotes progress while preserving the dignity of mankind? (Assignment and rubric attached.) This is 35% of quarter grade.










Weekly Itinerary for Player Piano Unit (Note: This is subject to change according to the vicissitudes of unpredictable school life and life in general.)

WEEK ONE:
Day One:
Objectives: Students will learn about the historical Luddites and understand the relationship between technological development and manual labor in the work force. Students will understand the Luddites relevance to themes in Player Piano.
Students will understand what the player piano instrument is and its symbolic title. Students will understand Kurt Vonnegut’s historical status in the literary canon. Students will understand the fictional boundaries of Ilium and their relevance to the novel. Day Two:
Objectives: Students will learn how to use their teacher assigned passwords to log onto and post entries on the class Weblog (blog). Students will post their first journal entry on the class blog.
Journal entry for blog: What do you think Paul Proteus’ inner conflict is? What makes you conclude this? Provide evidence from the text to support your response.
Students will discuss central characters and understand their possible motives for behavior. Students will discuss and understand relationship between war and technological developments. Day Three:
Objectives: Students will learn how to log into and post written entries on class wikis using same coded passwords as class blog.
Students will find unfamiliar vocabulary words from Chapters 1 and 2 from the text and enter them into the word bank on the class wiki. Students will include: the definition for each word, its part-of-speech in parentheses (n., adj., adv. etc.), any synonyms that might apply, and use that word in a sentence. Students will post each word, in alphabetical order, on the class wiki. Day Four:
Objectives: Students will write in journal on class blog in response to prompt: What advantages do machines have over people and vice versa? Provide examples to support your points. Students will orally review and discuss Chapter 1, PP. Students will be introduced to and understand the definition of satire, its modern uses, and elements of satire (exaggeration, irony, understatement, parody).
Homework: find an example of satire in an editorial cartoon. Be prepared to discuss its elements in class. Day Five:
Objectives: Students will present in front of the class their satire homework with Q& A discussion.
Students will participate in teacher guided oral reading of Chapter 2, PP, with emphasis on Shah of Bratpuhr’s satirical role, his use of “takaru” (slave) and why. Students will discuss the “Reeks and the Wrecks”
Homework: Log in to class blog and comment on at least three classmates’ blog journal entries.
Read and be prepared for a reading quiz on Monday for Chapters 3 and 4, PP.

WEEK TWO:
Day One:
Objectives: Students will write in journal on class blog: Briefly explain how the player piano could symbolize one or more themes of the novel. Also, is Paul and Anita’s marriage in anyway mechanical? Why or why not?
Students will learn and understand: subject-verb, and subject verb agreement. Practice and reinforcement exercises. Homework: Edit blog entry for subject-verb agreement and other grammatical errors. Read Chapters 5 & 6, PP. Day Two:
Objectives: Students will get practice and reinforcement on subject-verb agreement. Students will take reading check quiz on Chapters 5 & 6.
Students will orally discuss and understand Chapters 5 & 6 with focus on father-son relationship with Paul Proteus, his father, and Kroner, as well as “Checker Charley,” and Vonnegut’s anticipation of IBM’s Big Blue chess master. Homework: Add two vocabulary words to word bank from Chapters 5 & 6. Skip Chapter 7; read Chapters 8 & 9. Day Three:
Objectives:
Students will write in journal entry for class blog: Using Vonnegut’s Bud Calhoun as a reference, what do you think is essential to people’s happiness? Explain. Students will orally discuss their journal entries, the effects of machines and technology on society as depicted in Homestead, and Reverend Lasher’s comments regarding class warfare (Marxism).
Students will be introduced to and understand the independent clause, compound sentence and correct punctuation of. Homework: Read Chapters 9-11. Day Four:
Objectives: Students will review: subject, verb, conjunction, and independent clauses. Practice writing and properly punctuating compound sentences, and orally discuss Chapters 9-11 with emphasis on marital and possible extra-marital relationships taking place in novel, and Ch 11 satire on Shah and POTUS (President of the United States). Homework: Add two words to wiki from Ch’s 9-11; read Ch’s 12 and 14; skip Chapter 13. Be prepared for grammar usage quiz. Day Five:
Objectives: Students will take grammar usage quiz on subject, verb, subject-verb agreement, independent clauses, compound sentences, and punctuation of.
Journal entries on class blog: What is appealing to Paul about the farmhouse and why does Finnerty cite the conversation between Thoreau and Emerson at the jail house? What is the significance of it? Students will orally discuss journal entries.
Homework: Read Chapters 15-18. Be prepared for wiki word bank quiz. Add two words from your homework reading to the class wiki word bank.




Week Three:
Day One:
Objectives: Students will complete reading check quiz on Chapters 15-18. Students will discuss Mr. Haycox, Edgar R.B. Hagstrohm and his wife Wanda, her attitude toward his extra-marital affair, and the origins and nature of Paul and Anita’s relationship and marriage.
Students will write in their journal entry on class blog: Based on your reading and discussion about Hagstrohm and Wanda’s and Paul and Anita’s marriages, how would you counsel them if you were a marriage counselor and you wanted them to avoid a divorce? Homework: Read Chapters 19 and 20; study 20 teacher-assigned words Day Two:
Objectives:
Students will write for journal entry on class blog: What does the barber’s monologue say about the relationship between technology and mankind/society? How does control over the information for public consumption play a role in “conventional wisdom” or commonly accepted “facts?”
Class discussion of journal and Halyard’s predicament.
For homework: Read Chapter 21; be prepared to write about Joe Averageman and the prosecuting attorney’s cases in the allegorical play that is staged at the Meadows convention, and what is symbolic about the Native American at the bonfire? Study for word bank quiz. Day Three:
Objectives: Students will complete wiki word bank quiz: 20 words. Students will write entries on journal entry for class blog: Discuss the merits of both Joe Averageman’s and his prosecuting attorney’s arguments in favor of or against technology and progress. With whom do you agree and why?
What is symbolic about the Native American’s presence at the bonfire?
Students will review independent clauses. Students will become familiar with subordinating conjunctions and subordinate clauses. Homework: Read Chapters 22-23. Add two words to the word bank on the class wiki. Day Four:
Objectives: Students will get practice and reinforcement on identifying, writing, and properly punctuating complex sentences (those containing subordinate clauses).
Students will discuss Paul’s becoming a spy for Ilium and the introduction of the Ghost Shirt Society and its plan for the destruction and/or takeover of the country.
Will it ever come to this in our society? Why or why not? Homework: Be prepared for usage quiz on proper identification, construction, and punctuation of both compound and complex sentences. Read Chapters 24-25. Add two words to wiki word bank. Day Five:
Objectives: Students will complete quiz on identifying, constructing and properly punctuating both compound and complex sentences.
Students will understand procedure and objectives of research and writing (for class wiki) assignment on a technological device (assignment and rubric attached at end). Students will ask questions to clarify wiki writing assignment, their responsibilities, and the due date. h topics.
Read aloud: Chapter 26. For homework: Read Chapters 27-29. Be prepared for reading check quiz. Add two words to wiki word bank




Week Four:
Day One:
Objectives: Students will complete reading check quiz on Chapters 27-29, write journal entry: If a battle loomed in our society between a group like the Ghost Shirt Society and the aristocratic establishment, which side would you want to prevail (win) and why?
Students will discuss their journal entries. Students and teacher will read aloud: Chapter 30, with discussion of quote: “…the condition of man improves in direct ratio to the energy and devices for using energy put at his disposal.” Homework: Read Chapters 31 & 32; add two words to wiki word bank. Study 20 teacher assigned words from wiki word bank. Day Two:
Objectives: Students will select research topics and get approval from teacher. Students will write in journal entry: Do you agree with prosecutor’s assertion that Paul’s hatred of society is merely a symptom of Paul’s hatred for his father? Given Paul’s stated reason for marrying Anita and their lack of a child, what do you think Vonnegut is trying to say about parent-offspring relationships and why? Homework: Read Chapter 33 and 34. Add two words to the wiki word bank.
Day Three:
Objectives: Students will write in journal entry: How and why does Vonnegut use satire in Chapter 33? Who or what are his targets and what is he trying to say about society and/or human nature? What satirical devices does he use?
Students will discuss journal entries and react to quote: “The most fascinating game there is, keeping things from staying where they are?” What does the speaker mean? Do you agree or disagree? Why?
Read aloud: Chapter 35; discuss the ironic ending and the type of irony.
Homework: Add two words to wiki word bank. Study for wiki word bank quiz Day Four:
Objectives:
Students will become familiar with MLA style guide. Students will read, review and practice teacher selected and highlighted sections of style guide. Students will know how to properly document books, encyclopedias, dictionaries, periodicals, Internet web sites, compact discs, and dvd’s. Homework: study for wiki word bank quiz. Day Five:
Objectives:
Students will complete vocabulary quiz: wiki word bank (20 words)
Students will receive more review and complete practice quiz on MLA style guide. Students will learn good note-taking and organizing habits using index cards. Students will review and get reinforcement on proper documentation of multi-media sources.
Week Five:
Day One:
Objectives:
Students will review, question and clarify specifications in MLA style guide. Students will understand what plagiarism is and how to avoid it. Students will complete practice quiz on examples of plagiarism. Day Two:
Objectives:
Students will use multi-media resources in the school library to research and take notes on technological device for their wiki writing assignment. Homework: Organize notes and conduct more research as needed. Day Three:
Objectives:
Students will use multi-media resources in school library to research and take notes on technological device for wiki writing assignment. Homework: Organize notes and conduct more research as needed. Day Four:
Objectives:
Students will receive instruction, with overhead projector as a visual aid, on the structure of an expository essay, including introduction of topic, body, and conclusion paragraphs. Homework: Conduct more research and organize notes as needed. Day Five:
Objectives:
Students will outline and begin rough drafting essays. Homework: Complete rough drafts for peer editing at beginning of following week.

Week Six:
Day One:
Objectives:
Students will learn and understand the peer-editing process. Students will group in pairs to peer edit using peer-editing checklist. Homework: Revise for submission and posting on wiki at the end of the week.
Day Two:
Objectives:
Students will participate in Socratic Seminar that attempts to answer instructional unit’s central question: How can civilization develop and use technology in a way that benefits society and promotes progress while preserving the dignity of mankind? Homework: Prepare for oral presentation. Day Three:
Objectives: Students will prepare for oral presentation element of their wiki research project by working on notes and/or visual aids. Homework: Prepare wiki writing assignment final draft for submission at end of the week. Day Four:
Objectives:
Students will work on either their oral presentations or written assignments for their wiki writing project. Homework: Have completed writing assignment ready on flash (thumb) drive or 3.5 floppy disc for transferring and posting to class wiki. Day Five:
Objectives:
Students will post their wiki writing projects on the class wiki. Students will receive instruction on overhead for persuasive essays to be written on class blog. Students will prepare their oral presentations for next week.
Week Seven:
Day One:
Objectives:
Students will give oral presentations on their wiki research projects while using power point, podcasts, videocasts, and/or traditional visual aids to augment and enhance their presentations. Classmates will listen attentively, ask questions, and provide constructive feedback/criticism for the presenters. Day Two:
Objectives:
Students will give oral presentations on their wiki research projects while using power point, podcasts, videocasts, and/or traditional visual aids to augment and enhance their presentations. Classmates will listen attentively, ask questions, and provide constructive feedback/criticism for the presenters. Day Three:
Objectives:
Students will give oral presentations on their wiki research projects while using power point, podcasts, videocasts, and/or traditional visual aids to augment and enhance their presentations. Classmates will listen attentively, ask questions, and provide constructive feedback/ criticism for the presenters.
Students will receive assignment and rubric for persuasive writing essay. Students will ask questions to clarify specifics of assignment and their responsibilities. Day Four:
Objectives:
Students will receive instruction on the structure of the persuasive essay, including hook in the introductory paragraph, bridge to thesis, and thesis statement. Homework: Students will write introductory paragraph including above three elements with thesis statement attempting to answer the instructional unit’s central question: How can civilization develop and use technology in a way that benefits society and promotes progress while preserving the dignity of mankind? Day Five:
Objectives:
Students will be instructed on and understand transition sentences and thesis supporting body paragraphs, as well as conclusion paragraph. Students will brainstorm support for their theses using excerpts from Player Piano, notes from wiki research project, class discussion, and/or any other pertinent research as evidence to support their arguments.
Homework: Gather and organize notes for persuasive essay. Outline persuasive essay.







Week Eight:
Day One:
Objectives:
Students will write rough drafts of persuasive essay. Homework: Students will finish rough drafts. Day Two:
Objectives:
Students will get in groups of two to peer-edit rough drafts using peer editing guidelines and focusing on subject-verb agreement as well as proper punctuation of compound and complex sentences. Day Three:
Objectives:
Students will make revisions to their rough drafts according to peer-editor’s suggestions and their own review.
Homework: Students will write final drafts and save to either flash drive or 3.5 floppy disc for transfer and posting to class blog. Day Four:
Objectives:
Students will post their persuasive essays to the class blog. Day Five:
Objectives:
Students will offer criticism and feedback to teacher on the novel and the instructional unit, including their use of wiki, blog and other Web 2.0 technology. Students will prepare for next instructional unit.


Note: Assignments and Rubrics on following pages.
























Assignments and Rubrics

Wiki Word Bank Assignment:
Each student will be responsible for entering 20 words, complete with their definitions, parts-of-speech, any synonyms and inclusion in a student-generated sentence for the wiki word bank. Successful completion of this assignment is 10% of quarterly grade.
Each student will complete at least two vocabulary quizzes of 20 words each. Each of the quizzes will also count as 10% of quarter grade.

