Wednesday, April 30, 2008

Final Projects

Well we've come to the end of the semester. Please post your Final Project below and if you have time also post it to the wiki: http://wikidave.wikispaces.com/Final+Projects this way you will have your original draft locked into our blog and future participants will be able to add to, and improve upon, your project in the wiki. Your Final Projects will perpetually evolve, forever improving, changing, and growing.

It was a pleasure working with all of you.

Good luck, and as always, feel free to contact me if you ever have any questions.


Professionally Yours,


Dave Fontaine

Internet Librarian

National Board Certified Teacher

Educational Consultant

DaveFontaine1@gmail.com

http://professionaldevelopmentcredit.com/

39 comments:

Anonymous said...

Final Project- EDC921
Trish Degnan
Technology Educator
Woonsocket Public Schools
Woonsocket, RI 02895


Introduction: “We Wonder Wiki”
My final project is a proposal for a wiki to be used by my elementary technology students, grades one through five, to respond to literature and informational texts.

Goals:
• Students will become familiar with Web 2.0 through the use of blogs and wikis.
• Each grade level will respond to a piece of literature on my blog which will be linked to the wiki. The wiki will be used to post the literature (as a slide show or a movie), illustrations the students may create, explanations of the lessons, extensions, criteria and procedural charts, rubrics, links, and blogging guidelines for our school.

Pre- Activities:
• Students will view a piece of literature, either on Power Point or Quicktime. (see “Lessons” below)
• Students will examine my blog and discuss. All classes will generate an “Our Blogging Guidelines” document and sign a contract. This will be in addition to the district’s Acceptable Use Policy and will be signed by parents also.

Writing Assignments
• Each grade level will respond to a specific question about the piece of literature. (see below)

Extension and Adaptation
• This will be a fall activity and all classes will begin with the response to literature. Extensions could include responses to other pieces, independent student use of the blog to respond and wonder, optional use of the blog by the classroom teacher, and a response to informational text as a second technology project.
• Adaptations may include posting in Spanish, kid writing, partnered response

Assessment:
• Each grade level will follow a procedural chart and each response will be assessed with a criteria based rubric.

Other:
GLEs http://www.ridoe.com/Instruction/gle.aspx

• Structures of Language – Applying Understanding of Sentences, Paragraphs, Text Structures (W-1)
• Writing in Response to Literary or Informational Text – Showing Understanding of Ideas in Text (W-2)
• Writing in Response to Literary or Informational Text – Making Analytical Judgments about Text (W-3) (grades 2-5)
• Writing Conventions – Applying Rules of Grammar, Usage, and Mechanics (W-9.3-9.5) (grades 4-5)


Lessons:

Grade 1: No David by David Shannon

Goal: Students will independently view No David on Power Point and respond to the question:
“Why do you think David is being naughty?”

Pre-Activities: watch the power point as a class first; mini-lesson on how to navigate through a power point; discussion on inferences and prior knowledge on why a child would misbehave; mini lesson on how to type a sentence; Kid Pix drawing tips

Writing Assignment: Why do you think David is being naughty? Respond in one sentence using the sentence starter: I think David is acting naughty because… Students will type and illustrate their sentence and Kid Pix 3. Students will need to infer their answer since there are no words in No David. Class will brainstorm a list of reasons why a child might misbehave. I will post the Kid Pix responses as a slideshow to the wiki.

Extensions: Students will respond to a different piece of literature but this time to the blog. They will again illustrate in Kid Pix.

Assessment: Gr 1 Sentence Criteria (my document)
¸ the sentence makes sense
¸ begins with an UPPER CASE letter
¸ ends with a period (. ! ? )
¸ type one space between the words
¸ spell most words correctly
¸ type your name correctly

Time: 2 forty-minute technology classes
GLE: W–1–1
Students demonstrate command
of the structures of sentences,
paragraphs, and text by…
• W–1–1.1 Writing
recognizable short sentences


Grade 2: Why Mosquitoes Buzz in People’s Ears by Verna Aardema, Leo Dillon, Diane Dillon

Goal: Students will independently view the Quicktime movie (available at United Streaming) and post their response to the following question on the blog:
“According to the story, why do mosquitoes buzz in people’s ears?”

Pre-Activities: discussion of legends and folktales; mini-lesson on how to use Quicktime Viewer or Windows Media Player; review on basic word processing tasks and sentence structure; mini-lesson on how to post to the blog; “What is a Blog” lesson and create “Our Blogging Guidelines” document for Grade 2

Writing Assignment: Answer the question in two or three sentences using evidence from the story. Students will type directly to the blog.

Extensions: examine more folktales and legends; spellcheck and how to copy and paste from Word to the blog; science: use the following sites posted to the Wiki to collect facts about mosquitoes; create an informational Kid Pix slide show about mosquitoes to be posted to the wiki
http://www.sciencenewsforkids.org/articles/20040811/Feature1.asp
http://www.mosquitobuzz.com/facts/index.html

Assessment: Gr 2 Sentence Criteria (my document)
¸ sentences make sense and use appropriate details
¸ begin with an UPPER CASE letters
¸ use upper case letter for proper nouns
¸ sentences end with end marks
¸ type one space between the words and sentences
¸ spell most words correctly


Time: 2 forty-minute technology classes
GLEs:
W–2–1
Students demonstrate command
of the structures of sentences,
paragraphs, and text by…
W–2–1.1 Writing short sentences
W-2--9.4 Using correct end
punctuation in simple
sentences (e.g., period)
W–2–3
In response to literary or
informational text, students
make and support analytical
judgments about text by…
W—2—3.3 Using details or
references to text to support a
given focus (Note: support may
include prior knowledge)

Grade 3: The Pain and the Great One by Judy Blume

Goal: Students will independently view the Power Point of The Pain and the Great One and post their responses to the following question on the blog:
“Are you the Pain, the Great One or both?”

Pre-Activities: discuss making a text to self connection; discuss other family structures that might have a pain and a great one; review how to navigate through a Power Point; review on basic word processing tasks and sentence structure; mini-lesson on how to post to the blog; “What is a Blog” lesson and create “Our Blogging Guidelines” document for Grade 3

Writing Assignment: Are you the pain or the great one or a combination of both? Can you make any text to self connections? Answer these questions on the blog, making sure to cite a happening from the text.

Extensions: Tell Us About Your Favorite Judy Blume Story to be posted to the blog;

Assessment: Follow the Gr 3 Blogging Guidelines and
¸ sentences make sense and use appropriate structure
¸ use proper sentence mechanics (upper case, punctuation, spelling)
¸ type one space between the words and sentences
¸ cite evidence from the text


Time: 2 forty-minute technology classes
GLEs:
W–3–9
In independent writing,
students demonstrate command
of appropriate English
conventions by…
W–3–9.2 Using capital letters
for the beginning of sentences
and names (Local)
W–3–3
In response to literary or
informational text, students
make and support analytical
judgments about text by…
W–3–3.3 Using details or
references to text to support
focus (Note: support may
include prior knowledge)


Grade 4: The Frog Prince Continued by John Sceizka

Goal: Students will independently view the Power Point of The Frog Prince Continued, highlight text and take notes within the slideshow and post their responses to the blog:
“How many fairy tales does John Sceizka refer to in his story, The Frog Prince Continued?”

Pre-Activities: discussion the author’s other works; brainstorm a list of fairytales; watch the Power Point as a class first; mini-lesson on how to highlight text and add notes to a Power Point; review basic word processing tasks and sentence structure; mini-lesson on how to post to the blog; “What is a Blog” lesson and create “Our Blogging Guidelines” document for Grade 4

Writing Assignment: Cite one or two* fairytales the author refers to and include evidence from the text to support your answer. Use the notes you made in the Power Point to aide you in posting to the blog.
* you may list them all

Extensions: author study on John Sceizka to be posted to the wiki; write your own fairytale or “Fairly Stupid Tale”; write a paragraph in Word using the notes from the Power Point using the Response Criteria (my document); lesson on how to copy and paste from Word into the blog


Assessment: Follow the Gr 4 Blogging Guidelines and
¸ sentences make sense and use appropriate structure
¸ use proper sentence mechanics (upper case, punctuation, spelling)
¸ type one space between the words and sentences
¸ cite evidence from the text


Time: 2 forty-minute technology classes
GLEs:
W–4–1
Students demonstrate command
of the structures of sentences,
paragraphs, and text by…
W–4–1.1 Writing a variety of complete
simple and compound sentences

W–4–3
In response to literary or
informational text, students
make and support analytical
judgments about text by…
W–4–3.3 Using specific
details and references to text
to support focus


Grade 5: The Stranger by Chris Van Allsburg

Goal: Students will view the Power Point of The Stranger, highlight text and take notes within the slideshow and write a response in paragraph form citing evidence from the text to support their answer. Responses will then be copied and pasted into the blog.
“Who is the stranger in Chris Van Allsburg’s story, The Stranger?”

Pre-Activities: watch the Power Point as a class first and discuss the setting; mini-lesson on how to highlight text and add notes to a Power Point; review on basic paragraph structure; discussion and examples of how to cite evidence and provide an explanation of it; review copy/paste and how to post to the blog; “What is a Blog” lesson and create “Our Blogging Guidelines” document for Grade 5

Writing Assignment: Write a one paragraph response to answer the question. Use evidence from the text and explain your thinking. Copy and Paste your response into the blog.

Extensions: second blog post- “Did we miss anything?”’ research the legend of Jack Frost to post to the wiki; author study; science connection on snow and crystals


Assessment: Response Rubrics-The Stranger (my document)
My response is in paragraph form.
Topic Sentence
• tells main idea of the paragraph
Supporting Details
• add at least three detail sentences (facts)
• details support your main idea (they use evidence from the text) and are in your own words
• explain your reasons/thinking
Ending Sentence
• ends the paragraph by using ideas from the topic sentence
Remember to:
• Indent the paragraph
• Use end marks and other punctuation
• Use capital letters when needed
• Spell words correctly
• Use one space between words and sentences


Time: 4 forty-minute technology classes
GLEs:
W–5–1
Students demonstrate command
of the structures of sentences,
paragraphs, and text by…
W–5–1.2 Using the paragraph
form: indenting, main idea,
supporting details
W–5–3
In response to literary or
informational text, students
make and support analytical
judgments about text by…
• W–5–3.1 Stating and
maintaining a focus (purpose)
when responding to a given a
question
W–5–3.3 Using specific
details and references to text
or citations to support focus
Writing Conventions – Applying Rules of Grammar, Usage, and Mechanics (W-9.3-9.5)

Conclusion: This is a proposal and would be a work in progress- ever changing and always adjusted!

Ms. Dawn Manchester said...

Dawn Manchester
Grade 5
Warwick Schools – JB Francis Schools
dawnmanchester14@aol.com

I have enjoyed taking this journey into the world of technology with all of you and wish you a calm end to school and an enjoyable summer.

For the final project I chose a unit I have been developing for the 5th grade curriculum. I expanded it to include the technology we have been playing with all semester. It is my hope that when this unit is presented to the curriculum directors they will see the potential of learning and advance access to blog sites and WIKIs.

I will warn you now it is long and a work in progress. Only 4 lessons are included, however the entire unit is mapped out enabling the big picture to be seen.

Enjoy - Dawn

Integrated Social Studies/Language Arts Unit

Unit Theme: The Revolutionary War

Unit Overview:
The key events leading up to The Revolutionary War is the main focus of this unit. During the unit, students will have the opportunity to demonstrate their understanding in a differentiated manner. Some activities, to name just a few, are reading and responding to posted articles on the class blog, illustrating slides on KidPix or PowerPoint, cooperatively working in peer groups, writing to various informational prompts and participating in hands on demonstrations and activities.