Wiki Writing Assignment:
Each student will research and write about one technological device (such as an ATM machine, automated supermarket check-out machine, etc.) that may have displaced manpower in the labor force. All essays will include an introductory paragraph, at least three body paragraphs, and a conclusion. The three body paragraphs should each highlight a major development and/or breakthrough (when first invented, when and how developed, when first mass marketed, etc.).
The conclusion paragraph should include information regarding the device’s impact on the labor force. This will count as 20% of quarter grade. (Rubric to follow.)

Wiki Research Oral Presentation:
Each student will give a 5-7 minute oral presentation on their wiki research topic. All presentations will be accompanied by a visual aid such as a power point, videocast, or poster board. A podcast is acceptable in lieu of the oral presentation, but presenter must display visual aid at the front of the class. This will count 15% of quarter grade.(Rubric to follow.)

Weblog Persuasive Writing Assignment:
Each student will complete a persuasive essay of at least five paragraphs and including an introductory paragraph with a hook, bridge to thesis and clearly constructed thesis statement, transition sentences, at least three body paragraphs that include arguments in support of your thesis and evidence to support your arguments in the form of excerpts from Player Piano, notes from your wiki research assignment, class discussion, and/or any other pertinent resources. The thesis statement must attempt to answer the instructional unit’s central question: How can civilization develop and use technology in a way that benefits society and promotes progress while preserving the dignity of mankind? A conclusion paragraph must be included. This will count 35% of quarter grade. (Rubric to follow.)

Note: Rubrics on following pages.










Oral Presentation Rubric: (10-12 pts.=4, 7-9 pts.=3, 4-6pts.=2, 1-3 pts=1)
4: Exceeds 3: Meets 2: Nearly Meets 1: Deficient
Delivery: Speaker stands with upright posture, demonstrates enthusiasm about topic, completes speech within 5-7 minute time frame. Speaker stands with upright posture, demonstrates interest in topic and completes speech within 5-7 minute time frame. Speaker sometimes slouches or otherwise demonstrates lack of enthusiasm or interest. Speech is completed just short of 5-7 minute time frame. Speaker consistently slouches and shows lack of interest or knowledge about topic. Speech is completed far short of 5-7 minute time frame.
Speech: Speaker speaks clearly, audibly, and with enthusiasm. Speaker effectively varies pitch and tone of voice for emphasis. Speaker maintains eye contact with entire audience throughout speech. Speech is fluent (no “Uhm’s and Er’s), and speaker uses mature and grammatically correct diction. Speaker mostly speaks clearly, audibly, and with interest in topic. Speaker sometimes varies pitch and tone of voice. Speaker maintains eye contact most of the time. Speech is mostly fluent, and speaker’s diction mostly is age appropriate and grammatically correct. Speaker sometimes speaks inaudibly and/or unclearly. Speech is delivered in monotone. Speaker fails to maintain consistent eye contact. Speech is not fluent, and/or speaker’s diction may be either age inappropriate or frequently incorrect grammatically. Speaker consistently speaks inaudibly and unclearly. Speech is delivered in monotone and speaker does not maintain any eye contact. Speech is not fluent, and diction is consistently age inappropriate or grammatically incorrect.
Visual/Technological Aid Speaker uses original power point or videocast that is colorful, full of details, and informative. All text is grammatically correct. Poster board visual is detailed, informative, attractive in appearance, and text is grammatically correct. Visual has some detail, is somewhat informative and attractive, and may contain grammatical errors in text. Visual lacks detail and/or pertinent information and/or is unattractive, and/or contains several grammatical errors in text.
Expository Essay Rubric: 15-16 pts.=4, 10-14pts.==3, 7-9 pts.=2, 1-6pts.=1
4: Exceeds 3: Meets 2: Nearly Meets 1: Deficient
Awareness of voice, purpose, audience Essay captures reader’s attention while introducing a topic and establishing a context. Essay is written in mature and captivating diction. Essay introduces a topic, but may fail to capture the reader’s attention. Essay establishes a context, and is mostly written in mature diction. Essay may not properly introduce a topic and/or fails to grab the reader’s attention, and/or establish a context and/or be written in mature or age appropriate diction. Essay fails to introduce a topic and/or establish a context, and it is written in age or otherwise inappropriate diction.
Content Essay is clearly structured with introduction, body and conclusion paragraphs. Essay contains more than three examples to support topic. Essay uses documented evidence in correct MLA format to support all assertions in body of paragraphs. Essay is clearly structured with introduction, body and conclusion paragraphs. Essay contains at least three examples to support topic. Essay uses documented evidence in correct MLA format to support all assertions in body paragraphs. Essay may not be clearly structured, and/or contains less than three arguments to support topic, and/or evidence may be either missing or incorrectly documented according to MLA format. Essay fails to demonstrate any knowledge of structure, and/or fails to use supporting evidence for topic, and/or fails to document any evidence according to MLA format.
Cohesion, Coherence Essay is written in a clear, flowing manner that is easily understood. Essay uses proper transition where needed. Essay is mostly written in a clear, flowing manner that is easily understood. Essay mostly uses transition sentences where needed. Essay may be difficult to follow or comprehend in parts. Essay fails to use transition sentences where needed. Essay is incoherent and has no flow.
Grammatical Conventions Essay shows mastery of grammatical conventions. Essay shows control of grammatical conventions. Essay shows some control of grammatical conventions Essay shows little to no control of conventions.

Persuasive Essay Rubric: 15-16 pts.=4, 10-14pts.=3, 7-9pts.=2, 1-6pts.=1
Expectations and Standards Exceeds Standard
4 Meets Standard
3 Nearly Meets
Standard
2 Below Standards
1 Little or No Evidence
0
Develops a controlling idea Thesis conveys an insightful perspective and addresses the prompt. Skillfully uses facts, quotes and other authoritative evidence to support thesis. Thesis conveys a clear and knowledgeable perspective on the subject and addresses the prompt. Effectively uses a variety of authoritative evidence to support thesis. Thesis attempts to convey a perspective on the subject and attempts to address the prompt. Attempts to include a variety of authoritative evidence for support. Thesis conveys an unclear or inconsistent understanding of the subject or fails to address the prompt. Evidence fails to persuade or meet the demand of the prompt. Thesis missing or fails to develop a controlling idea or address the prompt.
Engages reader by using a variety of strategies Skillfully captures and maintains readers’ attention and understanding. Effectively captures and maintains readers’ attention and understanding. May not capture or hold readers’ attention and understanding Neither captures nor holds readers’ attention or understanding. No attempt to capture or hold readers’ attention or understanding.
Creates an organizing structure The writer skillfully organizes the essay from intro to conclusion, uses transition sentences, and purpose, audience and context are skillfully addressed. Writing is clearly organized from intro to conclusion. Writer uses transition sentences, and purpose, audience and context are effectively addressed. Response is not clearly organized throughout. Transition sentences are unclear, and purpose, audience, and context are not successfully addressed. The response is not clearly organized. Most components are ineffective. Purpose, context, and audience are not addressed. Response is incoherent. Most or all of the components are ineffective or missing. Purpose, context and audience are not addressed.

Brooke said...

I am sorry that the formatting didn't translate well. Please check the wiki, to view it better. Thanks everyone. I appreciated everyone's ideas and insight.
Brooke


Lesson Title: Intro to RICBA and Rooster Games Date: Sept. 2008

Level of instruction: 5th grade
Time: 40 min.

Organization of instruction:
Introduction: The purpose of this first lesson is to introduce the children to the big fifth grade reading incentive program called the Rooster Games. Several years ago the Gordon School created the games as a way to get children excited about the Rhode Island Children’s Book Award Nominees. Students around the state who read 3 or more of the RICBA books can vote for their favorite to receive the award. We participate in the Rooster Games with the Lincoln School. The children are required to read or listen to 10 of the twenty books in order to participate. We divide the children into color teams which consist of students from both schools. On the day of the event these teams tackle a variety of challenges; everything from matching the title and first line of all 20 books, to deciding which object represents which book. This year, in this introductory lesson I will show the students the Rooster Games blog that I will create and preview some of the activities we will include on this blog.
******************************************************************************

What is the Rhode Island Children’s Book Award?
• How are the books chosen?
• Voting.
Introduce Rooster Games
• Way to get students excited about RICBA
• Participate with Lincoln School
• Have to read or listen to 10 books.
• How we will support students to get to the goal of 10 books by reading books over lunchtime, reading during class, providing audio books, and allowing parents to read them books.
Project Rooster Games blog and briefly introduce.
• Show where information about the Rooster Games located.
• Show annotated list of books
• Show page where they will post their essays and comment of their classmates work. Explain that once they have each read 3 books on the list we will begin to add book reviews to the blog.
• Students may be anxious about this project, just mention that more details will follow and that the work will be done in school
Handout annotated bookmarks.
Book talk 3-5 books on the list.
Time to check out books at the end of lesson.

Specific Learner Objectives:
Understand the relationship between the Rhode Island Children’s Book Award and the Rooster Games.
Begin to generate excitement about the books
Each student checks out one RICBA book.
Extension and Adaptation

Hamilton Students may be anxious about reading 10 books. Reiterate that for the past 6 years all students have reached this goal and how we will support them.
Leave plenty of time for questions.
I will talk to the Hamilton Teacher first to decide if I even mention the writing assignment at this time to prevent worry.
Materials:

RICBA Bookmarks
LCD projector/computer to show blog.
Pencils so students can mark books they are interested in.
Evaluation / Assessment:

Students engaged and participating in brainstorm.
Each student leaves with one book on the list about which they are excited.
Notes on Lesson:


Follow-up Assignment:

Meet again in 2 weeks to discuss how to use a blog and how to participate in a courteous and safe manner.
AASL Standards Met 4.1.1 Read, view, and listen for pleasure and personal growth. 4.1.2 Read widely and fluently to make connections with self, the world, and previous reading. 4.1.3 Respond to literature and creative expressions of ideas in various formats and genres. 4.2.4 Show an appreciation for literature by electing to read for pleasure and expressing an interest in various literary genres. 4.4.1 Identify own areas of interest. 4.4.3 Recognize how to focus efforts in personal learning


Lesson Title: Internet and blog safety Date: Oct. 2008

Level of instruction: 5th grade
Time: 40 min.

Organization of instruction:
Introduction: The students have been reading books on the RICBA list. The classroom teacher will soon introduce the criteria for their book review. We will spend the next two library classes talking about blogs and online safety. Ultimately the goal is to create an acceptable use contract for how the students will behave when they use the blog. Before this class the classroom teacher and I will send a letter home to parents explaining the purpose of the blog and how we plan to use it in our class. The letter will include an explanation of how we will discuss safety issues with the children during this class. We will allow parents to choose not to have their children’s work posted on the blog if they do not want them to. If any parent chooses this option we will have that student’s classmates comment on their work in written form instead.
******************************************************************************

What did we talk about the last time you were here?
How is the reading going?
Anyone want to suggest to their classmates in 60 sec. or less?

Today we are going to talk about our upcoming assignment.
You will be writing a book review of a RICBA of your choice and posting it to our Rooster Games Blog.
You still have a couple of weeks left to read but today we will be discussing how to use a blog and how to be safe while doing so. We will spend time talking about the features of a blog and by the end of our next class we will create our classroom rules for blogging.

First of all:
Raise your hand if you have ever used a blog?
Many of you may be wondering what is a blog.
What is a blog and how is it different from other websites? Turn and talk to your neighbor for 1 min.
Record students’ ideas.
Project the Rooster Games blog and show different features.
• Where detailed information about the event.
• Annotated list of books
• Page where their essays will be posted with an example loaded.
• Explain that the librarians and teachers will be the only ones creating posts.
• Show students where they will comment on their peers’ work.

Now that we have looked at the blog what else do we know about blogs? Turn and talk at tables 2 min.
Record student responses by randomly choosing someone at each table to share an idea. Because of the turn and talk everyone should have something to share. This applies throughout the lesson.
Anyone can view this blog but only you will be able to post comments.
If anyone with an internet connection can view this blog and therefore your essays, what must we keep in mind while writing our book reviews? Turn and talk 2 min
Record student comments.
When we write online we also need to be careful about what kinds of information we write about ourselves. When I post your essays and when you comment about your classmates’ work I want you to only identify yourself by your initials. Do not include your last name or even which class you are in.

As I said before you will be responsible for commenting on your classmates, essay on this blog. In a couple of weeks we will talk more in-depth about the content you need to include in your comments. For the last ten minutes of this class I want you to brainstorm what you think would be a good rule to have about how you comment. We have already established one. Anyone remember what it is?
Use your initials when you sign your posts
Who can give us another example of what might be a good rule? Let’s phrase the rule in terms of what “to do” as opposed to what “not to do”
Record these two rules to add to during the next class.
Excellent. You have 10 minutes to brainstorm and record your ideas. The next time you are here we will create a list of rules that we will agree to follow every time we post something to the blog.
Collect brainstorm lists. As students leave comment on hard and well they worked. Remind them that the next time they will report back what they came up with and from there we will create a final list of rules.