While presenting each lesson topic, classroom time will be spent building background knowledge through group activities, teacher direct instruction and demonstration, informational reading and/or note taking. To extend their knowledge about each the lesson topic, students will be reading and responding to a linked article on the classroom blog page during center/computer lab time or for homework. (When to have students read the article (pre or post lesson) would be up to the individual teacher and/or classroom’s reading abilities)

Throughout the unit, students will be creating an on-going slide show project, acting as a Revolutionary War timeline, utilizing either PowerPoint or KidPix programs. To reveal their overall knowledge on each slide, students will include the “Big Idea” and three major key points of each event, as well as an illustration depicting the event. Students will post completed slide shows on the class blog page, for other classmates to view and critic. To culminate the unit, students will be posting a writing assignment, to a linked WIKI site, where other students will comment and respond to their ideas. The prompt for the final writing assignment is as follows:
The Revolutionary War was made up of many important events that impacted its outcome. Chose one of these many events discussed in class that you believe had the biggest impact or was a major turning point of the war. Explain your reasons for choosing the event and support your answer with text support. Also explain what the event led to and/or without this event what would the outcome of the war have been.

Grade Level Expectations Addressed in Unit:
Social Studies:
 Construct a timeline of key events of American History
 Demonstrate an understanding of key events by interpreting data presented in a timeline
 Identify different points of view about key events in early American History
 Use both primary and secondary sources to describe key events or issues in early American History
 Identify historical issues or problems in early America and explain how they were addressed
 Cite examples of authority and use of power without authority
 Identify how citizens can make their voices heard responsibly in the political process
 Recognize situations requiring conflict resolution
 Describe revenue sources for different levels of government (i.e., income tax, property tax, sales tax) and how they impact the economy

Language Arts GLE’s:
Reading
Demonstrate initial understanding of informational text by:
 Obtaining information from text features
 Paraphrasing or summarizing key ideas/plots, with major events sequenced, as appropriate to text
 Generating questions before, during, and after reading to enhance recall
 Using information from the text to answer questions related to main/central ideas or key details
Analyze and interpret informational text, citing evidence as appropriate by:
 Synthesizing information within or across text
 Distinguishing fact from opinion
 Making inferences about causes and effect
In response to literary or informational text, students show understanding of plot/ideas/concepts by…
 Selecting appropriate information to set context/background
 Summarizing key ideas
In response to literary or informational text, students make and support analytical judgments about text by…

 Stating and maintaining a focus (purpose) when responding to a given question
 Making inferences about the content, events, characters, setting, or common themes
 Using specific details and references to text or citations to support focus
 Organizing ideas, using transition words/phrases and writing a conclusion that provides closure


Writing:
In informational writing (reports or procedures only), students effectively convey purpose by…
 Establishing a topic
 Stating and maintaining a focus/controlling idea on a topic
In informational writing (reports and procedures only), students demonstrate use of a range of elaboration strategies by …
 Including facts and details relevant to focus/controlling idea, and excluding extraneous information
 Including sufficient details or facts for appropriate depth of information: naming, describing, explaining, comparing, use of visual images

In oral communication, students demonstrate interactive listening by…
 Following verbal instructions to perform specific tasks, to answer questions, or to solve problems
 Summarizing, paraphrasing, questioning, or contributing to information presented
 Participating in large and small group discussions showing respect for a range of individual ideas
 Reaching consensus to solve a problem, make a decision, or achieve a goal


Technology:
Students demonstrate an understanding of technological products and systems by:
 Safely using the required tools and organizing information resources for a specific task

Essential Curriculum Question:
1. What events in American History allowed the early settlers/colonists to gain independence from England and establish their own country?

Essential Unit Questions:
1. What were the main causes of the Revolutionary War?
2. What were the major events that lead up to the war?
3. How did the outcome of these events affect the colonists? England? The growth of a new nation?
4. What events lead to protest by the colonists? Why did the colonists protest to the King? What forms of protests were demonstrated? What effect did these protests have on the outcome of the war?
5. What different roles did the colonists take during the war?
6. What one event had the biggest impact or was a turning point of the war?

Materials:
1. 5th Grade Textbook: US History (Houghton Mifflin)
2. If You Lived at the Time of the American Revolution, Kay Moore
3. Computer Lab access to classroom blog site: e8isgreat.blogger.com

Resources:
1. Article Websites
a. www.socialstudiesforkids.com
b. www.history.org
c. http://en.wikipedia.org
d. http://library.thinkquest.org
e. www.paulreverehouse.org
f. www.kidport.com
g. www.bensguide.gpo.gov
h. www.saratoga.org
i. www.mce.k12tn.net

2. Social Studies Activities Kids Can’t Resist! (Scholastic)
3. Hands-On History: (Scholastic)
a. American Revolution
b. Colonial America
4. American History – Crafts and Games (Scholastic)
5. Differentiation in Practice, Carol Ann Tomlinson and Caroline Cunningham Eidson
6. Differentiating Instruction in the Regular Classroom, Diane Heacox

Completed Lessons Included in Unit (as of May 2007):
Lesson 1: Introduction
Lesson 2: The French and Indian War
Lesson 3: The Stamp Act
Lesson 4: The Sons/Daughters of Liberty

Lesson Topics to be Developed (most will take on similar format as lesson topics above):
Lesson 5: The Boston Massacre
Lesson 6: The Boston Tea Party
Lesson 7: Lexington and Concord
Lesson 8: The Battle of Bunker Hill
Lesson 9: The Battle of Ticonderoga
Lesson 10: The Second Continental Congress
Lesson 11: The Declaration of Independence
Lesson 12: Battle of Saratoga
Lesson 13: Valley Forge
Lesson14: Benedict Arnold
Lesson 15: Battle of Yorktown


Assessment Rubric:
 Project Rubric:
American Revolutionary War Timeline Book
Rubric
Content Illustration Conventions Neatness
4 • Strong fully developed Big Idea
• Strong supporting details
• Strongly reflects knowledge of page topic
• No irrelevant ideas • Illustration or graphic display strongly portrays page topic
• Well detailed
• Well colored or sketched Written portions demonstrates a strong use of:
• Spelling
• Punctuation
• Capitalization
• Grammar
• Sentence structure and variation Page demonstrates a strong sense of neatness in:
• Page Setup (Title, Big Idea, Big Details, Illustration)
• Handwriting
• Illustration (Details, background, color, etc)








3 • Clear Big Idea
• Clear supporting details
• Clearly reflects knowledge of page topic
• No irrelevant ideas • Illustration or graphic display clearly portrays page topic
• Good use of details
• Appropriately colored or sketched Written portions demonstrate a clear use of:
• Spelling
• Punctuation
• Capitalization
• Grammar
• Sentence structure and variation Page demonstrates a clear sense of neatness in:
• Page Setup (Title, Big Idea, Big Details, Illustration)
• Handwriting
• Illustration (Details, background, color, etc)
2 • Developing Big Idea
• Some supportive details
• Reflects some sense of page topic
• Some irrelevant ideas • Illustration or graphic display somewhat portrays page topic
• Some details
• Somewhat colored or sketched Written portions demonstrate some use of:
• Spelling
• Punctuation
• Capitalization
• Grammar
• Sentence structure and variation Page demonstrates some sense of neatness in:
• Page Setup (Title, Big Idea, Big Details, Illustration)
• Handwriting
• Illustration (Details, background, color, etc)
1 • Limited or no Big Idea
• Limited or no supporting details
• Little or no sense of page topic
• Little or no relevant ideas • Limited or no illustration or graphic display
• Limited or no details
• Limited use of color or sketch Written portions demonstrate limited or no use of:
• Spelling
• Punctuation
• Capitalization
• Grammar
• Sentence structure and variation Page demonstrates little or no sense of neatness in:
• Page Setup (Title, Big Idea, Big Details, Illustration)
• Handwriting
• Illustration (Details, background, color, etc)



 All writing will be assessed using the Warwick Schools Informational Writing Rubric and the Constructed Response Rubric.

Disclaimer:
This unit contains the first four lessons of the Revolutionary War Unit. The remaining lessons are a work in progress and take on a very similar format.

Technology is always a part of our classroom and this unit is no exception. This unit touches upon a wide variety of technology components – blogger, WIKI, PowerPoint, KidPix, and using the web as a research tool. However, obtaining access to use the blog and WIKI in the manner in which it is intended is the overall goal in developing units of this caliber, to demonstrate success using technology. The overall success of this unit truly relies on the cooperation of the Warwick School System and obtaining access within the regulations of the school system.


Lesson 1: Introduction
(2 class periods)
Lesson Objectives:
 Students will connect to the emotions of the colonists in the 1760’s.
 Students will brainstorm what they KNOW about the war.
 Students will gain some background knowledge of the war to help them devise questions about what they WANT to learn about the war.
 Students will work cooperatively in a group/peer situation.
Lesson Procedures:
1. Lesson Opener: Ask another member of your school personnel to make the following announcement to your class:
Boys and girls, you have all heard about the recent budget cuts the school department has been making. Well, we have just received notice that in order to save money the school department will be placing a tax of 10 cents on the following items:
 Jeans
 Sneakers
 Pencils
 Paper
 Eye glasses
 Milk
 Cookies
 Ice cream
This will go into effect immediately, starting tomorrow. We are aware of this distress this may cause some of you, but there is nothing we can do about it. This is being handed down from the Administration and the School Committee. If you use any of the above items your teacher, principal and other school officials will collect 10 cents on the spot. There will be a letter sent home this afternoon to explain the situation to your families. (Announcer leaves the room)

2. At this point, your class should be up in arms. Grab onto that emotion and ask the following questions and record their responses on a chart:
 How does this new rule make you feel?
 Do you think the School Department has the right to tax what you wear, supplies you use, and food you eat?
 Why do you think they came up with this plan?
 How many people think you should do something about it?
 What actions might you take to oppose the tax?
 How many of you will not pay the tax? Why?

3. Now link their emotion to that of the American Colonists they have been studying. Explain to the students that after the territorial war with the French, the King of England thought it was a good idea to tax the colonists. The King thought it was the colonists’ fault that the British Army had to defend them against the French. The colonists must have felt like you – unfairly taxed and used for their money. These feelings the colonists had, led to The Revolutionary War.

4. Use a KWL Chart to brainstorm what the students KNOW about the Revolutionary War. Continue to use the lesson opener to help students connect.
Session 2:
1. Direct instruction: Use the SS textbook to provide students with further information about the colonists’ way of life and their feelings before the King made tax laws. Read these pages aloud to the students, stopping from time to time to model tracking for the students, ask guiding questions, and record facts. Periodically, have students turn, talk, and share their reactions to what is read. Add any new material to the KWL chart.


2. Informational Text: Introduce the students to the other informational text that will be used throughout the unit: If You Lived at the Time of the American Revolution. (A mini lesson on text features may be needed with this text if students are not familiar with the question/answer format.)

3. Buddy Read: Students will now gather with their SS reading buddies to read pages 10 – 22. They will be reminded to record facts, lingering questions, and predictions that they may have before, during and after reading on reading response sheets or sticky notes.

4. Response Writing: After they have read they will discuss the information and individually respond to the prompt (response journals or blog): What action would you take against the King if you lived during this period of time? Use the unit opener situation that was presented to you as a way to connect to what the colonists went through. Also, make predictions about what actions the colonists will take and why? Support your response with material from the texts read in class.
(Modification: If a group of students need support reading the material, that group would work with the teacher to build informational text skills.)
5. Class Share: Bring the whole class back together to discuss, share their responses and record their findings on the KWL chart.
Homework: The topic of the next lesson is The French and Indian War. Students will be responsible for pre-reading the textbook pages that introduce this topic. To track while reading students will use a “Stopping Point” bookmark to record major points of text read.


Lesson 2: The French and Indian War

Student Objectives:
 Students will locate the territories both England and France had in the 17th Century.
 Students will construct a map of territory owned by England/France before the war and then again after the war.
 Students will compare the two maps to make generalized statements as to the outcome of the war.
 Students will identify main reasons for war.
 Students will predict what the English government will do now that they are in dept from the war.
 Students will be accessing the class blog to read and respond to an article posted to the blog.
 Students will develop Big Idea and supporting events of this event and use these ideas when posting a response to the blog article.
 Students will create a slide depicting The French and Indian War utilizing either PowerPoint or KidPix.
Lesson Procedure:
1. Mapping Activity: Students use the map in their textbooks to locate the areas involved and create their own maps. One map will depict English and French Territory and the other will show territory loses and gains. Students then discuss what the outcome of the war was for both the English and the French. These statements should be added to the chart.
2. Buddy Share: Students buddy up and compare their “Stopping Points” from previous night’s homework. In their discussions they are also asked to record a “Big Idea” Statement and 3 supporting facts.
3. Class Share: Gather the class to compare what each group has composed and discuss their findings. Record them on a chart as a reference.
4. Guided Instruction: Big Idea Statements and Supporting Facts/Events
 Model for students, with their input, what constitutes a Big Idea and supporting facts/events.
 Categorize the chart created from class share into significant/not significant
 Using the significant events/facts create a “big idea statement”
5. Student Practice: (computer lab – 30 mins.)
 In peer groups students read or listen to The French and Indian War article linked to the class blog
 They leave tracks of thinking by posting “stopping points” to the blog or by using the reading tracking sheets or sticky notes (these must be turned into the teacher for assessment purposes)
 Post-reading: Students must post or hand record the Big Idea Statement with 3 supporting events/facts. In addition, students respond to the posted article question: Make a prediction as to what you think the English government will do now that they are in debt from the war.
Sessions 2
1. Return to the computer lab (Before this session the teacher must review and submit all approved postings.)
2. Self and Peer Evaluation: Take 10 mins or so to allow students to post comments on their own and their peers’ postings. Have a discussion after allotted time has ended. Did they learn anything new? Did they disagree with some classmates’ ideas of big ideas and supporting events/facts? Did the article provide them with any new information?
3. Setting up Slide Show mini lesson.
• Students in this classroom already have experience in using KidPix and PowerPoint programs. If that is not the case then a few class periods would have to be spent exposing them to these programs or those similar.
• Guidelines and set up procedures will be discussed with the students and the first slide, The French and Indian War, will be done with the students step by step.
• Each slide should include:
a. Title
b. Big Idea Statement
c. 3 supporting events/facts
d. An illustration that accurately depicts the event
• Students spend the remainder of the time working on their slides with guidance from the teacher.
Homework: Textbook reading on the Stamp Act. Again students are to use the “Stopping Points” bookmark to record the major events/facts of the event.

Lesson 3: The Stamp Act

Lesson Objectives:
 Students will formulate empathy for the life of a colonist
 Students will identify reasoning for taxation
 Students will compose a letter trying to convince the members of Parliament to remove the taxes
 Students will understand what the Stamp Act was and how its installation impacted the lives of the colonists
Lesson Opener:
 Prior to students arriving place 10 small pieces of candy (M&M’s or Skittles work great) in individual cups or baggies. Also talk to 2 students and appoint them their roles as a representative of Parliament and the other the tax collector. You as the teacher can be the King of England or assign that role to another student.
 When students arrive or are getting ready for SS, hand out their bags of candy and tell them it is payment for showing up to class today. However, they can not eat their reward until the activity is over.
 Have the tax collector make an announcement that taxes will be collected for the following items:
 Jeans
 Glasses
 Jewelry
 Sneakers
 Pens
 T-shirts
 One piece of candy will be paid to the tax collector for each of those items
 After the tax collector has collected taxes, he receives 10% of the collected candy. He then needs to give 50% of collected “taxes” to the representative from Parliament for running the Empire.
 The representative has to then give 40% of the taxes collected to the King
 Once all taxes have been paid, discuss with the students how they are feeling and relate it back to the colonists and what they know about the Stamp Act.
 Record reactions on chart or refer to the one that was created in the Unit Opener.
Direct Instruction:
 Modeling reading strategies to develop the “Big Idea” and supporting events/facts by using: tracking, Stop-Think-Respond
 Source: A Summary of the 1765 Stamp Act article from www.history.org
 Guide the reading of the article for the students, modeling the reading strategies above.
 Have students practice individually while you are reading the article aloud to them. Have the students share their findings with a partner. Then bring it back to a whole class discussion.
 On the back of their article have the students record what they believe to be the big idea statement and 3 supportive events/facts.
 Create a chart displaying their ideas and again use the chart to classify and determine what the big idea and major events/fact of the Stamp Act are.
 Remind students of their responsibilities to the blog response and their slide show.
Blog Response:
 During “Classroom Stations”, Computer Lab time, or for homework students will be responsible for reading and responding to the Stamp Act article read in class.
 Response Prompt: Write a letter to the British Parliament trying to convince them to repeal the Intolerable Acts. (Post on WIKI)
 Students are encouraged to go back to the WIKI, read and respond to classmates’ letters.

Lesson 4
Loyalists V Patriots
(2 Sessions)
Lesson Objectives:
 Students will compare and contrast the 4 groups of people living in Colonial America during the Revolutionary War.
 Students will determine what impact the Sons and Daughters of Liberty had on the war.
Lesson Procedures:
 In this lesson students will be broken into 4 groups by interest. Students will be able to choose their group. Students in each group will be responsible for becoming the expert of their chosen topic, so they will be able to teach other classmates about their topic.
 Group 1: The Loyalists; Group 2: The Sons of Liberty; Group 3: Daughters of Liberty; Group 4: Neutral Colonists
• Materials: textbook, If you lived at the time of the American Revolution, articles, internet, graphic organizer
• Read, Research, and Record: Locate information that will answer the guiding questions on the graphic organizer (Who they were, What they did, What they believed, What actions they took)
• Outcome Choices: Students in the group chose one way to respond as a group, all groups must do the “All Pick” from the list below (which is presented to the students in a Choice Board format):
 Create a skit depicting the group’s actions and roles
 Create an advertisement/poster that would promote your group and want other colonists to join.
 Create a question/answer flip chart that will help others understand about your group.
 Write a Top 10 List on your topic to be posted to the blog
 All Pick: Write up a fact sheet to be handed out to the class
Session 2
 Groups continue to work on independent research and group choice project
 Groups share Choice Board Project information in one of two ways:
 Jig Saw style – where two members of each group get together and present their information
 Whole class – each group presents to the entire class
 Further information will be received when each student reads the information on the blog. All students should check the blog as a reference before their slide page is created for this event.
 Individual Response: After you have completed the group research and heard all other groups present, respond to the follow questions and post response to the blog.
 The Sons and Daughters of Liberty played a major role in rebelling against the British. What actions do you believe sent a stronger message to the King? Why? Explain your response and support it with text.
Slides: During their station or computer lab time students should be referencing the blog for helpful information – other student’s posts and articles from class – to create one slide per event.

amy_messerlian said...

Amy Messerlian
Final Project for EDC 921
North Kingstown High School
Amy_messerlian@nksd.net

The following lessons plans will be used during a unit taught about the Holocaust.

Lesson 1.1:
Objectives:
~Students will understand the plight of European Jews in the Holocause
~Students will understand and identify with the story of Gerda Weissmann Klein
~Students will tie historic themes of the Holocaust to modern-day examples of hatred, extremism, and bigotry.
Time and Materials:
One 1 ½ hour class period
Class discussion questions handout
Standards:
United States History: Understands the causes and course of World War II, the character of war at home and abroad and its reshaping of the U.S. role in world affairs
World History: Understands the causes and global consequences of WW II.
Language Arts/Reading: Uses reading skills and strategies to understand and interpret a variety of literary texts.
Langauge Arts/Viewing: Uses viewing skills and strategies to understand and interpret visual media.
Lesson Plan:
1. Tell students they will be doing a unit on the Holocaust. Give each a KWL chart and tell them they will be filling in the K and W sections today. On the overhead, put a KWL up and begin discussion on what students already know about the Holocaust (K) and once they have completed that section, ask them what they want to know about the Holocaust (W). Tell them to hold onto their KWL charts because at the end of the unit they will each individually fill in the L section to write about what they have learned about the Holocaust.
2. Give a brief introduction to frame the film: In the winter of 1945, Gerda Weissman clung to life at the end of a 350-mile Nazi death march. An ordinary teenager living in Poland, she spent six years living under German rule, three of those in slave-labor camps. She lost her parents, her only brother, her home, her possessions and community; even the dear friends she made in the labor camps, with whom she had shares so many hardships, were dead. The Nazis had taken all but her life.
3. View film “One Survivor Remembers”.
4. Have a brief discussion after the film to discuss what surprised them about Gerda’s life, etc.
5. Give handout to students with the following questions. 1. What scenes or images were most powerful for you, and why? What lessons or messages did these scenes offer? 2. How did the Nazis dehumanize Jews? How did Gerda work to overcome dehumanization, and who helped her? 3. During her ordeal in the Nazi camps, Gerda says she fantasized about enjoying a simple morning with her family or deciding what dress to wear to an imagined party. What simple things in your own life do you think you’d fantasize about if everything were taken away? What ordinary things do you think you take for granted? 4. This film focuses on the persecution of Jews in the Holocaust, but others also were murdered, including Soviet prisoners of war, Gypsies, gays/lesbians, and Communists. In what ways do you see persecution happening in today’s world? What groups do you see being targeted? What can we do to work against such prejudice and intolerance? 5. In many ways, this film is about hope for the future. Who are the heroes of the film? What did they do that makes you hopeful? What can you do to help make the world a better place? Note: These questions are designed specifically to raise themes that are further explored by future lessons and activities.
6. Have students post their response to questions 4 and 5 under a pre-determined section on the classroom blog.
7. Extension of lesson: Have students calculate a 350 mile distance from the school. On a map, have students use pins to place where the school is and the destination they chose 350 miles away. This way they can visually see the distance that Weissmann and her friends had to cover in the bitterness of winter.
Assessment Plans:
Students will be informally assessed during this lesson. Their involvement in creating the KWL chart, their input during discussion after the viewing of the film, and completion of the questions will all be considered when grading students.

Lesson 1.2
Objectives:
~Students will gain an understanding of the plight of the Jews during the Holocaust.
~Students will understand the dangers of hate and extremism
~Students will empathize with having one’s possessions taken away.
Time and Materials:
One class period
Twenty pounds of flour, sugar, or potatoes
Standards:
U.S. History: Understands the causes and course of WW ii, the character of the war at home and abroad and its reshaping of the U.S. role in world affairs.
World History: Understands the causes and global consequences of WW II.
Language Arts/Writing: Uses the general skills and strategies of the writing process.
Lesson Plan:
1. Context: In the film viewed during lesson 1, Gerda Weissmann recalls being told her family had to leave their home with no more than 20 pounds of belongings, a plight shared by many Jews.
2. Pass around the 20 pound bag of potatoes and ask students to imagine being forced to leave their homes. Tell them they are allowed to bring 20 pounds of their most precious possessions.
3. Ask students: What they would take? What would they be forced to leave behind? How would this make them feel? On what would they base their choices? Would monetary value mean less or more than emotional/personal value? Why?
4. Discuss the difference between packing for a vacation – the choices being made for a trip in which you plan to return home – compared with being forced from your home, never to return.
5. Discuss other examples – recent devastation by hurricanes in Florida and New Orleans or the wildfires in California and Florida. The use of these examples may help students understand forced departure, but be careful to distinguish between devastation caused by nature and devastation caused by human hatred.
6. Have students independently make a list of things they would bring with and have them include why they would chose those particular items.
Extending the lesson
7. Ask students to pose the same scenario to family members or guardians: You are being forces to leave your home and will be allowed to take only 20 pounds of belongings. What do you choose and why?
8. Have students’ record answers from family members/guardians.
9. Have students put recorded responses onto the classroom blog.
10. Have students write a one-page paper about their family’s responses and also have them identify the differences and similarities between their own answers and answers from their loved ones.
Assessment Plans:
Students will be accessed using a writing rubric in which they are already familiar with. This will have them understand what is expected, including proper grammar/capitalization, having a proper introduction/conclusion, details to support their statements, etc.