Specific Learner Objectives:
Understand importance of being safe online.
Understand what they post online impacts their safety.
Understand the impact their words can have on others online and the need to be polite and kind when responding to others ideas.
Generate ideas for creating rules.
Demonstrate ownership of the rules for posting online

Extension and Adaptation

Allow additional time to turn and talk when needed. It is essential that all of the students are seriously considering and reflecting upon the questions I pose.
Materials:

LCD projector/computer to show blog.
Pencils and paper so students can record ideas during brainstorms.
Evaluation / Assessment:

Students engaged and participating in brainstorm.
Students sharing serious, applicable ideas.

Notes on Lesson:

Where we stop in this lesson depends on the discussion. Students take the conversation in directions that I hadn’t thought of before hand. The important thing is that they think about how they will share their ideas on the blog in a safe and kind manner.

Follow-up Assignment:

• After I read through their brainstorm lists I will create follow-up discussion questions to ask of students to elicit rules that I think the students might miss.
• The classroom teacher will present the rubric for the book review. Students will complete their reviews during language arts time in their classrooms and at home.
AASL Standards Met 1.1.2 Use prior and background knowledge as context for new learning. 1.1.9 Collaborate with others to broaden and deepen understanding. 1.3.4 Contribute to the exchange of ideas within the learning community. 1.3.5 Use information technology responsibly 2.1.5 Collaborate with others to exchange ideas, develop new understandings, make decisions, and solve problems. 3.1.2 Participate and collaborate as members of a social and intellectual network of learners. 3.1.3 Use writing and speaking skills to communicate new understandings effectively. 3.1.4 Use technology and other information tools to organize and display knowledge and understanding in ways that others can view, use, and assess. 3.2.1 Demonstrate leadership and confidence by presenting ideas to others in both formal and informal situations. 3.2.2 Show social responsibility by participating actively with others in learning situations and by contributing questions and ideas during group discussions. 3.2.3 Demonstrate teamwork by working productively with others. 3.3.5 Contribute to the exchange of ideas within and beyond the learning community. 3.4.1 Assess the processes by which learning was achieved in order to revise strategies and learn more effectively in the future. 3.4.3 Assess own ability to work with others in a group setting by evaluating varied roles, leadership, and demonstrations of respect for other viewpoints. 4.3.1 Participate in the social exchange of ideas, both electronically and in person. 4.3.4 Practice safe and ethical behaviors in personal electronic communication and interaction. 4.4.2 Recognize the limits of own personal knowledge.


Lesson Title: Internet and blog safety #2 Date: Oct. 2008

Level of instruction: 5th grade
Time: 40 min.

Organization of instruction:
Introduction: This is a continuation of last week’s lesson. The students are currently writing their persuasive essays under the guidance of their classroom teachers. The primary goal of this lesson is for us to create rules for how students will comment online. We will discuss the content of their comments in the next lesson.
******************************************************************************

What did we talk about the last time you were here?
Where did we end last time?
Who can tell us what our goal is today?
Create rules for how we comment on our classmates’ work online.

Students will work with the same groups they worked with in the previous class.

Take the next 10 minutes to review your brainstorm list and add any additional ideas you have had over the last week. When you are done, mark your 3 best rules.

Classroom teacher and I will wander and see what the groups have come up with.

Have each table report back their best rule (they have three in case some other group mentions a rule first)

Record on list from previous class.
Are there any rules we missed?
Once all ideas are listed, ask questions that elicit any rules that we feel the kids have missed.

If the list contains lots of rules that are fairly similar, print out list and have students in their groups color code the rules by like ideas and then name the categories.
Together we have created our list for how to comment online on our blog. It is a work in progress. If we think of additional rules as we go we will add them to this list. For now though, can you all agree to commit to following these rules when you post a comment on our blog? I will call each table up to the front of the classroom to sign your name signifying that you agree to follow these rules.

The next time you come to the library we will talk about the content you include when responding to your peers’ essays.

Review and reflect on the process of developing our criteria with the students.

Allow time at the end of class for children to recommend books from the RICBA list to their classmates.
Allow 5 minutes for them to checkout another RICBA book.

Specific Learner Objectives:
Generate ideas for creating rules.
Demonstrate ownership of the rules for posting online
Create a contract for how to post to our blog.
Extension and Adaptation

Allow additional time to turn and talk when needed. It is essential that all of the students are seriously considering and reflecting upon the questions I pose.
Materials:

LCD projector/computer to show blog.
Pencils and paper so students can record ideas during brainstorms.
Evaluation / Assessment:

Students engaged and participating in brainstorm.
Students sharing serious, applicable ideas.
As a class we create a thoughtful manageable list of rules that everyone can agree to follow.

Notes on Lesson:

Follow-up Assignment:

• Students will complete book reviews.
• I will assist teachers in posting finished reviews to the blog.
• Next class we will model how to post a comment to the blog.
AASL Standards Met 1.1.2 Use prior and background knowledge as context for new learning. 1.1.9 Collaborate with others to broaden and deepen understanding. 1.3.4 Contribute to the exchange of ideas within the learning community. 1.3.5 Use information technology responsibly 2.1.5 Collaborate with others to exchange ideas, develop new understandings, make decisions, and solve problems. 3.1.2 Participate and collaborate as members of a social and intellectual network of learners. 3.1.3 Use writing and speaking skills to communicate new understandings effectively. 3.1.4 Use technology and other information tools to organize and display knowledge and understanding in ways that others can view, use, and assess. 3.2.1 Demonstrate leadership and confidence by presenting ideas to others in both formal and informal situations. 3.2.2 Show social responsibility by participating actively with others in learning situations and by contributing questions and ideas during group discussions. 3.2.3 Demonstrate teamwork by working productively with others. 3.3.5 Contribute to the exchange of ideas within and beyond the learning community. 3.4.1 Assess the processes by which learning was achieved in order to revise strategies and learn more effectively in the future. 3.4.3 Assess own ability to work with others in a group setting by evaluating varied roles, leadership, and demonstrations of respect for other viewpoints. 4.3.1 Participate in the social exchange of ideas, both electronically and in person. 4.3.4 Practice safe and ethical behaviors in personal electronic communication and interaction. 4.4.2 Recognize the limits of own personal knowledge.

Lesson Title: Commenting on a blog Date: Nov. 2008

Level of instruction: 5th grade
Time: 60 min. in the computer lab

Organization of instruction:
Introduction: This class will provide a model for posting comments on our Rooster Games Blog. Together the classroom teacher and I will go over the expectations, show a model comment and then the children will try it out. For this class I will try and carve out 1 hour so that we can go over the expectations and the students can have plenty of time to comment. For the most part I will enact the security feature of the blog that requires me to review comments before they go live. In this case, I will remove that feature so that students can view their posts immediately
******************************************************************************
What did we talk about the last time you were here?
Project Rules and review.
Now that we have created the rules for blogging, we will focus on the content of your posts.

After we go over what you need to include in your comments you will try it out yourselves. This will be similar to the publishing parties we did in the library last year where you displayed your writing on the tables and we all walked around quietly and commented on each others’ writing. The comments will follow a similar format. What did we include in our comments last year?
Write ideas on white board.

Project, pass out and go over checklist:
Introductory sentence.
Write at least 2 sentences which describe something you liked about their essay.
Concluding sentence.
Are all of your statements positive?

Ensure that students understand the requirements by allowing time for questions.

Project Model and post checklist next to it. Have class read model out-loud.

Go back and decide sentence by sentence to determine if all the elements are included in the post.

Give me a thumbs up if you understand what you need to include in your comment, thumb to the side if you aren’t entirely sure but you know where to begin, thumbs down if you have no idea what to do.

Next show students the steps they need to go through on the blog to post the comment. Check that they understand. Include steps at the bottom of their checklist that the can refer to if they get stuck.

As I call your name, I’d like you to go to each bucket and choose one number from each. If you get a number you have already drawn, put it back and draw another. These will be the students whose writing you will comment on (each student in our classes has a student number for the year). Next, head to your computer and get started. Use your checklist and mark off each item as you include it in your first post. Please have a teacher check this first post before you upload it. The next 2 posts you can do on your own. If you get stuck look at the model post to give you ideas and then ask a teacher if you still have questions.

Students begin posting.
At the end of class have students share any insights or tips they have for their classmates.
Inform them that if they would like to post comments on other parts of the blog, they may do so with permission from their parents, but that they must still follow the community established rules.

Specific Learner Objectives:
Understand expectation for posts.
Create three posts successfully.
Extension and Adaptation

• If students at a loss for what to write and seem unable to extrapolate from the model, hand them a fill in the blank sheet to get them started:

L.S (Lovely Student),
Your essay on the book___________________________ was ___________________________________________________. In particular, I enjoyed the way you___________________________
______________________________________________________. I also liked how you______________________________________. Reading your essay made me______________________________. Good luck with the vote.

Sincerely,
ALS (another Lovely Student)

• Additional checklists on hand if students need the visual.
• Steps listed on the bottom of the checklist that detail how to post a comment on Edublogs.


Materials:

LCD projector/computer to show blog, rules, and checklist.
Pencils and paper for students who need to write their ideas first.
Checklists to hand out.
Evaluation / Assessment:

Students successfully follow checklist.
Students write and post 3 meaningful comments.
Students having fun posting comments.

Notes on Lesson:



Follow-up Assignment:

• Students will complete book reviews.
• I will assist teachers in posting finished reviews to the blog.
• Next class we will model how to post a comment to the blog.
AASL Standards Met 1.3.5 Use information technology responsibly 3.1.3 Use writing and speaking skills to communicate new understandings effectively 3.2.1 Demonstrate leadership and confidence by presenting ideas to others in both formal and informal situations. 3.2.2 Show social responsibility by participating actively with others in learning situations and by contributing questions and ideas during group discussions. 3.3.5 Contribute to the exchange of ideas within and beyond the learning community. 3.4.1 Assess the processes by which learning was achieved in order to revise strategies and learn more effectively in the future. 3.4.2 Assess the quality and effectiveness of the learning product. 4.3.1 Participate in the social exchange of ideas, both electronically and in person. 4.3.4 Practice safe and ethical behaviors in personal electronic communication and interaction. 4.4.5 Develop personal criteria for gauging how effectively own ideas are expressed.


Lesson Title: Introduction to Wiki Date: Dec. 2008

Level of instruction: 5th grade
Time: 60 min. in the computer lab

Organization of instruction:
Introduction: This class will provide a model for posting comments on our Rooster Games Wiki. For this lesson the children will write a paragraph about themselves as a way to introduce themselves to their team members. I will create a wiki that is completely private so the students at Lincoln and Wheeler can safely give out personal information about themselves. Together the classroom teacher and I will go over the expectations, show a model introduction and then the children will try it out. For this class I will try and carve out 1 hour so that we can go over the expectations and the students can have plenty of time to comment.
******************************************************************************
What did we talk about the last time you were here?
Posting comments on the blog.
Now that we are familiar with posting comments on the blog we will talk about posting them on a wiki. After we go over what you need to include in your first post you will try it out yourselves.
Explain briefly what a wiki is and how it works.
Project the wiki and show them its various features.
Explain who will have access to this wiki and what kinds of information it will contain.

What do you think the rules will be for posting a comment on this wiki? Will we use the same or different rules for the wiki as we did for the blog? Same. Unless they have new rules to add to contract.

Project rules and review.
For this assignment you will introduce yourself to your teammates. What things should we include in our intros?
Write ideas on white board.

Project, pass out and go over checklist:
Introductory sentence where you state your first name.
Include which school you attend.
Include a sentence describing your favorite book on the list
Mention what activity you are most looking forward to.
Include at least one other details about yourself that you would like your teammates to know about you.
Concluding sentence.

Ensure that students understand the requirements by allowing time for questions.

Project Model and post checklist next to it. Have class read model out-loud.

Go back and decide sentence by sentence to determine if all the elements are included in the post.

Give me a thumbs up if you understand what you need to include in your comment, thumb to the side if you aren’t entirely sure but you know where to begin, thumbs down if you have no idea what to do.

Next show students the steps they need to go through on the wiki to post the comment. Check that they understand. Include steps at the bottom of their checklist that the can refer to if they get stuck.

As I call your name head to your computer and get started. Use your checklist and mark off each item as you include it in your first post. Please have a teacher check your work before you upload it. If you get stuck look at the model post to give you ideas and then ask a teacher if you still have questions.

Students begin posting.
If students do not finish in the allotted time have them post what they have so far.
At the end of class have students share any insights or tips they have for their classmates.
Show them how to go back and edit their posts.
Inform them that if they would like to post comments on other parts of the wiki, they may do so with permission from their parents, but that they must still follow the community established rules.

Specific Learner Objectives:
Understand expectation for posts.
Able to Create introduction which includes all of the elements listed on the checklist.
Able to successfully post to the wiki.
Extension and Adaptation

• If students at a loss for what to write and seem unable to extrapolate from the model, hand them a fill in the blank sheet to get them started:

Hello my name is___________________________ and I go to ___________school. I am 10 years old and my favorite thing to do on the weekend is__________________________. I liked reading the RICBA books. My favorite one was__________________________.
I am most looking forward to _______________________________. See you on Feb. 21st.

Sincerely,
Lovely Student.
• Additional checklists on hand if students need the visual.
• Steps listed on the bottom of the checklist that detail how to post a comment on wikispaces.
Materials:

LCD projector/computer to show wiki, rules, and checklist.
Pencils and paper for students who need to write their ideas first.
Checklists to hand out.
Evaluation / Assessment:

Successfully following checklist.
Write a solid, interesting introduction of themselves.
Have fun posting comments.
Contributing to the group discussions.