Lesson 1.3
Objectives:
~Students will understand the plight of European Jews in the Holocaust
~Students will deepen their understanding of Gerda Weissmann Klein’s story
~Students will be able to recognize and explain why each document is a primary source
Time and Materials:
One class period
Primary Documents envelope containing primary documents of Gerda Weissmann Klein
Standards:
U.S. History: Understands the causes and course of WW ii, the character of the war at home and abroad and its reshaping of the U.S. role in world affairs.
World History: Understands the causes and global consequences of WW II.
Language Arts/Writing: Uses the general skills and strategies of the writing process.
Language Arts/Viewing: Uses viewing skills and strategies to understand and interpret visual media.
Civics and Government: Understands the roles of volunteerism and organized groups in American social and political life.
Lesson Plan:
1. Context: Viewing and discussing the film reveals the systematic dehumanization of the Jewish people. This lesson examines humanizing vs. dehumanizing documents. When the Nazis called Jews “swine,” “dogs,” and “vermin,” they were dehumanizing them. The berating, beatings, fear tactics and both random and systematic murders were all ways the Nazis dehumanized the Jews. Words used by Nazis – “extermination” rather than “murder”, for example – also were dehumanizing, likening Jews to insects.
The love of her family kept Weissmann strong; it humanized her. So did the friendships of Ilse Kleinzahler, Suse Kunz and Liesel Stepper. When Kurt Klein called Weissmann and the other women “ladies” and invited Weissmann to go through a door before him, Weissmann described it as the first act of kindness after years of dehumanization. The same lessons can be found in documents. A family portrait taken in happier times carries a very different weight and message than a mug shot taken by the Nazis as a means of identifying and persecuting Jews.
2. Have students separate the primary documents into three groups: humanizing, dehumanizing, or neutral.
3. During the process of determining which category is best for any given document; have students answer the following questions: 1. Who created this document? 2. What was the purpose of the document? 3. Who was the intended audience? 4. What is the tone of the document? Provide evidence to support your ideas. 5. What are two or three questions that this document raises for you? How might you find the answers to these questions?
4. Extension activity: Discuss with students how Weissmann carried the photographs of her father, mother and brother in her boot during the years she was held captive during the Holocaust. Ask students to bring in three important photographs and share with classmates the importance of those photos in their lives.
5. Have students go to http://blogs.ushmm.org/index.php/COC2. Have them go to the 4/19/07 post about President Bush speaking at the Holocaust Museum. Tell students to listen to the podcast and then to explain in a few paragraphs what the purpose of the Presidents visit to the museum was and how it relates to our study of the holocaust.
Assessment Plans:
Students will be assessed through their ability to put the primary documents into the three groups mentioned above.
Lesson 2.1
Objectives:
~Student will learn about anti-Semitism
~Students will learn about propaganda and stereotypes
~Students will make connections to current-day anti-Semitism, racism, prejudice, and bigotry
Time and Materials:
One class period
Handout for definitions of “anti-Semitism” and other key words
Worksheets with examples of anti-Semitic messages
Standards:
U.S. History: Understands the causes and course of WW ii, the character of the war at home and abroad and its reshaping of the U.S. role in world affairs.
World History: Understands the causes and global consequences of WW II.
Language Arts/Writing: Uses the general skills and strategies of the writing process.
Language Arts/Viewing: Uses viewing skills and strategies to understand and interpret visual media.
Language Arts/Reading: Uses reading skills and strategies to understand and interpret a variety of literary texts.
Lesson Plan:
1. Go over the definitions of the following words: anti-Semitism, discrimination, propaganda, racism and stereotypes.
2. Have students discuss how anti-Semitism set the stage for genocide in WW II, drawing information from the film and related course materials.
3. Have students discuss how anti-Semitism and other forms of bigotry persist today, using examples from the school, community, state, nation, and world. As a starting point, have students consider how specific groups –Asian Americans, Native Americans, Latinos, Arab Americans, Muslims, immigrants, people with disabilities, etc. – are portrayed in the media, discussing the damage done by stereotypes.
4. Hand out 3 sources for students to view. Examples of these sources include, Children’s Book Cover of 1936 (Trau keinem Fuchs aug gruener Heid und keinem Jud bein Seinem Eid a.k.a. Trust No Fox in the Green Meadow and No Jew on his Oath, published by Der Stuermer – Verlag), Political Cartoon, 1938 (Antisemitic cartoon by Josef Plank, showing an octopus with a Star of David over its head and its tentacles encompassing a globe), and a Contemporary Image of Antisemitism, 2005.
5. Have students answer the following questions independently: 1. What message does the image send? 2. What stereotypes are used? 3. What can you do to counter such images and messages? (questions 1-3 can be used with any source used) Other questions should be used with the sources that fit concretely to that particular image.
6. Extending the lesson: Have students examine magazines, newpapers, websites and other materials for images that include stereotypes. Then ask student, individually or in groups, to deconstruct the images following the model used in the above exercise.
7. Have students visit the following websites to further explore anti-Semitism: www.ushmm.org (The U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum), www.yadvashem.org (Yad Vashem: The Holcaust Martyrs’ and Heroes’ Remembrance Authority), www.museumof tolerance.com (The Museum of Tolerance), www.ajc.org (American Jewish Committee), and www.adlorg (Anti-Defamation League).
8. For homework, have students visit the website http://www.amptoons.com/blog/archives/category/anti-semitism/. Have them post a comment under the “Is this image anti-Semitic?” thread.
Assessment Plans:
Students will be assessed based on their written responses to the images which they viewed. They will also be given credit for their homework assignment, which consisted of them posting a comment to a blog that I gave them the website for.
Lesson 2.2
Objectives:
~Students will explore the role of being a bystander and its moral implications
~Students will understand the plight of the Jews in the Holocaust
~Students will draw thematic parallels between the history of the Holocaust and modern-day bigotry, prejudice and persecution
Time and Materials:
One class period
A handout of bystander scenes from Gerda Weissmann Klein’s memoir, All But My Life, plus definitions
Standards:
World History: Understands the causes and global consequences of WW II.
Civics and Government: Understands the roles of volunteerism and organized groups in American social and political life.
Language Arts/Reading: Uses reading skills and strategies to understand and interpret a variety of literary texts.
Lesson Plan:
1. Post the quote by Yehuda Bauer (Jewish historian), “Though shalt not be a victim. Thou shalt not be an oppressor. But most of all, thou shalt not be a bystander.” in the front of the classroom.
2. Have students discuss, answer and list on the board their responses to the following question: Who were the victims and who were the oppressors in the film viewed during lesson 1.1. Have students define “victim” and “oppressor”.
3. Explain that in addition to the roles of victim and oppressor during the Holocaust, there also was the role of the “bystander”. Have students define “bystander”.
4. Have students individually read the three scenes from All But My Life and answer the following questions: 1. In these scenes, who were the bystanders?, 2. Did these bystanders harm or help others, or were they neutral? How so?, 3. How might different actions of the bystanders have changed the events in each scene?
5. Discuss how our roles change, from setting to setting or even within the same setting. Individuals change roles, shifting from bystander to victim, from victim to oppressor and so on.
6. Ask students: Have you been in a situation where your role shifted from one to the other? Or can you describe a time when you were one role (oppressor, for example) in one situation and another role (bystander) in a similar setting? Why did you change? How was it different?
7. Deepen the discussion of the role of bystanders. Discuss the spectrum of violence, both physical and verbal. Help the students understand that choosing to say or do nothing in certain moments can, in itself, perpetuate or even encourage violence. Allow students to draw examples from the film the handout, and their own lives.
8. Ask the following questions: 1. What happens if we are silent when we witness san act of prejudice, injustice or violence against another person? What happens when we do nothing in the face of such things?, 2. Was there a time when you were a bystander to violence, whether physical or verbal, such as a classmate being bullied. What did – or didn’t – you do? What do you wish you would have done differently?, 3. What forces, internal and external, keep us from taking actions in such moments? Are some more excusable than others? What can be done to diminish the forces that keep us from taking action?
9. Bring the discussion back to the Yehuda Bauer’s quote posted in the front of the classroom. Ask students why they think Bauer presents being a bystander as the worst role to take. Then ask if they think it is worse to be a bystander or worse to be an oppressor?
Assessment Plans:
Students will be assessed all throughout the classroom discussions and their participation throughout the discussion. Also, they will be assessed through their individual work of identifying the bystander, oppressor, and victims in Weissmann’s memoir piece.
Lesson 2.3
Objectives:
~Students will learn about the role imagination plays in their lives
~Students will write poetry, synthesizing their thoughts on imagination with the thoughts of the author, Gerda Weissmann Klein
Time and Materials:
One class period (students may take work home to complete the assignment, if needed)
Handout of imagination excerpts from One Survivor Remembers and All But My Life
Standards:
Language Arts/Writing: Uses the general skills and strategies of the writing process.
Lesson Plan:
1. Context: Gerda Weissmann often turned to her imagination when life became too horrific under Nazi rule. She believes strongly in the power of imagination as an aid and a guide.
2. Provide students with examples of Klein’s thoughts on imagination from the film, One Survivor Remembers, and from Kelin’s memoir, All But My Life.
3. Have students highlight phrases they find most meaningful. For example: “These thoughts were a wonderful escape from the present. Comfortingly the past was unwinding before me, my wonderful childhood, safe and sheltered, too sheltered perhaps for what the years ahead were to bring, but full of lovely memories from which to draw strength.” Be sure to define what a phrase is, otherwise students may tend to include long sentences.
4. Have students’ list five answers to each of the following prompts: List five of your dreams or goals and life five wonderful memories from your past. Have students go back and highlight ones they like the most.
5. Have students take the phrases they have highlighted from Klein and blend them with their own phrases to create a blended poem. Arrange the phrases to feel and sound pleasing. Place them in an aesthetic fashion like this:
A phrase from Klein
A phrase from the student
A phrase from Kelin
A phrase from the student…
Before students begin this assignment share with them a model so they understand what is being asked of them.
6. Have students post their blended poem on the classroom blog.
Assessment Plans:
Student’s blended poems will be assessed for proper format, capitalization, grammar, use of imagination, as well as if it was posted on the classroom blog once completed.

Additional possibilities to extend the unit
~1. Class can discuss the concept of “Faith in Humanity”. After brainstorming what it means to have “faith in humanity” have students understand the context of the “sheep to the slaughterhouse” phrasing. Ask students what they think might give us faith in humanity today. Ask students then to identify ways someone might put the concept of faith in humanity into actions: what steps can someone take to illustrate or encourage faith in humanity in everyday life. Give students the quote by Gerda Weissmann Klein along with the essay prompt. Gerda’s quote: “Why? Why did we walk like meek sheep to the slaughterhouse? Why did we not fight back? What had we to lose? Nothing but our ives. Why did we not run away and hide? We might have had a chance to survive. Why did we walk deliberately and obediently into their clutches? I know why. Because we had faith in humanity. Because we did not really think that human beings were capable of committing such crimes. Essay prompt: Define what “faith in humanity” means to you. Use excerpts from Gerda Weissmann Klein’s story as evidence of how she had “faith in humanity”. Do you have “faith in humanity”? Explain why or why not. Then describe ways you might put “faith in humanity” into action, making the world a better place.
~ 2. Students could complete a service-learning project where they critically analyze an issue in their community and develop a plan of action for a service learning project. Students need to understand that small steps matter and that no one can overcome a societal problem alone, but everyone can do his or her part.

ClareO said...

The Rhode Island Project
Clare Ornburn
4th Grade Teacher
Ashaway Elementary School
Ashaway, Rhode Island 02804
Clare.Ornburn@chariho.k12.ri.us


Introduction

During the course of this unit 4th grade students will be learning about all aspects of the state of Rhode Island. They will research all of the counties of the state and the differences between these counties. They will discuss how different cultural aspects have shaped each county. Through their research they will learn about the historical people and places that each county is known for. Students will learn about the different industries the state of Rhode Island is known for and how those industries shaped our state as well as the early United States. This unit will be on going through out the school year and will culminate with the creation of an on-line travel brochure that may be used by people wanting to visit Rhode Island or simply learn more about what our state has to offer.


Standards Addressed in this unit:

SS/US/4.0: The student understands the emerging factors that contributed to the early development of the United States.

SS/US/6.0: The student understands the transformation of the United States through industrialization.

SS/WG/1.0: The student understands how to use maps and other geographic representations, tools, and technologies to acquire, organize, and report information from a spatial perspective.

SS/WG/2.0: The student understands how physical and human characteristics shape a place.

SS/WG/4.0: The student understands how culture influences people’s perception of places and regions.

Technology communications tools/4.0
Students use telecommunications to collaborate, publish, and interact with peers, experts, and other audiences.

ELA/RD/3.0: (E1c) The student reads and comprehends informational materials to develop understanding and expertise and produces written or oral work. (ES, MS, HS)

ELA/RD/5.0: (E1d) The student demonstrates familiarity with a variety of public documents and produces written or oral work. (MS
)
ELA/WR/11.0: (E2a) The student produces a report. (ES, MS, HS)

ELA/SLV/18.0: (E3b) The student participates in-group meetings. (ES, MS, HS)

ELA/CGU/22.0: (E4a) The student demonstrates an understanding of the rules of the English language in written and oral work and selects the structures and features of language appropriate to the purpose, audience, and context of the work. (ES, MS, HS)

ELA/CGU/23.0: (E4b) The student analyzes and subsequently revises work to clarify it or make it more effective in communicating the intended message or thought. (ES, MS, HS)





Goals of this unit: Students will…

· Describe similarities and differences in the ways people live in Rhode Island.
· Understand ethnic origins and identify ethnic groups of Rhode Island.
· Explain the history of Rhode Island past and present.
· Use the Big 6 method to research historical places in Rhode Island such as the State House. (E2a)
· Compare and contrast the lives of Americans who influence the development of Rhode Island.
· Locate various landforms and bodies of water in Rhode Island.
· Identify geographic boundaries in villages, towns, cities, and counties. Identify Rhode Island historical and cultural groups.
· Analyze current events in Rhode Island.
· Describe changes in Rhode Island that have occurred over time. Compare organizations established in Rhode Island.
· Use the Big 6 method to research various groups that were established in Rhode Island. (E2a) Explain the structure of Rhode Island’s state government.
· Discuss the roles of elected officials in Rhode Island.
· Discuss the economic growth of Rhode Island over time.
· Explain the economics of Rhode Island.
· Discuss the impact of transportation on Rhode Island waterways.
· Identify Rhode Island symbols.
· Students use telecommunications tools (online discussions and Web environments) and online resources for collaborative projects with other students inside and outside the classroom who are studying similar curriculum-related content.
· Students use a variety of media and formats to communicate information and ideas effectively to multiple audiences.
· Restate and summarize information (main ideas, supportive details)
· Relate new information to prior knowledge and experience
· Extend ideas
· Make connections to related topics or information
· Compare information found in maps, charts, tables, graphs, diagrams, etc.
· Produce an expressive, imaginative, and informative piece of writing





Pre-Activities

Rhode Island KWL Chart

Each student will be given a hard copy of a KWL chart (what I know, what I want to know, what I learned). On an overhead we will fill in the What I know and What I want to know portions of the chart. This will help me assess where I need to begin activate any prior knowledge my students may have.

Rhode Island Scavenger Hunt

To begin this unit and introduce the state of Rhode Island students will participate in a Rhode Island scavenger hunt. This will familiarize the students with the state’s counties, cities, towns, landforms, and bodies of water. Students will be given a tourist map of the state of Rhode Island and a copy of the following worksheet. They will work in partners or small groups to locate the places on the worksheet. They will use sticky notes to mark each item on their maps.

Once all groups have completed the scavenger hunt we will meet in the larger group to compare results and review the information on the worksheet. Students will correct their work and change any incorrect answers on their maps. This work sheet will be used as a study guide for the first Rhode Island quiz.


Rhode Island Scavenger Hunt



1. Find the grid coordinates for each of the 8 Rhode Island cities.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
2. Name a bay, an ocean, and a sound that are in our around Rhode Island.
1.
2.
3.
3. What are the coordinates for Ashaway?


4. Name 2 multi-lane highways in Rhode Island.
1.
2.
3.
5. What city is east of the island of Jamestown?


6. What is the northern most city in Rhode Island?

7. What 2 states border Rhode Island?
1.
2.
8.On what island is the town of New Shoreham found?


Rhode Island State Symbol and Trivia Quiz
www.chariho.k12.ri.us/faculty/riordan/ri/index.html

This is a site developed by a retired Chariho teacher. The quiz reviews the state symbols and gives a brief account of why each symbol was chosen. It also goes through some Rhode Island trivia and tells some interesting and lesser-known information about our state.

Rhode Island Cities and Towns Quiz

On this same site is a cities and towns quiz. The quiz goes through some interesting information about Rhode Island and gives students a sense of how Rhode Island developed through the years. In this section of the Website is also a listing of all the cities and counties in with links to each of their websites. This site will become a valuable resource when students begin their research and development of their brochure.


Return to KWL Chart

At this point we will now revisit the chart again and fill in anything that we think may important in the What I learned portion of the chart. We are now ready for our first writing prompt on our classroom blog.



The Project Begins

The Blog

www.mrsornburns4thgrade.blogspot.com

Writing Prompt #1

Now it is time for the first writing prompt. All prompts will be conducted on our classroom blog. The first prompt will be pretty general.
“What is your favorite place in Rhode Island and why?”
All students will be required to respond on the blog. If they do not have internet access at home, class time will be allotted for this activity. Students may also use the Library/Media Center computers to fulfill this requirement. I will assess these prompts on the 6+1 write traits rubric developed by the Ashaway Elementary School teachers. Students will have a copy of this rubric in their writing folders





The Wiki

I will develop a wiki page that will introduce our Rhode Island brochure. Students will be put in small groups and each group will be assigned a county of Rhode Island: Providence, Kent, Bristol, Washington, and Newport.

As each group gathers information about their county they will develop their own wiki page that will be linked from my page. Students will have access to their page from home or from school. With each research assignment the county pages will grow with information that the students find. Each group member will assigned a job with in the research. The county pages will grow through out the year with each new research assignment.

The end result will be a wiki brochure about Rhode Island and it’s counties. It will include historic information, economy, government, industry, and tourist attractions including the lighthouses of Rhode Island. Each research assignment will be graded with the following rubric.



Good (4-5 points)
Content · Content is appropriate to the assigned topic.

Accuracy · All information is accurate is linked to a coinciding Website.

Creativity · Information is displayed in a very creative manner. (photos, video clips, podcasts)

Conventions ·
All grammar, spelling, and capitalization are correct. Fair (2-3 points) · Most of the content is appropriate to the assigned topic.

Most information is accurate and linked to a coinciding Website.

· Some information is displayed creatively.

· Most grammar, spelling and capitalization are correct.
Poor (0-1 point)
Content does not relate to the assigned topic.
· Information is not accurate or is not linked to a coinciding Website.
· Information is displayed in a very routine manner.
· There are many grammar, spelling, and capitalization errors





The Research

Assignment #1

The first research assignment will be to find the towns and cities of their county and the significant historical people, places, or events that are connected with these cities or towns.

Extensions:
Reading:
Something Upstairs, Avi
Finding Providence, the story of Roger Williams

Possible field trips:
Slater Mill, Pawtucket
Gilbert Stuart Birthplace, Saunderstown
Astor’s Beechwood Mansion, Newport
Avi tour, Providence Historical Society
John Brown House, Providence Preservation Society



Assignment #2

Choose 3 towns or cities in your county and research the government. Please include how the town is run, who the state representatives are for the city or town, and who are the current leaders in the town.

Extensions:
Guest speakers:
Ashaway town council president
State Representatives from Hopkinton
Senator Jack Reed

Possible Field trip:
Rhode Island State House, Providence









Back to the Blog

Writing Prompt #2

Choose a town or city in your county and write a “noun” poem.
Step1: Begin your poem with the name of your town or city.
Step 2 Find 10 nouns that best represent your town or city, for example if I was doing Westerly I might choose the word carousel because one of the oldest carousels in the country is locate there.
Step 3 Match each noun with an adjective(s) that best describe the noun, i.e.; historical, wooden carousel.
Step 4: End your poem with the name of your town or city.

Share your poem on the blog and let us know what you think of other people’s poems.

Extension:
Record your poem and podcast it from your wiki page.



Research

Assignment #3

Research the lighthouses in your county. Find several pictures of your lighthouse(s). If possible, get pictures from different angles. Find the following information about your lighthouse:
· Who/what it is named after
· Whether or not it is still working
· Location
· Any other interesting bits of information
Post this information on your wiki page.

Science connection:
Construct a working model of a lighthouse in your county. You may use any materials of your choosing. Try to be creative! It needs to “look” like the lighthouse you chose; however, it needn’t be an expensive venture. Use the knowledge you have about creating a closed circuit and a switch to help you with the wiring. I will supply you with a light bulb, wire, and a battery. You will be graded with the following rubric on this assignment.




Good (4-5 points) Information · Who or what the lighthouse is named for.· Whether it is still working.· Location of light house· Extra information.· More than one picture of the lighthouse is included.

accurate· There may not be any extra information.· There is one picture of the lighthouse.


· Lighthouse model strongly resembles the actual lighthouse.· Lighthouse lights up.


· Project is original, creative, and colorful.· Project is well thought out and put together.· Project is handed in on time.

There are little or no spelling, punctuation, or grammar mistakes.· All information is written in complete sentences.

Fair (2-3 points)
· It is unclear how the lighthouse received its name.· It is unclear if the lighthouse is still working.·

· The lighthouse model somewhat resembles the actual lighthouse.· The lighthouse is wired, but does not light up. ·

Presentation · Project could be more creative and colorful.· More thought should have gone into the project. · Project is one day late.

There are some spelling, punctuation, or grammar mistakes.· Some things are not written in complete sentences.


Poor (0-1 point)
The location is not · There is no information about the name.· There is no information about whether it still works.· There is no information about the location.· There is no extra information.· There is no picture.

Lighthouse The model does not resemble the actual lighthouse at all.· The lighthouse is not wired.

· Project lacks creativity.· Very little thought has gone into this project.· Project is more than one day late.

Conventions · · · There are many spelling, punctuation, or grammar mistakes.· Most things are not written in complete sentences.





Extensions:
Create a slide show of photographs for your wiki page showing your lighthouse from different views.
Travel to your lighthouse to learn more about it.
Assignment #4

Research the major industry in your county. Are there any mills? Are the mills still running, and if so what do they produce. If the mills are closed, is there anything in those buildings now? What about tourism? Several of our counties depend on tourism as a major industry. What attractions are in your county that might be of interest to people visiting Rhode Island? Post your information on your wiki page.





Blog Entry


Writing prompt #3

If you were a tourist, where in Rhode Island would you like to visit? Why would you want to go to this place? Have you ever been there before?

Conclusion

As the school year progresses students will continue to research different aspects of Rhode Island. Each research project will be posted on the wiki as part of our online Rhode Island brochure. Wiki pages will have links to websites that tell about different places in Rhode Island. Students will continue to blog about Rhode Island and respond to my posts. This project will be assessed with each research assignment and each writing prompt. My plan would be that this could be an ongoing project from year to year with each class adding more to the wiki as we continue our research about Rhode Island.

D. Cunha said...

Final Project-EDC921
Diane Cunha
Sixth Garde Teacher
Community Preparatory School
Providence, RI 02907

The unit idea was to use approved on-line adult tutors to give the students feedback on their narrative writing.
When the writing is completed students will make a podcast of their pieces.

I see that my personal comments about my unit are not italisized so I will put an * before them insead.

*I used the school’s new content management system called Mambo.
http://www.mambo-foundation.org/ information about Mambo
http://atschool.communityprep.org/ the school’s web site

Class: Sixth grade
Time Frame: 5 – 9 lessons using the computer lab approximately 45 minutes each time
Preactivities:
• Students, teacher and guests tell stories “with a point” at morning meeting time.
• Older students visit and read their narrative pieces to the sixth grade students.
• Students share collections of writing territory ideas from their Writing Journals.
• A professional storyteller visits the class to demonstrate the art of telling a good story.

Goals:
Students will write a good narrative piece about an incident that happened to them or a family member.
Students will identify the necessary parts of a good story
Students will use the stages of the writing process to write the story

Students/teacher will become familiar with the blog feature on the school’s web site
Students/teacher will communicate appropriately with on-line tutors
Students/teacher will consider and use some of the tutor’s suggestions

Lesson 1: The blog
Give instructions on the use of the school blog including:
Safety review
User names and passwords
Logging on
Starting and naming your piece (new topic)
Commenting and replying etiquette
Copying and pasting
Students
• Log on
• Try our the features of the blog
• Start a new topic and name the subject. This will show up in the “Subject” column.
Tutors
The teacher will respond to tutors’ questions, comments and concerns by email.