Notes on Lesson:

As with the blog, the classroom teacher and I will create a letter to the parents explaining the purpose of a wiki and how we plan to use it in class. Again we will provide parents options if they choose to have their child not participate. In this case, I would send the Lincoln Librarian an introduction of the student to read out loud instead of posting it to the wiki.

Follow-up Assignment:

• During the next class have students brainstorm different topics to discuss on the wiki with their teammates.
• Talk with the students about the etiquette of editing other people’s posts.
• After the Rooster Games are over have the children fill out an evaluation to determine the effectiveness of the new technologies. Ask them to offer any suggestions they have to making it

AASL Standards Met 1.3.5 Use information technology responsibly 3.1.3 Use writing and speaking skills to communicate new understandings effectively 3.2.1 Demonstrate leadership and confidence by presenting ideas to others in both formal and informal situations. 3.2.2 Show social responsibility by participating actively with others in learning situations and by contributing questions and ideas during group discussions. 3.3.5 Contribute to the exchange of ideas within and beyond the learning community. 3.4.1 Assess the processes by which learning was achieved in order to revise strategies and learn more effectively in the future. 3.4.2 Assess the quality and effectiveness of the learning product. 4.1.7 Use social networks and information tools to gather and share information. 4.3.1 Participate in the social exchange of ideas, both electronically and in person. 4.3.4 Practice safe and ethical behaviors in personal electronic communication and interaction. 4.4.5 Develop personal criteria for gauging how effectively own ideas are expressed.

Jeannine said...

EDC921 Final
A School blog
cranstoncalvertschool.blogspot.com
Jeannine Walsh

Introduction
My main goal for creating the school based blog is to introduce the faculty to the read/write web, specifically blogs and in turn have them create a collaborative school blog for students, parents and administrators. Unfortunately the only teacher at Cranston Calvert School that was familiar with web 2.0 was the library media specialist. Once school begins, she is willing to assist me in training and working with our peers to further develop this site. The final project was one that I felt would be the most beneficial to me and the staff. With a new reading program and new phonics program in place this year I did not want to overwhelm the teachers and risk losing them entirely by throwing a lot of new terms and technologies at them. With this in mind I wanted to give the staff a small taste of the resources covered in this class.


Goals for the Cranston Calvert Blog

Teachers will
• Learn what a blog is and share benefits of its use in education
• Create their own blog which will be added to the school blog
• Use pictures, video, and podcasts to enhance their individual blogs
• Post comments to peers blogs
• Post ideas and lesson plans to share on either blog
• Use the school blog as a reference, now and in the future
• Reflect on how this tool can be used with students in their own classroom
• Learn about podcasts and their value in education
• Use the school wiki at cranstoncalvertschool.pbwiki.com to share lessons/ideas
• Learn what social bookmarking entails
• Understand the benefits of using the read/write web in the classroom




Activities
Teachers will get an overview of the read/write web, blogs, podcasts wikis and social bookmarking. They will then search links, create their own blog, edit the school wiki and reflect on their practice in regards to this new technology. These activities aim to provide a foundation for understanding web 2.0 tools.

Writing Assignments
After each activity teachers will be asked to post a quick write about that topic and to reflect on how each tool can assist them in their own classroom.
Activity #1 - Please click on the comment button under the video, Did you Know, and post one quick thought you had while watching this video.
Activity #2 - Please take a few minutes to look at some of the blogs linked in the left hand column under Our Blog List. After searching through a couple of these sites, add a comment or two about your thoughts or add a link to a new site that you may have found. We'll add it to our list.
Activity #3 - Today you are each going to create your own blog. Once your peers have created their blogs please take the time to check them out and post a comment.
Activity #4 - Think about how you could use podcasting with your students. Please share some of your thoughts and ideas under the comments section.
Activity #5 - Click on the link and look for the edit button to try out our new wiki at cranstoncalvertschool.pbwiki.com
Activity #6 - When you have a few minutes take the time to browse one of these sites, and if you're feeling adventurous sign up for your own account.

Implementation of project
We begin each year with a professional development retreat at Alton Jones, I will present my final project (the school blog which can be found at cranstoncalvertschool.blogspot.com ). The presentation will consist of dissecting the blog and then working on six activities which will give them an introduction to some of the Web 2.0 tools such as blogs, podcasts, wikis, and social bookmarks.
My hope is that this blog will turn into a useful resource for teachers everywhere and also be a model for other schools in our district.

Dave, thanks for all the support and wonderful resources. I'm sure I'll be visiting this site many times in the near future.

jack'sblog said...

Hey, Brooke:
It's interesting to see that you and I are employing the blogs in much the same manner -- helping children gain an appreciation for literature and make connections to their lives, other books, and the world they live in. I also like the association of the object with the book for a lesson on symbolism. It's been a pleasure.
Jeannine, I like your idea of getting the faculty educated and on board, but good luck with the recalcitrants like yours truly. I hear there's at least one in every crowd.
To all of EDC 921 classmates -- Have a rewarding and successful school year, but don't forget to paint a few towns red before the summer ends.

Cheryl Simmons said...

Final Project:
Dear EDC 921:
For my final project, I created a professional development plan for a therapy department. The ultimate goal was to improve the exposure, understanding and use of Web 2.0 tools into our daily practice. Since as a department, we are located in a variety of districts, schools and teams I know that it would be easier to communicate using some of the Web 2.0 tools. I hope that be incorporating it into our professional lives, we as therapists will then be able to teach and think of creative ways to integrate these technologies with our students and classrooms.
Ultimately, creating a Therapy Office Online was the first goal- to allow staff access to documents, schedules calendars and the ability to communicate collaboratively. Right now, we do it all by email and one yahoo calendar. Someone recommended airset.com to me as an online organizational system and it seemed to be an ideal online tool for a traveling clinician. I'm not sure if it is a good choice, but we are going to try it. I then hoped staff would utilize a wiki for a specific referral process for students on service who need an assistive technology evaluation. These evaluations are new to our region but we are developing a new team this year and what better way to collaborate than through a Wiki. Our plan is to use a closed wiki for this collaborative assessment process. We also created a first wiki for everyone to access. Also included in the professional development plan is some foundation skill development for therapist to consider when looking at having students access technology including free tools that are available online or in the operating systemcess to online tools accessible for all students.
The entire final project is lengthy so I posted it to the Wiki.

It has been a pleasure learning and reading all of your posts.
Dave, thank you for opening the doors of this class to different disciplines in education. I'm sure that I will be back many times to this site.
Take care everyone,
Cheryl

Lynne Deakers said...

I have selected two different grade level projects and created lessons and a wiki for each since this is how it works for me as the librarian. I do a lot of collaboration with teachers on projects like these. I have chosen to use AASL standards for 21st century learners. The teacher will incorporate curricular standards in her part of the project.I have also upload to wiki where the formatting is much better. Please read there. Thanks for
everyone's comments and help. Great class!!
Teaching Unit: Early California History
Grade Level: 4th
Setting Library/Computer lab/Classroom
Classroom teacher and librarian will collaborate on this project. They will be administrators of the class wiki; students will all be contributing members.
Pre-requisites:
• Parent/child IUP form signed and on file; includes parent permission for student to have an e-mail account
• If student does not have an e-mail account one will be set one up for them with g-mail by the teacher
• All members of the class will have joined the class wiki
Time needed: Two 45 minute library sessions and two 45 minute computer lab sessions. The written assignment will be done during second computer lab time with follow up and finishing in the classroom and at home.
.
Introduction: This lesson will familiarize students with building a class wiki at http://ssjgrade4.wikispaces.com. It will give them an opportunity to do some research using primary and secondary sources. They will also have an opportunity to contribute to their very own class wiki http://ssjgrade4.wikispaces.com.

Goals
• Students will work in the library doing individual research on their chosen topic, filling in the “A research guide” worksheet found on the wiki to answer questions about the subject they are researching
• Student will be able to access the class wiki, use the active web links and add appropriate web links they discovered for others to use.
• Students will use a printed work sheet created in Google docs to guide them in their library research. This document template will be shared through Google Docs.
• Students will use their Google docs account to open the file and fill in the worksheet using complete sentences. and then present their findings to their small group for discussion.
• Each student will write a descriptive essay about their assigned topic for the wiki.
• Students will create their topic page on the class wiki and upload their information
• Students will upload images, audio, and video they have prepared in class to their wiki page after discussing it with the teacher
• Students will cite resources on their page
• Student groups will add their mission or native tribe to the California map on the class wiki and timeline
• Students will contribute information to the field trip page including audio and video transcript of their field trip.

Standards for 21st Century Learner (AASL, 20007)
1.1.3 Develop and refine a range of questions to frame the search for new understanding.
1.1.4 Find, evaluate and select appropriate sources to answer questions.
1.1.5 Evaluate information found in selected sources on the basis of accuracy, validity, and appropriateness for needs, importance, and social and cultural context.
1.1.7 Make sense of information gathered from diverse sources by identifying misconceptions, main and supporting ideas, conflicting information and point of view or bias.
1.1.8 Demonstrate mastery of technology tools for accessing information and pursuing inquiry
1.2.1 Display initiative and engagement by posing questions and investigating the answers beyond the collection of superficial facts.
1.3.2 Seek divergent perspectives during information gathering and assessment.
2.1.1 Apply critical-thinking skills(analysis, synthesis, evaluation, organization) to information and knowledge
2.1.2 Organize knowledge so that it is useful
2.1.4 Use technology and other information tools to analyze and organize information
2.1.6 Use the writing process, media and visual literacy, and technology skills to create products that express new understandings.

3.1.4 Use technology and other information tools to organize and display knowledge and understanding in ways that others can view, use, and assess.
3.1.6 Use information and technology ethically and responsibly.
3.4.1 Assess the processes by which learning was achieved in order to revise strategies and learn more effectively in the future.
3.4.2 Assess the quality and effectiveness of the learning product.
Materials needed:
• LCD projector/computer with internet connection
• Student access to computers
• Students come prepared with user name; password and e-mail address
• Worksheet and graphic organizer
• print materials on Early California history
Pre-Activities
Students will have had a review lesson on computer netiquette and responsible use of the computer including proper procedures and rules for accessing e-mail and internet.
Two class session in the library:
• Librarian will give project overview showing students the shell of the wiki that will be their working document for this social studies unit on Early California History.
• Students will begin their research using texts provided in the library and internet sites provided on a page on the class wiki at http://ssjgrade4.wikispaces.com. They will take notes on their graphic organizer and use the works cited work sheet to document resources. They will also be studying this time period in their social studies curriculum
• Groups will get together during a class period to discuss their findings

Writing Assignments
• Two sessions in the computer lab will be set aside for student writing
• Students will submit their rough draft via e-mail to the teacher for comment before uploading it to the class wiki.
• Librarian will demonstrate how to access the wiki, upload information, edit information, and discuss information.
• Demonstrations of uploading audio and video as well as internet links will also be practiced under the guidance of the librarian teaching this class.
• The following week in the library the students who have not already done so will go to the class wiki and complete their written assignment below.

Students are encouraged to read and comment on other student wiki pages. A classroom display of artifacts reflecting student research will be provided as an extension of their work on this project.


Extension and Adaptation
Librarian and two parent volunteers will be moving through the groups and helping individuals with their research as needed during all class sessions. Extra help will also be available during recess, lunch and after school in the library and classroom teacher will be available during certain class periods to assist those who need extra help



Teaching Unit Assessment Rubric
4 points 3 points 2 points 1 point
Graphic Organizer
Graphic organizer has been completed and shows clear, logical relationships between all topics and subtopics Graphic organizer has been completed and shows clear, logical relationships between most topics Graphic organizer started and includes some topics and subtopics Graphic organizer started but incomplete
Group work

Took initiative in the group and completed all assignments Took initiative in the group and completed part of the assignment Showed some interest in group work and completed some of the assignment Showed little effort to be part of the team
Writing assignment

All topics are addresses and all questions answered with at least 2 sentences about each using correct grammar, spelling and complete sentences All topics are addresses and all questions answered with at least 2 sentences about each with almost no grammatical or spelling errors. Most sentences complete All topics are addresses and most questions answered with at least 1 sentence about each. A few grammatical or spelling errors. Showed minimal effort in answering questions. Grammar and spelling errors and incomplete sentences throughout.
Sources All sources (information and graphics) are accurately documented in the desired format. All sources (information and graphics) are accurately documented but a few are not in the desired format. All sources (information and graphics) are accurately documented but many are not in desired format. Some sources are not accurately documented.
Class wiki content and participation

Added appropriate content and participated in discussion on the wiki more than once Added appropriate content and participated in discussion on the wiki once Added appropriate content but did not participate in discussion on the wiki Add minimal amount of unique content OR Did not participate in the discussion
Point system: 20…A, 18…A-,17…B+, 16…B, 14…B-, 13…C+,
11….C. 10…C-, 8…incomplete