*Improvements: I will get the tutors set up on the site earlier because a number of them had problems figuring it all out. There are a lot of buttons and tabs to click. I’m improving the instructions I sent out to the tutors as well. I will also post my lessons on the blog rather than emailing them, so the tutors can read what the class focused on that day.

Lesson 2: Consider audience & purpose
Audience
The school community, those who have access to the school web site: tutors, students, families, teachers and invited guests.
Purpose
Tell a story that has a point and is interesting to your readers, maybe something dramatic, ironic, humorous, surprising, or emotional.
Students
• Come up with a minimum of 2 story ideas. Choose incidents that can be told in 1 or maybe 2 paragraphs.
• Write a brief summary of each story and list the characters and important events you want to include.
• Write questions to your tutor asking for advice.

Tutors
Give suggestions on your student’s ideas.

*With the next class I will be more specific with the tutors about what they should look for, although some tutors were fine others could have used more direction.

Lesson 3: Choose a story
What ideas make for a good story? or
How can you make your idea into a good story?
“Who cares?” “What’s the point?”

Students
• Read and consider your tutor’s comments and/or suggestions.
• Choose the story idea you will develop.
• List specific details and vocabulary you might want to use (descriptive language, similes, metaphors, strong verbs, specific nouns and precise modifiers). Think about how you will make your readers visualize your story.
• Write a topic sentence that hooks your reader into your story; this could also be left for later.
• Choose your point of view, first or third person.
• Continue with your prewriting or start a draft.
• Write questions to your tutor asking for advice.

*It was probably about here I figured out the students should contineu/improve their writing as a “reply” to the tutor’s comments. This would have kept all postings under one subject heading! It would have been easier on everyone.

Lessons 4 and 5: Drafting
Students
• Read and consider your tutor’s comments and/or suggestions.
• Copy the writing that you want to continue and paste it into a reply to your tutor’s comment. Continue the drafting process.
• Work on your draft
• Strive for clarity. Make the picture clear for your readers.
• Incorporate the specific details and vocabulary
• Write questions to your tutor asking for advice.

*The students figured out for themselves that they should write in Word and then paste it into the reply. They felt this was a “secret” they should keep from me!

Tutors
Comment

Lesson 6: “I think I’m done!” or “I’m done!”
“I think I’m done” guidelines:
Does the story have a hook?
Is the story easy to understand? Are events arranged in chronological order?
Is the story told from a single point of view?
Does the story contain strong verbs, precise nouns and specific modifiers that help your reader visualize your story?
Is your language appropriate for the audience and purpose?

Edit the piece for capitalization, punctuation and spelling.
Student
• Make final revisions and edits.
• Give your piece a heading marked FINAL with the date
• Thank your tutor for the help and suggestions.

Tutor
Make final comments

Lesson 7: Reading out loud
Demonstrate the reading of students’ papers for editing and for recording
For editing- Read what is written, including misspellings, run-on sentences, repeated words, punctuation etc.
For recording- Listen for loudness, enunciation, speed and tone.
Students
• Form groups of 2-3 students.
• Practice reading your own and your partner(s) papers out loud. Give feedback to each other and correct any mistakes.
• Practice reading your own paper out loud.

Lesson 8:
Make and listen to a practice recording.
The class will give feedback to individual student recordings.

Lesson 9:
Making a podcast.
*I don’t have all the issues worked out for the podcast yet, but I believe they will be completed by the end of school. Some issues have to do with Mambo and how to post to that system. I found information on the web and sent it to our IT teacher, and he thought I could get it to work. If that doesn’t work out, I will put the podcasts somewhere else. I’m using Garageband to record.

*Benefits
The students were eager to communicate with the tutors and to use their suggestions.
An adult could look at and make suggestions during each step of the writing process, and that adult wasn’t me!
The tutors will communicate with me directly about things they have noticed. For example one tutor asked if his student was an ESL learner because her replies to him were not well written. She is not an ESL learner. At the start of the next class I reviewed with students what I’d heard from “the tutors” as a general comment to the class, reinforcing the idea of being careful with their editing and postings.
*Difficulties
There was a logged on time limit, which some students went beyond and lost their work.
Some students did not push the “post” button when they were finished and lost their work.
The previous problem also confused the tutors who could not find the “new writing.”
Tutor issues: signing up/registering, lost password, checking the writing daily (for one week); it took about 4 days to get all the tutors going, so some students were wondering, “Where is my tutor?”
My issues:
Not being familiar enough with the blogging feature; improvements for class 2 will be: the subject title can be a simple “Diane’s Story” and we’ll keep all writing and replies under one subject heading.
Writing clear directions so the tutors can find where the students’ writing is; there’s quite a few buttons to “click.”
Using Word for the writing and then copying and pasting.
Figuring out the podcasting.

I have not adjusted the rubric to include the podcasting yet.

*The formatting for the rubric was "lost in translation" so I removed it. DC

Have a wonderful summer.

MDavis said...

Final Project -EDC921
Mark Davis
Reading Specialist
Barrington High School

INTRODUCTION
The following ideas were in my proposal and then executed a few months ago. I encourage you to review them and visit my site. The hope of this project is to continue research into the effectiveness of technology such as Web 2.0 tools on reading comprehension and student writing.

UNIT GOALS
Through identification on an item analysis of our mid-term exams, we assessed that students in this course needed more support with GSE R-4.1 Initial
Understanding of the Literary Text which includes Identifying or describing or making logical predictions about character(s) such as protagonist or antagonist, and setting. We also wanted to incorporate more opportunities to assess students’ ability to present information in an oral presentation. Specifically, we wanted to address GSE OC-2.1 Oral Presentations, where students are exhibiting logical organization and language use, appropriate to audience, context, and purpose. Most of all, we wanted to provide learning styles-supported artifacts of student work through self-selected authentic tasks. Using technology, we ensured that students participated in meaningful summaries of their learning that would engage their peers. For more information on these products, please review the documents in the Project Resources – Handouts section of the online website (instructions at the end)


STANDARDS
Aside from the previously mentioned standards, the following standards have been addressed through in-class work:
National Standards:
NET-S Performance Indicators (4, 5, 6 for grades 9-12): Students routinely and efficiently use online information resources to meet needs for collaboration, research, publication, communication, and productivity.
NCTE and IRA Standards 3 and 8: Students apply a wide range of strategies to comprehend, interpret, evaluate, and appreciate texts. Students use a variety of technological and information resources (e.g., libraries, databases, computer networks, video) to gather and synthesize information and to create and communicate knowledge.
Rhode Island State Standard:
Writing GSE 9-10, 14.4: Using a range of elaboration techniques (i.e., questioning, comparing, connecting, interpreting, analyzing, or describing) to establish a focus.

Reading GSE 9-10, 13: Apply comprehension strategies before, during, and after reading literary text.



SYNOPSIS OF LESSONS

The following lessons are breif summaries of the activities completed during the unit. Although this is not a complete list, it will provide some background on how to scaffold the lessons of the unit with the technology and material needed to be covered. Some lessons required several days to complete (such as literature circles) and others were assigned as on-going homework (blogging).
Lesson One: Practicing for Text Analysis
Essential Question: Do we control our destiny or is it decided for us?
Brief: Provide a copy of a brief narrative with two characters and a direct plot. Have one teacher read the story aloud and interject comments regarding the actions or feelings of the character(s) as they occur. The interjections, a text-based inner dialogue, should model good reading comprehension. After each page, the teacher will facilitate predictions for the following sections of the story. Using the gradual release of responsibility technique, students should be expected to finish the reading with their own notes on actions and feelings and make predictions. Students were then introduced to weblogs or blogs. In class, students were asked to post their Actions and Feelings notes from the Checkout story for homework. Students then responded to their peers to receive feedback or coach struggling learners. This activity will serve as an assessment and practice for future homework assignments.
Objectives:
* Students should be able to identify characterization aspects within the story.
* Students should be able to make logical predictions about the story’s outcomes.
* Students should demonstration analysis of the story against an essential question.
Resources:
* Lesson on Making Predictions handout, the story “Checkout” with teacher annotations
* Mr. Davis’s Online Classroom course website, students technology survey and blog form (www.davisclassroom.com)

Lesson Two: Choosing a Text
Essential Question: What types of responsibilities do teenagers have?
Brief: Beginning with a parking lot activity, students use the white board to post teenage responsibilities with Post-Its. The group discusses and groups together the top concerns of teenagers. The teacher will facilitate the discussion and direct student students towards a gallery walk of the six texts the students can choose from. Each text was checked for readability for all learners in the class and provides multiple perspectives for all genders, ethnic backgrounds, and content. Students will bring home a permission slip for parents to ensure approval of content and to provide an explanation of differentiated instruction practices incorporated into the unit. An explanation of the unit will be provided with book summaries for additional review of the options.
Objectives:
* Students will be able to make connections between their life and texts they are interested in reading (motivation).
* Students will be able to make choices that match their learning styles.
Resources
* Book Teaser handout (brief synopsis of story)
* Parent Letter for Outside Reading Project (permission slip and explanation)
* Julia Steiny Support for Lit Circles article (providing validity of assignment)

Lesson Three: Preparing for Student-Facilitated Discussions
Essential Question: Each day, students will generate their own questions in literature circles. The overarching essential question throughout this exploration will be: How are you responsible for their actions and feelings for yourself and others around you? This essential question comes from a UbD-supported curriculum written for all K-12 English teachers in the district.
Brief: Students will learn how to participate in literature circles and chalk talks, both in a traditional and digital format. For literature circles, each students will participate in a revolving role where they must read a section of their book (deadlines and lengths selected by their group) and come prepared to present their role to the group. In a “save the last word for me” fashion, the group responds to their materials first, and then allows the author to share what they were feeling or thinking when they recorded their responses. Each day, members bring together their understanding through the guidance of the “Discussion Director’s” guided questions. Samples of questions for each text are provided here:
* How does the character know where she should belong (with her family, friends, community)?
* How does the character cope with people ignoring her?
* How do we try to fit into the molds of other people?
* How does our perspective change the way we see people?
* Why do people often hurt themselves when they are upset or don't fit in?
Students are also given the homework assignment of participating in self-guided weblog sessions online. Each section allowed students to create their own blog topics or responded to an author- or teacher-initiated response. Students received credit based on a check-plus, check, or check-minus assessment of the quality of response. Check-plug entries included cited evidence, check entries only provided feedback, and check-minus went off task or made an attempt.
Resources
* Students’ text
* Literature Circle Role Sheets

Lesson Four: Creating an Artifact
Essential Question: The teacher will remind students to focus discussions on the essential question: How does your character show they are old enough to be responsible for their actions and people around them?
Brief: Teacher will model an effective oral presentation using the essential question as a guiding point. Students will be given an opportunity to choose from one of six suggested presentation artifacts or propose their own idea. Each group will be evaluated using a rubric for the presentation, another rubric specific to their chosen artifact, and given an opportunity to provide peer participation feedback. Time will be given to review literature circle role sheets, blogs, and in-class discussions to support the collection of evidence and information for the presentation.

Resources:

* Oral Presentation Project handout, outlining requirements and highlighting artifacts

* Presentation Rubrics, the first page focusing on presentation skills and the remaining pages for the specific artifact being presented.

Lesson Five: Culminating Writing Assignment
Essential Question: How does your character show they are old enough to be responsible for their actions and people around them?

Brief: Students will learn about the writer’s workshop model when drafting a summary paper connecting their own experiences with the character in their text. Although citations and evidence were collected for the oral presentation, students will be graded on their ability to connect their ideas to their own experiences with effective transitions and analysis of the text. The students’ papers will be assessed with the school-wide writing rubric (cannot be posted due to rights restrictions within district)

Resources

* Practice Writer’s Workshop packet


CONCLUSION

Most of the materials suggested above were tested fully with two classes during the month of March in a Freshmen English course at Barrington High School. Though seeing the experience is more effective in person, I have included access to my school site so that you might see evidence of their work. Please feel free to e-mail me with questions or feedback at davism@bpsmail.org if I can be of service.