Lesson Plan: Wikipedia
Grade Level: 5th
Setting Library/Computer lab/Classroom
Classroom teacher and librarian will collaborate on this project. They will be administrators of the class wiki; students will all be contributing members.
Pre-requisites:
• Parent/child IUP form signed and on file; includes parent permisson for student to have an e-mail account
• If student does not have an e-mail account one will be set one up for them with gmail by the teacher
• All members of the class will have joined the class wiki
Time needed: Two 45 minute computer lab session and two 45 minute library sessions. The written assignment will be done during second computer lab time with follow up and finishing in the classroom and at home.
Introduction: This lesson will familiarize students with Wikipedia http://wikipedia.org and how to evaluate its use as a resource. It will also give them an opportunity to contribute to their very own class wiki http://ssjgrade5.wikispaces.com/
Goals
• Students will work in groups of four to find information on a selected topic in Wikipedia and compare and contrast the article with the same topic article in the world book hard copy for accuracy and completeness.
• Students in the group will divide the information into four sections (one for each student to work on for compare and contrast information checking in World Book vs. Wikipedia
• Students will fill out a graphic organizer work sheet and then present their findings to their small group for discussion.
• Students will use the class wiki to comment on their findings and discuss the use of Wikipedia as a valid resource
Standards for 21st Century Learner (AASL, 20007)
1.1.3 Develop and refine a range of questions to frame the search for new understanding.
1.1.5 Evaluate information found in selected sources on the basis of accuracy, validity, appropriateness for needs, importance, and social and cultural context.
1.1.7 Make sense of information gathered from diverse sources by identifying misconceptions, main and supporting ideas, conflicting information and point of view or bias.
1.1.8 Demonstrate mastery of technology tools for accessing information and pursuing inquiry
2.1.1 Apply critical-thinking skills(analysis, synthesis, evaluation, organization) to information and knowledge
2.1.2 Organize knowledge so that it is useful
2.1.4 Use technology and other information tools to analyze and organize information
2.1.6 Use the writing process, media and visual literacy, and technology skills to create products that express new understandings.
3.1.4 Use technology and other information tools to organize and display knowledge and understanding in ways that others can view, use, and assess.
3.1.6 Use information and technology ethically and responsibly.
3.4.1 Assess the processes by which learning was achieved in order to revise strategies and learn more effectively in the future.
3.4.2 Assess the quality and effectiveness of the learning product.
Materials needed:
• LCD projector/computer with internet connection
• Student access to computers
• Students come prepared with user name; password and e-mail address
• Graphic organizer: Venn Diagram handout: two concentric circles, similar in center, different on either side
• Writing assignment questions handout
• Lesson Plan Assessment Rubric* to share with class
Pre-Activities
Students will have had a review lesson on computer netiquette and responsible use of the computer including proper procedures and rules for accessing e-mail and internet
Class session one in computer lab:
• Librarian will have students log into their own computer and go through the various tabs on a Wikipedia page to learn about how it is set up and who edits and where the edits are; where the credentials are, etc. How the links work and just a basic orientation hands on to this resource. They will have some time to look around.
• Librarian will also discus netiquette and wiki editing and online citizenship amd responsibilities
• Librarian to introduce grade 5 wiki and demonstrate how to add and label a new page; discuss other tabs and project expectations
Class session two and three in the library:
• Students will be divided into groups of four. They will choose an invention from the wiki list to look up in two sources: Wikipedia and World Book
• Student will look up the topic and print the article four times and decide how to divide up the content into four segments for fact checking.
• Each student will complete the Venn diagram worksheet to compare and contrast the facts listed in their segment.
• Groups will get together to discuss their findings using the set of questions listed under writing assignment below.
Writing Assignments
• The following week in the computer lab the students will go to the class wiki and complete their written assignment below.
• Each student will go to the class wiki to the topic page they are working on and follow the instructions. (If more than on student needs to work on the same page one will work on the page and the others will copy and paste the page into a word document and work on the document in word. They will coordinate uploading these to the wiki with the teacher and the librarian’s assistance.) They will type in their response to questions on that page of the class wiki. These are the questions. Each student will respond to the first question. Then they each select at least two more to respond to.
o Did the facts check out from Wikipedia to word book or was there a discrepancy? Please note it here.
o What was different about the information in Wikipedia than in World Book?
o What did you like best about wikipedia?
o What did you like least?
o What did you like best about world book?
o What did you like least?
o How many references were there? What does this mean?
o How many links? What does this mean?
o How many see also’s? What does this mean?

• There will then be a collaborative answer on the home page to these questions:
o Is Wikipedia a valid source of information for students doing research? Please qualify your answer.
o Please use discussion tab to dialog with other students and/or explain your edits to the final group answer.

As a bonus assignment, a class member or group can decide if their discoveries warrant actually modifying the Wikipedia page. They must submitted their proposal to edit a Wikipedia page to her in a word document for review. If the teacher decides they have a valid edit, she will sign in and allow the students to make the corrections

Extension and Adaptation
Librarian and two parent volunteers will be moving through the groups and helping individuals with their research as needed during all class sessions. Extra help will also be available during recess, lunch and after school in the library and classroom teacher will be available during certain class periods to assist those who need extra help


*Lesson Plan Assessment Rubric
4 points 3 points 2 points 1 point
Graphic Organizer
Graphic organizer has been completed and shows clear, logical comparisons of at least 6 facts Graphic organizer has been completed and shows clear, logical comparisons of 4 of the facts Graphic organizer started and includes at least 2 fact but compare/contrast not clear Graphic organizer started and includes 1 fact
Group work

Took initiative in the group and completed all assignments Took initiative in the group and completed part of the assignment Showed some interest in group work and completed some of the asssignment Showed little effort to be part of the team
Writing assignment

Answered a minimum of three questions using correct grammar, spelling and complete sentences Answered two of the three questions with almost no grammatical or spelling errors. Most sentences complete Answered two of the three questions but had numerous grammatical or spelling errors and sentences incomplete Showed minimal effort in answering questions. Grammar and spelling errors and incomplete sentences
Class wiki content and participation

Added appropriate content and participated in discussion on the wiki more than once Added appropriate content and participated in discussion on the wiki once Added appropriate content but did not participate in discussion on the wiki Add minimal amount of unique content. Did not participate in the discussion
Point system: 16…A, 15…A-,14…B+, 13…B, 12…B-, 11…C+,
10….C. 9…C-, 8…incomplete

Ms. DiTusa said...

Final project EDC 921

Lynn DiTusa
Grades 7 and 8 Language Arts teacher
Narragansett Pier School
Narragansett, Rhode Island

GLEs ADDRESSED IN THE UNIT:

READING
R-7-16 Generates a personal response to what is read through a variety of means…
R-7-16.1 Comparing stories or other texts to related personal experience, prior knowledge, or to other books

R-7-14 Demonstrates the habit of reading widely and extensively by
R-7-14.1 Reading with frequency, including in-school, out-of-school, and summer reading
R-7-14.2 Reading from a wide range of genres/kinds of text, including primary and secondary sources, and a variety of authors (e.g. literary, informational, and practical/functional texts)
R-7-14.3 Reading multiple texts for depth of understanding an author, subject, theme, or genre

R-7-17 Demonstrates participation in a literate community by
R-7-17.1 Self-selecting reading materials in line with reading ability and personal interests
R-7-17.2 Participating in in-depth discussions about text, ideas, and student writing by offering comments and supporting evidence, recommending books and other materials, and responding to comments and recommendations of peers, librarians, teachers, and others

WRITING
W-7-11 Demonstrates the habit of writing extensively by
W-7-11.1 Writing with frequency, including in-school, out-of-school, and during the summer
W-7-11.2 Sharing thoughts, observations, or impressions
W-7-11.3 Generating topics for writing EXAMPLES: [selected] journal writing, free writes, quick writes, writers’ notebook, reading response journals

W-7-9 In independent writing, students demonstrate command of appropriate English conventions by
W-7-9.1 Applying rules of standard English usage to correct grammatical errors
W-7-9.2 Applying capitalization rules
W-7-9.4 Applying appropriate punctuation to various sentence patterns to enhance meaning
W-7-9.5 Correctly spelling grade-appropriate, high-frequency works and applying conventional spelling patterns/rules

OC-7-1 In oral communication, students demonstrate interactive listening by
OC-7-1.4 Participating in large and small group discussions showing respect for a range of individual ideas

OC-7-2 In oral communication, students make oral presentations by
OC-7-2.1 Exhibiting logical organization and language use, appropriate to audience, context, and purpose
OC-7-2.2 Maintaining a consistent focus
OC-7-2.3 Including smooth transitions, supporting thesis with well-chosen details, and providing a coherent conclusion
OC-7-2.4 Effectively responding to audience questions and feedback
OC-7-2.5 Using a variety of strategies of address (e.g. eye contact, speaking rate, volume, articulation, inflection, intonation, rhythm, and gesture) to communicate ideas effectively



RATIONALE:
Students are expected to read 15 novels in the course of the school year. Although the teacher sometimes assigns a specific novel or a novel within a particular genre, the students do have the opportunity to self-select their reading material, provided that it is appropriate for their reading level. Students often share their opinions of what they have read, conduct book talks, deliver presentations, make recommendations, create visual representations of the novel, and role play. These activities are significant, for they show the students’ knowledge of what they have read, yet they are even more powerful when their peers are motivated to read specific novels or investigate authors with whom they are unfamiliar. One goal for this unit is to create an on-going platform for students to communicate with their peers about what they are reading.

The students are required to do a great deal of writing. They write lab reports, research papers, essays, articles, poems, want ads, reader-response journal entries, short stories, scripts, etc. However, they do not often have the opportunity to free-write and share their work; for those reasons, another goal for this unit is to use the blog as Writers’ Notebooks. I have incorporated Writers’ Notebooks in my class to an extent over the last few years, and I have been pleased with the results. Although I do provide certain guidelines for their entries, the students have considerable freedom with topic selection. When they are given a prompt, they respond immediately and are motivated, enthusiastic, and productive. Perhaps the best part of using Writers’ Notebooks is the sharing of their work. Some students are willing to read their work aloud, and even more are willing to listen. I enjoy listening as well, particularly because I learn so much about the students’ personalities in the process. By using the blog as a component of the Writers’ Notebooks, students will be able to read what all of their classmates have written and respond to those entries. While the first goal of using blogs in my class this year is to increase discussion of what they are reading, my second is to foster their interest in writing.



LESSON #1:
INTRODUCTION Since the students will be involved in discussions and presentations throughout the two years in my class, they need to learn basic public speaking skills.
GOALS • Students will construct a brief personal experience speech.
• Students will demonstrate positive speaking skills, such as pacing, inflection, volume, stance, and eye contact, while delivering the speech.
PRE-ACTIVITIES
• I will begin by demonstrating a what-not-to-do speech. I will instruct the students to jot down their comments about why my presentation was unsuccessful, which will be used for discussion after I conclude.
• When I finish, we will discuss what the problems were in my presentation and write the feedback on the board. Problems with my presentation include my looking at the ceiling, looking at the floor, rocking back and forth and side to side, speaking too quickly, speaking too slowly, using a monotone, trailing off at the end of a sentence, talking with my hands, leaning against the board, etc.
• I will then instruct about speaking skills with the use of a PowerPoint that I created. It acknowledges speaker apprehensions, has lots of fun sound effects and graphics to ease the tension (since some students panic at the thought of speaking in front of a group), includes relaxation tricks, includes public speaking do’s and don’ts, and previews the speaking tasks that they will perform.
• Next, I will restate and explain in further detail how students need to effective use pacing, inflection, projection, stance, and eye contact.
• Students will then do additional critical viewing by watching clips of significant orators and discussing their observations within small groups
YouTube videos: Focus on Martin Luther King, Jr., John F. Kennedy, Jr., and Franklin Roosevelt
http://www.socyberty.com/History/The-10-Most-Memorable-Speeches-of-the-Twentieth-Century.166993
The following site has a much broader range of material:
http://www.americanrhetoric.com/top100speechesall.html
There are also extensive lesson plans on the following site:
http://www.teach-nology.com/teachers/lesson_plans/language_arts/speaking/
• To practice their own speaking skills, students will select an anecdote from Reader’s Digest from one of the following sections: Life in These United States, Humor in Uniform, Campus Comedy, All in a Day’s Work, or Laughter is the Best Medicine. They are to read the passage aloud several times for fluency. Then, they need to work with a partner so that the partner can offer feedback. Students must stand as they rehearse, hold the magazine at the appropriate height, and keep in mind the techniques mentioned above.
• As students present, their classmates must record their observations on the chart that I will supply. Later, I will provide feedback to each student privately.
• After the explanation of the writing assignment below, I will present a speech about my own embarrassing moments, this time demonstrating proper behaviors. Also, on the overhead projector, I will show them how I constructed the speech.
WRITING ASSIGNMENT: Students will write a brief personal experience speech based on one of the following topics:
1. Embarrassing moments
2. Injury stories
3. Vacation/trip highlights
4. Significant episodes/situations in your life
5. Other topic with teacher approval
The speech must include a hook or introduction, build-up to the main points, transition between stories (if more than one), and a closing. The speech should be 2-5 minutes only, so choose your topic wisely. After the speeches are written, students must practice and present.
EXTENSION AND ADAPTATION: • Cue cards can be made for the Reader’s Digest exercise.
• Students can memorize the Reader’s Digest exercise.
• Depending on the comfort level of students, they can follow various directions: Group 1: present Reader’s Digest to each other and begin speech writing; Group 2: present Reader’s Digest to me, get feedback from me, present again in the small group;
Group 3: practice with mirror or on own or with a partner to gain confidence
• Graphic organizers will be provided for speech writing.
• Students can write a second speech, evaluate the two, and present the stronger one.
• Students can create the rubric for the speech and for the presentation.
• Students can include visuals with their presentations, such as outlines or timelines.
• Students can research several speeches by the same individual to find patterns or mannerisms.
• Students can practice reading aloud famous speeches using the techniques discussed.
ASSESSMENT: • Information from peer feedback chart
• Rubric for speech – writing
• Rubric for speech – speaking






LESSON #2:
INTRODUCTION Once students have practiced speaking in front of a group, they will conduct a book talk based on one of their summer reading selections.
GOALS • Students will write one-two paragraphs about a summer reading book that they enjoyed.
• Students will give a book talk in order to pique the interest of their peers.
PRE-ACTIVITIES • I will discuss with students the purpose of book talks and how to construct them using the following site:
http://olc.spsd.sk.ca/DE/PD/instr/strats/booktalks/index.html
Here, Nancy Keane explains what a book talk is, includes book talk rubrics, and provides an incredible list of book talk samples. I will give students time to browse some of the samples so that they have a sense of how to write their own. I must, of course, point out a few of my favorites, such as Watership Down, And Then There Were None, and The Outsiders. (Another good teacher resource is
http://www.det.wa.edu.au/education/cip/learntech/eng/pr/#4)
• Nancy Keane provides a link to Scholastic, which has book talks in written form and on video. I will definitely show some of the videos to the kids because they serve as wonderful examples:
http://www.scholastic.com/librarians/ab/booktalks.htm
• I will have students view book talk videos by students as shown on TeacherTube. They can browse the five pages of book talks. The videos are not as polished as those on the Scholastic site, however.
http://www.teachertube.com/search_result.php?search_id=BOOK+TALK&x=19&y=7
• After they read and view book talks, they will meet in groups and discuss what makes for a compelling book talk. They will also mention the examples they liked the best and explain why.
• I will invite our media specialist to give some book talks about recent additions to the library. She conducted several book talks last year, and the students did seek them out. Our literacy coordinator has also given book talks about an entire collection of survival novels, which then enables students to select books for literature circles.
• Finally, I will do a book talk about one of the book that we will be reading as a class, Freak the Mighty.
WRITING ASSIGNMENT Students will write a one-two paragraph book talk about one of the novels they read for summer reading. They should follow these guidelines:
• Include the title and author of the book.
• Provide some information about the main character(s).
• Introduce the main conflict in the novel.
• Build the suspense by mentioning an exciting or tense situation, but do not reveal the ending.
• Conclude with a statement or question that leaves them thinking.
• Throughout the paragraph(s), use compelling and gripping word choice.
EXTENSION AND ADAPTATION • Students will present their book talks to the class incorporating the public speaking techniques discussed earlier.
• Students can write book talks for all of their summer reading books.
• Students can locate other sites with lists of book talks.
• Students can use the list of authors from the summer reading list, compile book talks about their works, and create a class wiki. They can also add to this wiki as they read books for which they could not find book talks.
• Students can create a bulletin board display for the book talk write-ups.
ASSESSMENT • Rubric for book talk – speaking
• Rubric for book talk – writing


AUTHORS FOR SUMMER READING: STUDENTS ENTERING GRADE 7

Almond, David
Atwater-Rhodes, Amelia
Avi
Bloor, Edward
Brooks, Bruce
Bunting, Eve
Clements, Andrew
Cooney, Caroline
Creech, Sharon
Crutcher, Chris
Duncan, Lois
Dygard, Thomas
Farmer, Nancy
Flake, Sharon
Fox, Paula
Funke, Cornelia
Gantos, Jack Gliori, Debi
Gutman, Dan
Haddix, Margaret Peterson
Hamilton, Virginia
Hesse, Karen
Hobbs, Will
Kerr, M.E.
Konigsburg, E.L.
LeGuin, Ursula
Lowry, Lois
MacHale, D.J.
Mazur, Harry
Mazer, Norma Fox
McDaniel, Lurlene
Myers, Walter Dean
Napoli, Donna Jo
Naylor, Phyllis
Nixon, Joan Lowry
O’Dell, Scott
Paolini, Christopher
Paterson, Katherine
Paulsen, Gary
Pullman, Philip
Rees, Celia
Rinaldi, Ann
Shusterman, Neal
Sleator, William
Spinelli, Jerry
Voight, Cynthia
Wolff, Virginia E.
Yolen, Jane
Zindel, Paul



LESSON #3:
INTRODUCTION Within the next few lessons, the students will incorporate what they have learned in lessons 1 and 2 into a classroom blog. However, before that can happen, the students need to be introduced to blogging.
GOALS • Students will be able to explain what blogging is and how it will be used as a classroom tool.
• Students will develop an argument for or against blog use in and for school.
PRE-ACTIVITIES • Students will take a technology inventory, rating their familiarity with various programs and devices that they will use throughout the two-year span.
• In small groups, students will chart their familiarity with and use of programs. The results will then be posted for comparison.
• The class will then discuss what blogging is and their experience with it.
• Then, in a chalk talk, the students will explore the positive and negative aspects of using a blog in our class. In a chalk talk, a question or controversial statement is written on the board. Then, students approach the board, one or two at a time, and write a response or probing question to the initial prompt or to other students’ responses. They do this in silence, communicating only through their words on the board. They continue until they have no other input. At the conclusion of the chalk talk, the teacher comments and expands on what they have written. (A blog can serve the same purpose as a chalk talk – students have the chance to express their opinions as well as respond to those of others.) Chalk talks can also take place on large posterboards at stations; children can rotate to the stations.
• I will show the video “Why Blog in School” to add to the discussion:
http://www.teachertube.com/view_video.php?viewkey=9742b1a047c8dc6b1e99
• Students will then visit some student blogs to see what type of work is being done with them.
http://itc.blogs.com/babin/
Click on students’ names in the left margin:
http://visitmyclass.com/blogs/burnett/default.aspx
Listen to some of their podcasts in which they recreate fairy tales. Also, click on their Free Writing, Town Stories, and archives for May 2005 in the right margin. There is an excellent variety of writing samples.
http://itc.blogs.com/thewriteweblog/
Explore multiple areas of The Write Weblog:
http://duckdiaries.edublogs.org/
They just have to see Duck Diaries!
• For the writing assignment, students will go through series of steps: discussion and brainstorming, completion of a graphic organizer, a first draft, peer revision and editing, and a final copy.
WRITING ASSIGNMENT Students will write a persuasive paragraph about blogging based only on their opinion. They will argue for or against blogging being used in and for school. They must include a topic sentence, at least three substantial reasons to support their perspective, and a closing sentence. The intended audience is the principal, so they are to write in a formal manner.
EXTENSION AND ADAPTATION • I will set up tutorials for students who have gaps in their knowledge of technology; the tutors will be students who are more advanced in the area of technology. These sessions can be in the form of full-class instruction for fairly new technology or in smaller groups for refresher sessions. This situation will be an excellent way for advanced students to take their ability to another level by teaching their peers.
• Students can challenge themselves by arguing the opposite side as well.
• Students can find articles about blogging that provide arguments for both sides of the issue and incorporate evidence in their paragraphs as support. The use of research and evidence as support usually is not taught so early in the year, yet some students might be ready for that step.
• Students can develop a survey for faculty and staff members about the topic and then compile the results.
ASSESSMENT • Assessment of prior knowledge about technology
• Rubric for persuasive paragraph



LESSON #4:
INTRODUCTION Students will begin the process of using a blog in and for class.
GOALS • Students and teacher will develop a use policy for a class blog.
PRE-ACTIVITIES • In small groups, students will list do’s and don’ts of posting to a blog. Based on the school rules and based on my guidelines for their writing, what should the rules be for a classroom blog?
• As a full class, we will debrief by listing their comments on the board, combining or rephrasing when possible, and prioritizing.
• Then, they will explore what other students and teachers have developed, taking notes about ideas that they think we should include in our policy:
http://yongesonne.edublogs.org/2006/09/18/another-take-on-blogging-rules/
http://pc20s.blogspot.com/2005/09/students-made-this.html
http://mathmusings.blogspot.com/2006/01/safe-blogging.html
http://www.budtheteacher.com/wiki/index.php?title=Student_Created_Blog_Policies
http://hetherington0607.learnerblogs.org/rules-for-blogging/

WRITING ASSIGNMENT Each group will write a classroom blog policy. They will begin with formal stems, such as “Students will/will not…” or “Teacher can…” Each statement should be brief yet specific and should reflect school rules as well as common courtesy and respect. Also, the policy should not contain more than ten statements. The audience is administration.
EXTENSION AND ADAPTATION • Students can develop a letter for parents in which they explain how and why a blog will be use as part of our ELA class.
• Students can write a script, explaining their blog policy. Later, they can post this script as a podcast, which can be included on our blog.
• Students can post to the blogs of students in other schools and ask them about the success they have had with blogging as well as about problems or student misuse.
• Students can use our school’s handbook to see how policy is written. This exercise is also a good way to incorporate public documents.
http://www.narragansett.k12.ri.us/NPS/handbook/Handbook2006-2007.pdf
Behavior policy
http://www.narragansett.k12.ri.us/NPS/athletics/Athlete_Policies.pdf
Athletic policy
ASSESSMENT • Rubric for policy




LESSON #5:
INTRODUCTION In order for students to apply their speaking skills as well as motivate others to read a book that they have enjoyed, they are going to select a passage to read aloud on a podcast and post along with the book talk written piece. This lesson will connect what they have learned thus far: speaking skills, the use of book talks, the concept of blogging, and acceptable posting policy.
GOALS • Students will be able to access the blog and post their book talk written piece.
• Students will select a passage within the text that exemplifies the author’s style.
• Students will use effective speaking practices to do a dramatic reading of the passage in the form of a podcast.
• Students will post the podcast on the class blog.
PRE-ACTIVITIES • Since students have already prepared the written book talk, they will just have to post them. I will show them my blog and explain how to post by posting the sample book talk that I gave based on the book Freak the Mighty. In this process, I will instruct them to save as draft only so that I will be able to screen all material before it gets posted:
http://msditusasblog.blogspot.com/
• Next, I will introduce podcasting to them and explain that they will be reading a passage from the novel about which they did a book talk. Their classmates will be able to listen to the podcasts when they are trying to find something “good” to read.
• I will select a passage from A Separate Peace and demonstrate reading with enthusiasm and inflection.

“We were standing on the limb, I a little farther out than Finny. I turned to say something else, some stalling remark, something to delay even a few seconds more, and then I realized that in turning I had begun to lose my balance. There was a moment of total, impersonal panic, and then Finny’s hand shot out and grabbed my arm, and with my balance restored, the panic immediately disappeared. I turned back toward the river, moved a few more steps along the limb, sprang far out and fell into the deep water. Finny also make a good jump, and the Super Suicide Society of the Summer Session was officially established.

It was only after dinner, when I was on my way alone to the library, that the full danger I had brushed on the limb shook me again. If Finny hadn’t come right up behind me…if he hadn’t been there…I could have fallen on the bank and broken my back! If I had fallen awkwardly enough, I could have been killed. Finny had practically saved my life.” (31-32).
• Then, students will go back to the novel they read in order to find a gripping passage, one that will prompt others to read it. This passage should not give away too much about the novel’s climax or resolution, however.
• Once students locate passages, they will prepare for the podcast by reading aloud to a partner, paying particular attention to punctuation, rhythm, pace, and volume.
• Students will also practice recording themselves on tape recorders since they are readily available. This way, once they hear themselves, make adjustments, and improve their reading, then they will prepare a podcast.
• I will show “Podcasting in Plain English”:
http://podcastingvideos.blogspot.com/
• Since I am not completely confident about this process, I will invite our technology coordinator to assist in the process of podcasting.
• Resources for podcasting:
http://www.yahoo.com/publish
http://learninginhand.com/podcasting/create.html
http://www.shambles.net/pages/learning/ict/podcast/
http://www.learnoutloud.com/toplevel_podcast.php?s=092d9072ec9ec1acb051b8044a62de71and
http://www.shawnwheeler.name/workshops/adventuresnpodcastingpresentation/
http://chatt.hdsb.ca/~magps/boylit/edweek%20article.pdf

WRITING ASSIGNMENT • A writing assignment used for part of this lesson was introduced in lesson #2.
• A second writing assignment is attached to the extension and adaptation section.
EXTENSION AND ADAPTATION • Students will read the article “Why Every School Should Be Podcasting” and highlight the reasons that answer why. They are to then use the evidence in a constructed response.
http://www.guardian.co.uk/education/2007/sep/18/link.link16