Visit: http://www.davisclassroom.com
Username: edc921
Password: fontaine

Click on Lang and Lit 112 – Ms. Blake’s Period 1 Class to enter the online course. You can see the Resources documented above by clicking on Project Resources, then the Handouts folder, posted under the image of the textbooks. Thank you and best wishes!

Pam B said...

Final Project (I also posted this on Dave's wiki.)
http://quickstartguides.pbwiki.com
http://nwiowamediacatalog.blogspot.com/

Introduction: For my final project I did not create a unit since I am not currently in the classroom. In place of a unit, I created the wiki that I proposed in Deliverable #3. In 2006, the Iowa State Legislature reinstated teacher librarians into the Iowa code. As a result of this legislation, each school district is now required to employ a certified teacher librarian and also have a library program in place. In response to the mandate, AEAs in Iowa are planning a series of professional development opportunities for teacher librarians. The professional development sessions will aid teacher librarians in incorporating the components of the new law. In addition to the professional development that will be offered, I created a wiki as well, to assist teacher librarians in addressing the new requirements. The wiki will be a vehicle that can be used to post information, provide links to helpful professional materials as well as a place where teacher librarians served by Northwest AEA can collaborate and share ideas and documents with their colleagues and peers. Because teacher librarians and programs have not been required for many years, schools and the personnel they hire will require some assistance implementing the new requirements. The wiki will serve as a useful site where teacher librarians can seek help.

I used PBWiki to create my wiki simply because it was the one I knew best and also time considerations this summer made it the best choice. It can be viewed at http://quickstartguides.pbwiki.com

I also added some “movies” to the blog I created earlier. Again, because of time considerations I used a program I had used a little before, Snapz Pro X. It was already installed on my computer and it was the one I used in the past. At some point in time, I want to redo the movies I created using another program. I also want to learn more about podcasting so I can include that tool in future efforts. The address of my blog is: http://nwiowamediacatalog.blogspot.com

Goals:
• To enable teacher librarians served by Northwest AEA to become a community of learners by using a wiki.
• To provide teacher librarians served by Northwest AEA an instrument to easily share information with each other.
• To provide access to professional materials and relevant web sites that will assist teacher librarians in Northwest AEA to meet the new state requirements and mandates.
• To keep teachers, staff and administrators informed about changes to the Northwest Iowa AEA Online Media Catalog and the resources available to them via the online catalog.

Pre-Activities:
Before teacher librarians can use effectively use the wiki, they will need some training. At the first professional staff day, teacher librarians will be introduced to the wiki and will be provided a demonstration on how to use the wiki. A help sheet with illustrations will also be given to teacher librarians along with links to tutorials that they can use at their convenience at a future time. Other wiki sites will also be shared with the teacher librarians, so they will appreciate the educational potential of wikis.
• How to create your own PBWiki in 5 minutes educators.pbwiki.com/f/PBwiki+-+How+to+create+your+own+PBwiki+in+5+minutes.pdf
• What’s a PBwiki? yummy.pbwiki.com/f/Q&A%20about%20PBwiki.pdf
• PBWiki: Frequently asked Questions educators.pbwiki.com/f/PBwiki++Frequently+Asked+Questions.pdf
• You Tube PBWiki videos (12) http://www.youtube.com/profile?user=ramitsethi
• Thrive in 2065? Reinventing Schools for the 21st Century teachdigital.pbwiki.com/f/reinventing-schools-duncan-09may07.pdf
• The Hows of Wikis geekyartistlibrarian.pbwiki.com/f/HowOfWikis_2-2007.ppt

Librarian Wikis: • TeacherLibrarian Wiki: http://teacherlibrarianwiki.pbwiki.com
• LM_Net Wiki Annex: http://www.lmnet.wikispaces.com
• Texas School Librarians' Wikispaces: http://txschoollibrarians.wikispaces.com
• Library Success: A Best Practices Wiki: http://www.libsuccess.org.
• South Carolina Library Association: http://www.scla.org
• ALA (American Library Association Professional Tips Wiki Main Page: http://wikis.ala.org/professionaltips/index.php

Writing Assignments:
This wiki is divided into four main sections: Communication and Leadership; Curriculum, Teaching and Technology; Reading and Literacy (K-12 emphasis); and Collection Development. On each page I’ve provided suggestions for sharing. While not a “writing prompt”, I’m hoping the suggestions will provide a starting point for teacher librarians to share ideas and resources related to the main topic of each page.

Extension and Adaptation: In the first year of inception I think the wiki will primarily be used to assist teacher librarians in meeting the new state guidelines and mandates and create a spirit of cooperation and community. Once the first year passes, I hope it will continue to be a place for collaboration and sharing of ideas, concerns and successes for teacher librarians in Northwest AEA. Since AEAs across the state of Iowa are planning similar days of professional development, the wiki could potentially be used as well by teacher librarians regionally or even by teacher librarians across the state of Iowa.

Assessment: The success of the wiki will be judged by usage. How many teacher librarians have used the site? How many ideas have been shared? At the professional development days at the AEA, input will also be sought from the group. What are there thoughts about the wiki? Is there anything that would make the wiki better and more useful for the group?

pwestkott said...

Final Project EDC 921
June 2007
Pamela V. Westkott

Grade/Content Area – Grade 3 – Social Studies
Unit’s Title - Narragnsett – Yesterday and Today
Length of unit: one month

Overview of the Unit- “What does it mean to belong to a community?” is an ongoing strand throughout our units of study in third grade. As a final investigation into this theme, we closely examine our own town through its history and how it impacts who we are today.

This unit contains lessons in all content areas. It culminates by expecting students to choose a project that demonstrates what they’ve learned and to contribute to a class book of Narragansett’s history. New additions to the unit are including Web 2.0 tools.

Lessons in this unit address these questions:
Lesson 1. What do we think we know about our town? What do we still wonder about? What if it’s fact or opinion? How do we know?
• Partners search for information online.
• Students create a question web using Kidspiration software
• Introduce ”Exit Card” to be completed every day by each student. These are bound into a booklet.

Lesson 2. What makes Narragansett a community? How does it compare with other kinds of communities?
• Understandings: rural, suburban, and urban
• Compare/contrast three types of communities using a tertiary Venn diagram

Lesson 3. Where do we live?
• Reviews mapping skills- directions,
• Introduces scale and coordinates for locating neighborhoods, villages, physical and political features

Lesson 4. What does all the data about our Narragansett say about us?
• Conduct online search of town’s website and InfoWorks website
• Select one descriptor, such as population, and do a comparative study over time.
• Analyze data to determine what it means
• Construct a digital graph
Lesson 5. Who are the Narragansetts?
• Examine the Narragansett tribes’ website and other bookmarked ones
• Compare: select one topic, such as histories of tribe with early English settlers, celebrations, language, customs, roles, etc.; record findings on a Venn diagram
• Understandings- town and our school are named for tribe; people in our community & school are tribal members

Lesson 6. Why is our state called, Rhode Island and the Providence “Plantations”? Who were our “planters” and how did they shape our history?
• Read about Englishman who was granted large tracks of land from Queen Anne of England – Rowland Robinson and Hannah’s tale.
• Debate what we think about slavery
• Produce small group tableaus about slavery.

Lesson 7. Why do we need a standard way to
measure things? Or, how tall was a Narragansett Pacer?
• Read historical article about the Narragansett Pacers, horses that were bred by the Narragansett planters. Since these horses were “only 16 hands high” we need to determine what that means.
• Share text: How Big is the King’s Foot?
• Deduce why a standard for measuring is
necessary by first estimating and then measuring things in the classroom.

Lesson 8. Why do waves break near our beach?
• Develop physics behind forming waves.
• Construct wave bottles and hypothesize about what we notice.
• Complete graphic organizer and compose a
poem about waves to be compiled into a class book for our first grade buddies.

Lesson 9. How come it’s called “the Pier” when there aren’t any piers?
• Read historical articles about “the Pier” area of our town.
• Differentiate between the three piers that once existed and rank them by their uses.
• Infer why this area is still called “the Pier”.

Lesson 10. What changed Narragansett Pier from a rural community to a summer haven for tourists? Why is it called the “Golden Age” of the Pier?
• Understandings – transportation: Narragansett Pier Railroad, Casino and Towers, “grand” hotel, fire on September 12, 1900.
• Groups select and research topics
• Then report what they’ve learned.
• Debate how Narragansett changed over time.

Lesson 11. How different were Kate Chase Sprague and Inez Weed Sprague?
• Research these two historical figures.
• Assign roles and have students act out parts.
• Differentiate between these two women based on their contributions to our town.

Lesson 12. How can Point Judith’s light be seen 16 miles out at sea?
• Understandings – Fresnel lense, light source, focal point, convex vs. concave, prism, reflected, and refracted light, main beam, flashing sequence, concentric
• Show model & hypothesize how beacon works
• Conduct experiment found at
http://www.narragansett.k12.ri.us/NES/Narragansett/ lighthouse.html
• Record conclusions in science journal.
• Create a digital diagram of a Fresnel lense.

Lesson 13. Ghost stories –True or False? What do you think? How can you support your thinking?
• Read history of Point Judith Lighthouse and consider the legend of Judith’s ghost.
• Speculate if this story is true or not.
• Construct a lighthouse and compose a legend.

Lesson 14. What does it mean to be a citizen, to be governed?
• Research online what type of government the town has.
• Complete graphic organizer of Council-Manager format
• Introduce town meeting format and assign roles.
• Pose a problem to be considered.
• Respective officials meet and discuss problem and their role in resolving it.
• Record notes, arguments and conclusions
• Convene meeting so groups can report out their findings.
• Town council leads and voters decide.
• Debrief what happened.

Lesson 15. What is a silhouette? How can we design our own about “Olde Narragansett”?
• Determine what a silhouette looks like.
• Examine exemplars with students with these prompts: What do you notice that this student has done well? How were they able to do this?
• Students create their silhouettes.

Lesson 16. Final projects: How can we share what we now know about Narragansett? How will we assess what we’ve learned?
• Interpret “Think-Tac-Toe” designed to give students a required component and choices.
• Require all students to contribute one chapter to our class book about Narragansett. Assess writing with Grade Three Writing Rubric. Every student creates illustrations and cover of book.
• Introduce other demonstration choices, such as brochure, PPT, drama or puppet show, songs and games played in 1900, newspaper, old style journal, series of postcards, audio tape, video, etc.
• Analyze rubrics: establish criteria, determine expectations of how to meet or exceed the standard, demonstrate pride in work, reexamine exemplars for projects.

Grand Finale! Students play Whose the Expert?, a Jeopardy-style game to showcase their expertise about our town.
•“Exit Card” booklets that students have written their entries in since the first day of unit are collected.

Culminating Field Trip- Tour of Narragansett:
Robinson House-URI School of Oceanography-old South Ferry Church & graveyard-Towers-Central Street-Druids’ Dream-Sherry Cottages & Kentara Green-Earle’s Court water tower-Hazard’s Castle & tower –Ocean Road historic district-Point Judith Lighthouse-Galilee fishing village-Town Hall: mural, chambers, offices.

Lesson 14: What does it mean to be a citizen of
Narragnsett?

Grade/Content Area: Grade 3 -Social Studies
Length of Lesson: 3 - 45 to 60 minute sessions
GLE’s/GSE’s:
NETS 4,5: Students will use online resources to participate in collaborative problem solving.
G&C (Gr.3&4) 1-2: Students demonstrate an understanding of sources of authority and use of power… by identifying authority figures within local government and demonstrating characteristics of leadership and fair decision making. (DOK 2)
G&C (Gr.3&4) 3-2: Students demonstrate an understanding of how individuals and groups exercise (or are denied) their rights and responsibilities by…working cooperatively in a group to complete a task and explaining different ways conflicts can be resolved. (DOK 2).
G&C (Gr. 3&4) 5-3: Students demonstrate an understanding of how choices we make impact and are impacted by…explaining the pros and cons of personal and organizational decisions. (DOK 2)
W-3-6: In informational writing, students organize concepts/ideas by…grouping ideas and arrange them in a logical manner. (DOK 2)
W-3-7: In informational writing, students effectively convey purpose by…stating a focus/controlling idea on a topic. (DOK 2)
W-3-8: In informational writing, students demonstrate use of a range of elaboration strategies by…naming, explaining and comparing information pertinent to topic. (DOK 3)
W-3-9 …Correctly use conventions (DOK 1)

Context of Lesson: We will apply our understanding of our town’s Council-Town Manager model of government by working through a problem that the we actually faced: an injured coyote was frequenting our school’s surrounding area – including the playground. Practical application of a real-life situation should have been meaningful. Students cite this as “one of their proudest things” we did this year.