ASSESSMENT Rubric for constructed response



LESSON #6:
INTRODUCTION Now that the students have worked with their summer reading, they need to look ahead to what they are going to read next. They will use their classmates’ book talks and podcasts in order to select a book or an author. Even though I prefer that they use the resources that their classmates have provided, I will allow them to choose books by any of the authors on the summer reading list. Once they choose a book to read, they will blog about their reading and provide comments about the classmates’ posts. Through the use of the blog, I can monitor their comprehension and analysis of the novel.
GOALS • Students will use the blog to assist them as they self-select reading material.
• Students will blog about the literary elements associated with the novel they are reading (D.A.D. cards).
• Students will comment on their classmates’ postings.
PRE-ACTIVITIES • The students will take a pre-test to determine prior knowledge of literary terms.
• I will review the pre-test with the students and explain the following terms, which will be defined on a hand-out:
Characterization, physical traits, behavioral traits, setting, internal (man vs. self) and external conflicts (man vs. man, nature, society, fate), types of narration (first person, third person limited, third person omniscient), parts of the plot (exposition, rising action, climax, falling action, resolution), theme
• Students will receive a packet of Deal-A-Discussion cards. These cards will serve as prompts for their blog postings.
Examples:
How does the setting affect the mood of the novel?
Explain how the main character changes in the course of the novel.
What is the main conflict, and how is it resolved?
If you were the author, what would have done differently?
Does the type of narration work well for this novel? Why or why not?
• I will model the construction of a response about theme using the short story “The Treasure of Lemon Brown” by Walter Dean Myers, which is in our textbook.
• Since students will be posting these responses to the blog and commenting on their classmates’ work, I will also show them how to comment on a response in an acceptable way. To do so, I will show them how not to respond first, using my theme sample.
WRITING ASSIGNMENT • Students will select one of the D.A.D. topics and develop a reader response based on their free read. The response must be at least one paragraph and must include specific reasons, examples, or explanation. The response also must be written in proper paragraph form.
• In addition to posting a response to a D.A.D. topic, students must also provide comments for three of their classmates’ posts. They must do so in an appropriate, respectful, and substantial manner.
EXTENSION AND ADAPTATION • Students can visit authors’ sites in order to get their perspectives of their own work. Hopefully, students can contact the author with questions or comments, perhaps even chat on a blog, since some authors provide contact information, as does Rodman Philbrick, author of Freak the Mighty:
http://www.rodmanphilbrick.com/contact.html
• Students can research how the texts are interpreted by others by looking at literary criticism. They can do a search for the text, skim the abstracts, and find sites about interpretation and analysis.
• For students that are struggling with their D.A.D. responses, I can work with small groups, taking them through a think-aloud using segments of novels or short stories, or by using a well-known fairy tale or movie.
• Students can be assigned Posting Peers; the two or three students can conference about the work that they are planning to post. These Posting Peers will assist one another not only with the ideas but also with the conventions.
ASSESSMENT • Rubric for reader-response posts
• Rubric for blog comments


LESSON #7:
INTRODUCTION While students are reading and posting their responses to the text, we will also begin to discuss creative writing techniques that they can incorporate in their own writing. They will begin to use the blog in a different way; they will use it as their Writers’ Notebooks as they incorporate these techniques.
GOALS • Students will apply Smiley-Face Tricks to their writing.
• Students will apply the Six Traits of Writing to the Writers’ Notebooks, beginning with voice, sentence fluency, and word choice.
PRE-ACTIVITIES • I will introduce the students to Smiley-Face Tricks, which I learned in a workshop given by Mary Ellen Ledbetter and can be found in her publication Strengthening Your Students' Writing and Reading
http://www.maryledbetter.com/books.htm
Some of the Smiley-Face Tricks are as follows: repetition for effect, magic 3’s, full-circle ending, similes, metaphors, hyphenated modifiers, and use of humor.
• I will also incorporate additional concepts, a few at a time, such as use of local color, alliteration, hyperbole, rhyme schemes, personification, creation of mood, imagery, flashback, use of ellipses, sentence fragments for effect, etc. Students will be given a range of topics, or they can choose their own; however, for each writing piece, they will apply a different technique. Within a relatively short time, the students will have a wide variety of writing tools and will use a range of techniques in any writing piece.
• Students will read samples provided by Ledbetter as well as samples by former students.
• Each time students write in class, I will write, too.
• Although we will read aloud some of our pieces, the intention is to have students posts many of their pieces to the blog.
WRITING ASSIGNMENT • The pre-activities and the writing assignments for the Writers’ Notebooks will go hand in hand throughout the year since I will introduce one or two techniques at a time, which the students will then apply to a topic. The topics will change depending upon what unit we are doing at the time. For example, if it is October and we are reading a poem that has rhyming couplets, then I will instruct about rhyming couplets and provide a Halloween prompt for a poem using rhyming couplets.
• As students begin to recognize techniques and authors’ styles in the books that they are reading, they will post comments and examples to the blog. For instance, I explain my writing style to my students and point out that I tend to use fragments for effect, ellipses, and magic 3’s. If they were to read my work, they would recognize these techniques, post examples of them on the blog, and explain their use.
EXTENSION AND ADAPTATION • Students can create a flip book for all of the techniques that are introduced in class. Each page or card will contain an explanation and an example of its use.
• Students can use apply different techniques to the same topic to see how the final product differs.
• Groups of students can generate a list of writing prompts that can be used for future entries. They can use the Write Source resources and the autobiography booklets that are available in my classroom.
• I can provide photocopies of various short stories or novels and review them on the overhead projectors, showing what I recognize about an author’s style. Then, I can show another piece and have them provide responses.
• I will provide my own samples for each topic, and I will demonstrate the steps that I go through as I write creatively.
ASSESSMENT • Rubric for posts for Writers’ Notebooks.
• Rubric for posts about authors’ styles


ASSESSMENTS:

LESSON # 1: PEER FEEDBACK CHART

RATE EACH STUDENT’S PRESENTATION ACCORDING TO THE THREE BEARS THEORY.
CIRCLE ONE PHRASE PER CATEGORY.

NAME OF STUDENT PACE STANCE INFLECTION VOLUME EYE CONTACT


1. TOO FAST



TOO SLOW



JUST RIGHT TOO MUCH MOVEMENT


TOO FROZEN



JUST RIGHT TOO ROLLER-
COASTER


TOO COASTER- AT-THE-END


JUST RIGHT TOO SILENT MOVIE


TOO ROCK STAR


JUST RIGHT TOO FIXATED AND FREAKY


TOO FIXED ON THE FLOOR OR THE FAN


JUST RIGHT
NAME OF STUDENT PACE STANCE INFLECTION VOLUME EYE CONTACT


2. TOO FAST



TOO SLOW



JUST RIGHT TOO MUCH MOVEMENT


TOO FROZEN



JUST RIGHT TOO ROLLER-
COASTER


TOO COASTER- AT-THE-END


JUST RIGHT TOO SILENT MOVIE


TOO ROCK STAR


JUST RIGHT TOO FIXATED AND FREAKY


TOO FIXED ON THE FLOOR OR THE FAN


JUST RIGHT


LESSON # 1: SPEECH RUBRIC – WRITTEN

SCORE OF 3 SCORE OF 2 SCORE OF 1 COMMENTS
1. Speech has a clear and catchy opening.
2. Speech is organized so that the audience can follow along easily.
3. Speech contains a variety of sentence lengths to improve fluency.
4. Speech contains enough content to last 2-5 minutes.
5. Speech has transition.
6. Speech contains details and careful word choice but is not too wordy.
7. Speech contains material appropriate for the audience.
8. Speech includes a strong conclusion.

STUDENT’S TOTAL: _____ = _____


LESSON # 1: SPEECH RUBRIC – PRESENTED

SCORE OF 3 SCORE OF 2 SCORE OF 1 COMMENTS
1. EYE CONTACT: Speaker scans the room, does not focus on just one person, the ceiling, the floor, or the material
2. PACE: Speaker does not rush; audience can follow along easily; speaker does not extend pauses
3. INFLECTION: Speaker provides pleasant and engaging changes in intonation but does not exaggerate.
4. VOLUME: Speaker does not shout, yet all audience members can hear; volume does not decrease at the end of sentences or at the end of the speech.
5. STANCE: Speaker has a sturdy yet relaxed posture; speaker does not lean, rock, sway, or pace extensively.

STUDENT’S TOTAL: _____ = _____


LESSON # 2: BOOK TALK – WRITTEN

The written piece SCORE OF 3 SCORE OF 2 SCORE OF 1 COMMENTS
1. Included title and author
2. Included information about main character(s)
3. Introduced the main conflict
4. Built suspense but did not reveal the ending
5. Concluded with a statement or question to leave audience thinking
6. Included specific and compelling word choice
7. Had variety in sentence structure and length to provide fluency
8. Found the place between too much and not enough information

STUDENT’S TOTAL: _____ = _____

LESSON # 2: BOOK TALK – PRESENTED

SCORE OF 3 SCORE OF 2 SCORE OF 1 COMMENTS
1. Student applies effective public speaking practices. X 2 X 2 X 2
2. Student has sufficient material to present to the audience.
3. Student’s content is appropriate for the audience.
4. Student looks at the audience as he opens the presentation.
5. Student looks at the audience as he concludes the presentation.
6. Student shows enthusiasm and interest in the content.

STUDENT’S TOTAL: _____ = _____






LESSON # 3: ASSESSMENT FOR PRIOR KNOWLEDGE OF TECHNOLOGY

RATE YOUR CONFIDENCE LEVEL FOR EACH OF THE FOLLOWING.
USE THIS CODE:

I = I RULE! I have used this often, so I know what I’m doing!

K = KINDA…I have used this before, but I am no expert.

H = HUH? I have heard of this, but I have not worked with it very much.

RESPOND TO EACH USING
I, K, or H
1. Word
2. PowerPoint
3. Inspiration
4. Photostory
5. Pivot
6. Excel
7. IM
8. Email
9. Webquests
10. Blogs
11. Podcasts
12. Wikis
13. iPods
14. Videocameras
15. Rotary phones
16. Pong
17. Vlogs
18. Typewriter
19. Can opener
20. Pencil sharpener


LESSON # 3: RUBRIC FOR PERSUASIVE PARAGRAPH

TEACHER EVALUATION
3 = excellent
2 = satisfactory
1 = needs improvement COMMENTS
1. Paragraph has a topic sentence that clearly states one side of the argument.
2. Paragraph includes at least three solid reasons, examples, or explanations.
3. Proof is arranged in a specific order for effect.
4. Paragraph includes transition between reasons.
5. Paragraph has a strong closing that emphasizes the point.
6. Author applies conventions well.
7. Author uses sentence variety.
8. Author uses specific and precise words.

STUDENT’S TOTAL: _____ = _____


LESSON # 4: RUBRIC FOR BLOG USE POLICY

SCORE OF 3 SCORE OF 2 SCORE OF 1
1. Statements begin with appropriate stems.
2. Statements are brief yet specific.
3. Policy incorporates school rules.
4. Policy reflects respect in all regards.
5. Policy contains no more than ten statements, no fewer than six.
6. Policy is written in a formal and professional manner.
7. Policy reflects careful thought.
8. Statements do not have errors.

STUDENT’S TOTAL: _____ = _____


LESSON # 5: RUBRIC FOR CONTRUCTED RESPONSE

TEACHER EVALUATION
3 = excellent
2 = satisfactory
1 = needs improvement COMMENTS
1. Paragraph has a topic sentence that clearly states the focus or controlling idea.
2. Paragraph includes at least three solid reasons, examples, and references to the text.
3. Proof is arranged in a specific order for effect.
4. Paragraph includes transition between reasons.
5. Paragraph has a strong closing that emphasizes the focus.
6. Author applies conventions well.
7. Author uses sentence variety.
8. Author uses specific and precise words.

STUDENT’S TOTAL: _____ = _____


LESSON # 6: RUBRIC FOR READER-RESPONSE POSTS

TEACHER EVALUATION
3 = excellent
2 = satisfactory
1 = needs improvement COMMENTS
1. Student responded to a D.A.D. card, one that he had not recently used.
2. Student used proper paragraph structure: topic sentence, support with specific information from the text, closing sentence.
X 2
3. Student included the title and author of the text to which he/she was responding.
4. Student provided insightful and observant comments.
5. Student avoided use of empty, overused phrases.
6. Student varied sentence structure and length.
7. Student applied conventions well.
8. Student used appropriate word choice.
9. Student followed blog policy and procedure.

STUDENT’S TOTAL: _____ = _____


LESSON # 7: RUBRIC FOR POSTS TO WRITERS’ NOTEBOOKS

TEACHER EVALUATION
3 = excellent
2 = satisfactory
1 = needs improvement COMMENTS
1. Student used a topic/approach that worked well for the technique.
2. Student demonstrated understanding of the technique by providing evidence of it throughout the entry.
X 2
3. Student created a title for the posting that states the technique.
4. Student conveyed his/her own voice and writing style through the piece.
5. Student incorporated techniques beyond just the new one.
6. Student varied sentence structure and length.
7. Student applied conventions well.
8. Student used vivid and dynamic word choice in order to develop a tone for the piece.
9. Student followed blog policy and procedure.


RESOURCES FOR THE UNIT

BLOGGING RULES/GUIDELINES/RESOURCES

http://adifference.blogspot.com/2006/01/safe-blogging-resources.html

http://www.cyberjournalist.net/news/000215.php

http://blue1.emerson.u98.kl2.me.us/rickshlog

http://www.seedwiki.com/wiki/teaching_with_blogs/teaching_with_blogs.cfm#Safe%20Responsible%20Blogging%20

http://chris.esc2.net/blogging/default.htm

http://yongesonne.edublogs.org/2006/09/18/another-take-on-blogging-rules/

http://www.budtheteacher.com/wiki/index.php?title=Student_Created_Blog_Policies

http://www.abpc21.org/res/BlogRules_ABittinger.doc

http://hetherington0607.learnerblogs.org/rules-for-blogging/


BLOGGING RUBRICS

www.masters.ab.ca/bdyck/Blog

http://edweb.sdsu.edu/courses/edtec296/assignments/blog_rubric.html

http://rubistar.4teachers.org/index.php

http://chris.esc2.net/blogging/default.htm#Blogging_Rubrics

http://www.catholic-forum.com/churches/cathteach/outcomes_rubric_reflection_journal.html

http://www.geocities.com/patrphil/Blogrubric.htm

6 Traits rubrics
http://rubistar.4teachers.org/index.php?screen=ShowRubric&rubric_id=1590818&
http://rubistar.4teachers.org/index.php?screen=ShowRubric&rubric_id=1170267&
http://rubistar.4teachers.org/index.php?screen=ShowRubric&rubric_id=1549627&
http://rubistar.4teachers.org/index.php?screen=ShowRubric&rubric_id=1027505&
http://rubistar.4teachers.org/index.php?screen=ShowRubric&rubric_id=1498980&
http://rubistar.4teachers.org/index.php?screen=ShowRubric&rubric_id=1402594&
http://rubistar.4teachers.org/index.php?screen=ShowRubric&rubric_id=1384854&
http://rubistar.4teachers.org/index.php?screen=ShowRubric&rubric_id=1316667&
http://rubistar.4teachers.org/index.php?screen=ShowRubric&rubric_id=1447635&


PODCASTING RUBRIC:
http://www.sites4teachers.com/links/redirect.php?url=http://www.beaut.org.au/podcastrubric3.pdf

Mr. Dudley... said...

Introduction
The aim of this unit is to allow students to incorporate blogs and wikis into a novel study utilizing the literature circle teaching method. For information on literature circles, please see: http://www.cdli.ca/CITE/lang_lit_circles.htm. The students’ learning will revolve around a novel that they select from the following list: Holes by Louis Sachar, Esperanza Rising by Pam Munoz Ryan and From the Mixed Up Files of Mrs. Basil E. Frankweiler by E.L. Konigsburg.

Goals
The students will demonstrate the depth of their understanding of their selected novel by: participating in in-class literature circle discussions, posting their reactions and responses about their reading to our classroom blog and/or our classroom wiki, and translating classroom discussions into online discussions through the use of the blog and the wiki. Students will be participating in a literacy activity while at the same time familiarizing themselves with the nature and value of blogs and wikis.

Target GLEs:
R–6–4.1 Demonstrate initial understanding of elements of literary texts by…
Identifying or describing character(s), setting, problem/solution, or plot, as appropriate to text; or identifying any significant changes in character or setting over time.

R–6–5.1 Analyze and interpret elements of literary texts, citing evidence where appropriate by…explaining or supporting logical predictions (e.g., providing evidence from text to explain why something is likely to happen next)

R–6–16.1 Generates a personal response to what is read through a variety of means … comparing stories or other texts to related personal experience, prior knowledge, or to other books.

W–6–1.4 Students demonstrate command of the structures of sentences, paragraphs, and text by…applying a format and text structure appropriate to the purpose of the writing

W–6–2.2 In response to literary or informational text, students show understanding of plot/ideas/concepts by…summarizing key ideas

W–6–3.3 In response to literary or informational text, students make and support analytical judgments about text by… using specific details and references to text or relevant citations to support focus or judgment

www.ride.ri.gov/Instruction/gle.aspx

Phase 1 “Intro to Blogs”
Introduction: The students will select a novel from the above list to study for the unit’s duration. The students will be placed into literature circle groups based on the novel that they chose. The emphasis will then shift to introducing the students to blogging in general and acquainting them with our classroom blog (mr-d-online.blogspot.com/).
Goals: The students will develop a working understanding about what blogs are and how they are used. They will answer questions, read each other’s feedback, and post comments independently at least three times per week throughout the unit.
Pre-Activities: The class will view a short video entitled “What is a Blog?” courtesy of eduwikius (www.teachertube.com/view_video.php?viewkey=ed73e571f8140dc519e0).
Working with the instructor and paraprofessional in the computer lab, the students will be introduced to our classroom blog and be walked through the process of adding a comment to it. The students will then make their first comment on the blog, answering the following prompt which will be posted to the blog: What do you predict that your novel will be about? Why did you select the novel that you did?
Writing Assignments:
1. Post a comment to the blog responding to the initial prompt.
2. Three times per week (on a rotating basis on classroom computers), the students will visit the blog, answer various posted questions from the instructor, post insights or questions of their own, and react to the posted thinking of their peers.
3. Journal entry topic - “What do you think of our class blog? Do you enjoy discussing your novel online? How is using the blog different than writing in a journal or having a class discussion?”
Extension/Adaptation: Students that do not have access to the internet at home (this is about half of my students in a given school year) will be given the opportunity to submit their comments during the school day and will be given extensions as appropriate.
Assessment: Blog comments will be tracked by the instructor and recorded as classwork grades in a simple “complete” or “did not complete” sense.

Phase 2 “Intro to Wikis”
Introduction: The class will learn about wikis and how they are used. The instructor will establish a class wiki for the purpose of discussing each novel. Each student will be required to edit his/her novel’s page on the wiki at least three times during the unit.
Goals: The class will learn about wikis, how they are used, and how they can be used to coordinate group projects.
Pre-Activities: The students will learn basic information about wikis and how to use them by watching “Wikis in Plain English” courtesy of tmsaue1 (www.teachertube.com/view_video.php?viewkey=977cd0cefdafc40175a9). Again, working in the computer lab with instructor and paraprofessional, the students will view several wikis online while the instructor highlights the differences between wikis and blogs. The students will then navigate to the class wiki page for their novel and be given time to practice editing it.
Writing Assignments:
1. Journal entry topic - “How are blogs and wikis alike and how are they different? Which do you think is more useful to a class?”
2. Throughout the unit, each student must make at least three additions to the wiki for their novel. These additions can be insights culled from their literature circle’s discussions in class.
Extension/Adaptation: Students that do not have access to the internet at home (this is about half of my students in a given school year) will be given the opportunity to access the wiki during the school day and will be given extensions as appropriate.
Assessment: Again, changes to the wiki will be counted as classwork grades in the same way as blog comments. The three additions referenced here do not include the final written piece detailed below.

Phase 3 “Interacting with Text and Peers”
Introduction: Over the course of some weeks (actual length of unit to be determined by the students’ reading skills), the students will proceed to read chunks of their novels as nightly homework assignments. Classroom time will be devoted to discussing the previous evening’s reading in their literature circles. The students will also be commenting on their readings on the class blog.
Goals: The students will read a novel, developing and enhancing their understanding of the text by participating in classroom literature circle discussions and also by responding and interacting online.
Writing Assignments: Each Monday during the unit, the instructor will post a writing prompt which can be applied to any of the three novels to the blog (i.e. “who is your favorite character in your novel and how is the author developing that character’s personality?”). The students are required to comment three times per week on the prompt – one comment being their response and two other comments being reactions to other students’ responses.
Assessment: The instructor will observe classroom literature circles and assign participation grades for each student. The instructor will maintain a checklist for completion of weekly blog comments.

Phase 4 “Producing a Formal Writing Piece”
Introduction: After reading the novel, the students will write a book review and post it to the class wiki.
Goals: To produce a thoughtful book review which includes: a summary of the plot, key ideas and concepts, some type of analytical judgment supported by references to the text, and a personal reaction.
Activities: The students will follow the normal writing process: brainstorming, writing a rough draft, revising and editing, and publishing to the wiki. In the revising stage, the students will peer-edit and also each have a teacher conference to assist and focus them in producing a final copy.
Assessment: The final copy of the book review will receive a formal writing grade based on the district-approved writing rubric.

CHSEinfo said...

Ami Sinclair
Cranston High School East
Resource/Inclusion
9th-12th Grade
widman.ami@gmail.com

Final Project

TIMELINE:
These lessons should be completed in one quarter. The lessons do not necessarily need to be completed in a sequential manner because in the resource setting. The students will need to complete each lesson by the end of the quarter. The timeline will also have to be flexible because the students often come needing help on assignments and tests that I will have to help them on. For this reason most of the lessons will have to completed on an individual basis.

STANDARDS:
Cranston High School East Academic Expectations
01 The CHSE graduate exhibits proficient communication skills.
The student is able to:
1.1 Comprehend and respond to various types of reading material.
1.2 Write effectively using standard English in a variety of formats for a variety of purposes and audiences.
1.3 Speak effectively, communicating ideas and information in a variety of circumstances.
1.4 Listen actively and critically.
1.5 Evaluate and employ a variety of visual media.
Social Expectation
01 The CHSE graduate is a respectful, ethical, responsible, and courteous individual, who can work both independently and cooperatively by following the rules outlined in the student handbook.
State of Rhode Island’s Grade Span Expectations Definitions English Language Arts
W-2 Writing in Response to Literary Or Informational Text/Understanding Plot/
Ideas/Concepts
W-2.1 selecting & summarizing key ideas to set context
W-2.3 connecting plot/ideas/concepts by referring or explaining.

W-8 Informational Writing (Reports, Procedures, or Persuasive) Using Elaboration Strategies)
W-8.2 facts & details relevant to controlling idea
W-8.3 sufficient facts & details for appropriate depth
W-8.4 addressing readers’ concerns
W-8.5 commenting on significance


LESSON 1:

Introduction:
The students will be introduced to the classroom blog. They will see that this is a learning environment where they can express their ideas. If they ever have any questions while they are home this is a place they can turn to find answers. In this lesson the students will come up with ideas of how they want their classroom blog to work.

Goals:
1. Use the classroom blog. http://chseinfo.blogspot.com/
2. For the students to decide how they want the classroom blog to be used.

Pre-Activities:
1. Show how to access the classroom blog and how it has been being used so far.
2. The students will explore the classroom blog and find other blogs that they find interesting.
3. Go through how Blogger works so that the students know how to use it.
4. Brainstorm as a group what they like and do not like on the blogs they have looked at.
5. Make a chart of what they would like to see on the blog and how they would like it to be used.

Writing Assignment:
The students will write up a proposal as to what they would like to see on the blog and why it would be beneficial. This will be written in paragraph form.

Extension:
The students need to write in all their classrooms so this will be practice for all of their other classes. Students will become comfortable with blogs and will be able to find blogs that deal with topics that they are having difficulty with.

LESSON 2:

Introduction:
Now that the students know how a blog works they will create their own blog that will be part of the classroom blog. This lesson will allow the students to personalize their learning experience.

Goals:
1. What will make learning the most enjoyable?
2. Create their own blog.

Pre-Activities:
1. Brainstorm what they enjoy about school and what their interests are.
2. Make an outline on what their blog is going to look like and what they are going to put on it.
3. Create their blog.

Writing Assignments:
The students will write a letter to their parents and to the principal explaining how they are going to be using their blog and all the educational benefits of it. They will also incorporate that they are to be trusted and will not make any inappropriate comments on their blog or any other students blog.

Extension:
The students can use their blog to help them with all their other classes. They can use their blog to help them understand concepts that they are having difficulty with.

LESSON 3:

Introduction:
The students will get practice using their blog. They will be able to use their blog in any educational purpose that they want but there are certain aspects that they are going to have to incorporate.

Goals:
1. Add to their blog what their goals are for the year and how they are going to accomplish it.
2. Make a schedule and stick to it.

Pre-Activities:
1. The students will write in their blog what they did over the summer.
2. The students will have to add a comment on another student’s blog to get comfortable with the writing style.
3. The students will then add an entry on their educational goals for the school year.
4. The students will come up with a schedule in their assignment book on how often they are going to update their blog with their educational progress.

Writing Assignments:
The entries will be their writing assignments. The entries that they make on their own blog and the comments that they leave on other students blogs.

Extension:
In all classes the students have deadlines that they have to meet for assignments. Having a blog where they have to keep current will help them follow timelines.


LESSON 4:

Introduction:
This lesson will be used with the students who are planning on going to college. This will be a place for the students to find out what will be expected of them when preparing for college.

Goals:
1. Do you know what the application process is for getting into college?
2. For the students to know what they will need to do in order to apply to college.

Pre-Activities:
1. There will be a discussion on what the students plan on doing when they graduate from high school.
2. A chart will be made on what they think the requirements are for getting into college and what the application process requires.
3. The students will write down what questions they have about the college application process.
4. The students will listen to the following podcast on getting into college.
http://www.learnoutloud.com/Catalog/Education-and-Professional/Exam- Preparation/Get-in-to-College-Podcast/6765

Writing Assignment:
Students will write a one page reflection on what they learned from the podcast. They will then write us a proposal on what they will do to plan for the college application process.

Extension:
Many of the teachers in the general education classrooms spend time showing that what they are doing in the classroom will prepare them for when they go to college.

LESSON 5:

Introduction:
The students will get accustomed to podcasts. The students will see that if they are having difficulty in a certain area they can go on the Internet and find a podcast that can clarify the problem that they are having.

Goals:
1. Find a podcast that will help them in an area they are having difficulty in.
2. Come up with a plan of a podcast that they would like to put together that would help other students.

Pre-Activities:
1. Show the students some podcasts that are already on the Internet. (Audio and Video)
2. The students will each come up with two areas that they are having difficulty in.
3. Go on the Internet to find podcast in these two areas.
4. Complete a graphic organizer on what made the podcast help them understand a topic.

Writing Assignment:
The students will make an outline of a podcasts that they would like to add to the Internet. They will have to explain the topic and how they would go about getting the information across so that other students will be able to learn from it.

Extension:
This activity will help them in the subjects that they are having difficulty in. They can even show their outline to their regular ed teacher and see if they can get extra credit.

ADAPTATIONS:
The students that are in my resource class all have different learning disabilities and difficulty in different areas. These lessons are formatted in a way that will allow each individual student to work at a pace that fits them and use the learning style that works the best for them. They can go as basic or as advanced as they would like with their blogs.

ASSESSMENTS:
School Wide Rubrics will be used with all writing assignments. They can be found on the following site http://cpsed.net/chse/2007-2008-mission-wide.doc.