I love the earnestness of third grade students, all of which our media specialist captured on video. Clips from this video will be edited into our class Blog. We hope to share this with town officials, showing them how third graders can govern, too!

Opportunities to Learn:
Materials: Bookmarked Websites such as
http://www.narragansett.gov
http://riedc.com/riedc/ri_databank/31/284/

Video clip that demonstrates how a town meeting functions
Digital projection system & computers
Paper, pencils, note cards, highlighters
Individual copies and overhead of graphic
organizer listing town officials
Desktop tented cards announcing name of role they are playing
Laptop for Town Clerk to take notes
Gavel for Chairperson
Microphone
Podium
Video equipment (& videographer)
Classroom Environment:
Mini-lesson-Class gathers at meeting area on rug for introduction and to view sample town meeting
Desks are clustered by sub-organizations within town government, such as town council, school committee, safety officers, etc.
Students work collaboratively following expected group norms.
Teacher(s) monitor group work to determine how work is going and who needs help.


Differentiation of Instruction:
Since the act of writing is differentiated, the fluent writer is encouraged to create and explore, while the emerging writer is supported for continued development.

Some specific ways to differentiate are:
• Know your student writers through on going assessment that guides my teaching and learning for each student. Individual conferences are essential.
• For students who need written language support (per IEP, 504, ELL, Title students):
- Meet with the individual and while listening to student’s ideas, record key words or phrases the writer can use to work on while writing independently.
- Provide audio taping at the Listening Center.
• Challenge the fluent writer through questioning, provoking the student to reach beyond what is on the page. Model how this writer can coach others in their group.
• Be prepared! Know the resources being used and the roles of each town government official.
• Review cooperative learning strategies with any group having difficulty working so they can reach a common objective.

Depth of Knowledge: As indicated with the GLE’s and GSE’s for Writing and Social Studies, students are engaged in both basic and complex reasoning at different times throughout this lesson.

Objectives: Students will…
1. Identify the Council-Manager” form of government as the leadership of our community.
2. Take notes and write a persuasive piece about how they view issues raised during discussions. This writing must explain rationale for their decision, include supporting evidence and summarize their point of view (POV).
3. Present their arguments for the decisions they can or cannot support during the open forum of the meeting.
4. Listen respectfully and thoughtfully to arguments presented during the meeting.
5. Accept the council’s vote on the issue.

Instructional Procedures:
Day One- (40 minutes) Pre-requisite for Day Two.
1. Disseminate individual copies of spreadsheet.
2. Introduce graphic organizer that lists official structure of town’s government. Review the respective roles each official has been charged to fill.
3. Students work online with a partner to complete their spreadsheet about the town’s government. Names of each officer are to be filled in as they work with a partner. Remind students that this will become a portfolio entry.
4. Reconvene as a class to share what has been learned. Using an overhead (OH), students report names of officials. Teacher and students record on the OH their findings while reviewing what each official’s role is in our government.
5. Students are informed that this information will be significant during following day’s lesson. Papers are held in students’ folders.
6. Announce that we will hold our own town meeting tomorrow and that roles will be assigned today, permitting students to consider what their job means and how they might need to act.
7. Teacher will meet with each student during another time of the day to assign roles and discuss the responsibilities of the official they are playing.

Day Two: Opening Hook & mini-lesson (15 minutes)
1. Teachers engage in a role-playing scenario where they present an issue for students to vote upon that directly affects them, only to have teachers disregard the results of the vote and unilaterally change the outcome.
2. “Tell us how you feel about our decision? (Pause for student responses) How could we have acted differently?”
3. Discussion continues as students consider these prompts: “Let’s think about what is means to be a citizen? What rights and responsibilities do we each have as citizens? (This is building on work that we have done throughout the year.)
4. Introduce a brief video clip of an actual town council meeting. Set purpose by telling students to notice what the meeting looks and sounds like. “At the end of this clip we will debrief what we’ve noticed.”
5. After viewing the video, have students share their observations and call for any questions they are wondering about at this time.

Engagement: (30-40 minutes)
*Caveat-Students have been told that Mr. Jennings, our media specialist will be filming our meeting. This is a routine practice, but it is important to review how we act during filming.

Part One: Set up purpose for the work.
1. “We are faced with a serious problem at our school, one that has impacted all of us. Because of the wounded coyote that has been seen by the town’s safety officers, we cannot go outside for recess.”
2.“What if we convene a Town Council meeting right here in Room 25 to discuss the issues and how we would resolve this problem? Let’s begin thinking about it. Safety officers and local citizens are deeply concerned. And, an animal rights group, PETA, has gotten involved because they don’t want the animal hurt.”
3 “Remember that during a public meeting, all points of view must be addressed and discussed before a vote can be taken. However, since this problem is serious, we must take swift action to resolve it.”
4. Students move to their respective seats and meet with their groups. They are using problem solving skills and the information about our government.
5. Explain how doing further research is encouraged and note taking is expected. (Students have gone online to learn more about coyotes and PETA.)

Day 3 (45-60 minutes)
1. Direct students to take all documents and materials they need as they move to their assigned spaces. Tented cards should be on desk or table top in front of them, announcing who they are.
2.Town Council president convenes meeting. “Pledge to Flag” is said. Problem is presented, followed by Open Forum, during which each respective constituency speaks to the issue before the council.
3. Council president seeks final thoughts from each official as each participant summarizes their own POV. Finally the Town Manager is asked for his analysis. After discussion, vote is taken and council president announces decision. Meeting is adjourned.
4. Debrief the process with students.
5. Collect all notes and persuasive pieces written by each student, if they are completed. They may be completed the next day during Writer’s Workshop.

Follow-up:
At a time that is convenient, Mr. Jennings will edit the video with small groups of students. When completed, we will view it before it is added to our class Blog and shared with the Town Council.

Assessment:
Student writing will be assessed as students and teachers use the Third Grade Writing Rubric to score their persuasive pieces. An observation checklist will be completed to record how students follow directions, worked cooperatively, remained on task and were actively involved. Watching the video provides another way to determine how each student contributed to the process.

Extensions:
Students wanted to have a follow-up meeting, reporting back as to how the problem was resolved. They also insisted on having another meeting with a different issue. We chose to address one our town faces: How to deal with rubbish? Town-wide collection? “Reduce, Reuse and Recycle” program? So we did have a second meeting after reassigning roles. They loved it and we witnessed how well they worked through the problems, acting like responsible, involved citizens we hope they will always be.
We look forward to what reactions we might receive in comments made on our Blog and from our own community. This is government in action.
In reflection, I’ve decided that a template should be created to help guide students how to organize a persuasive piece. I’m working on that.


Lesson 16 – Final projects:
Grade/Content Area: Grade 3 – Social Studies

GLE’s/GSE’s:
NETS (5,6) Determine when technology is useful and select the appropriate tool(s) and resources.
W-3-6: In informational writing, students organize concepts/ideas by…grouping ideas and arrange them in a logical manner. (DOK 2)
W-3-7: In informational writing, students effectively convey purpose by…stating a focus/controlling idea on a topic. (DOK 2)
W-3-8: In informational writing, students demonstrate use of a range of elaboration strategies by…naming, explaining and comparing information pertinent to topic. (DOK 3)
W-3-9 …Correctly use conventions (DOK 1)
W-3-10 Works through the writing process (DOK 3)
HP1: Students act as historians using a variety of sources and interpret series of connected events.
HP2: Students connect the past with the present as they chronicle human events, diverse people and the societies they form.
HP2: Students make personal connections and understand how the past frames the present and future.

Context of the Lesson: Writing this book is a culminating project for the unit of study about our town’s history. We all contribute to its creation. We are expected to synthesize all that we have learned and retell Narragansett’s history in our own style.

While this book has been an annual project, I now want to use Web 2.0 tools and add a whole new dimension to the work- to first construct a Wiki about Narragansett and then create a Podcast to demonstrate how much we’ve learned. My hope is that the online community can contribute more information about Narragansett on the Wiki.

Opportunities to Learn:
Materials:
Props for the “hook”: stuffed peapod and fishing pole with line, but without actual hook.
Hale, S. (1980). Narragansett Bay: A Friend’s Perspective. Templeton, MA. Adams Printing.
Historic and Architectural Resources of Narragansett, RI. (1991). RI Historical Preservation Commission..
Latimer, S. (1997). Narragansett-by-the-Sea. Dover, NH. Arcadia Publishing.
Latimer, S. (1999). Narragansett in Vintage Postcards. Charleston, SC. Arcadia Publishing.
Narragansett- Yesterday and Today. (2003). Text written by previous students and this teacher.
• newspaper articles
• collection of oral histories, postcards, journals
• mobile lab
• digital projection system
• paper, pencils, highlighters, etc.
• Word Wall, Quick Word Books
• individual copies of Third Grade Writing Rubric

Classroom Environment:
• Introduction –class gathers at meeting area on rug.
• Student desks are clustered together.
• Students may use any resources available to them and work at any classroom space.
• Students work collaboratively following expected group norms.
• Teachers monitor group work to determine how work is going and who might need intervention.
• Table where teacher confers with student-writers

Differentiation of Instruction:

An effective Writer’s Workshop is truly differentiated. The emerging writer is fully supported and the fluent writer is encouraged to stretch and explore beyond where he/she is at this point in time. The act of conferring differentiates instruction based on what the writing needs. Specific ways to help students are:

• Know your student writers through on going assessment that guides my teaching and learning for each student. Individual conferences are essential.
• For students who need written language support (per IEP, 504, ELL, Title students):
-Meet with the individual and while listening to student’s ideas, record key words or phrases the writer can use to work on while writing independently.
-Provide audio taping at the Listening Center.
• Challenge the fluent writer through questioning, provoking the student to reach beyond what is on the page. Model how this writer can coach a partner or others in their group.
• Be prepared! Know the resources being used.
• Cooperative learning strategies for Writer’s Workshop already exist, following the same conferring model that is used while meeting with a student. Children practice how to be Writing Partner
• Using technology is an equalizer. Students challenged in academic areas often shine using technology tools.

Depth of Knowledge: As indicated with the GLE’s and GSE’s for Writing and Social Studies, students are engaged in both basic and complex reasoning at different times throughout this lesson.
Objectives: Students will:
1. Synthesize what they learned about their topic and work through the writing process to compose a chapter for the class book.
2. Learn what a Podcast is and how it is created.
3. Plan out and write a script for their segment of the Podcast.
4. Practice recording their segment and self-evaluate their performance using NES fluency rubric. Revisions and editing follow.
5. Publish their segment’s writing on the Podcast.
6. Decide within their group how the Podcast is organized and what respective roles they have.
7. Work with technology and media specialists to finalize production.

Instructional Procedures:
Prerequisites: Students have been researching and developing their understanding of Narragansett’s history. Each student has selected one topic that they will be responsible for composing a chapter in our class book. They will continue to be the resident expert on this topic when they place their writing on the Wiki and we develop our Podcast
Creating this Wiki will be a class project. We will begin by viewing a tutorial during our time in the Tech Lab. I have found some examples of Wikis for us to examine, noticing what they have stylistically and content wise. As we consider our objective –showcasing what we know and think about Narragansett- we can decide what and how we plan to develop the wiki. Much planning and thinking still needs to be done before I actually attempt this with students.

Day One: (45 to 60 minutes). Introduction & Hook
Teacher will share props with students: a stuffed peapod and a fishing pole without real hook. While “casting” the fishing pole, I’ll pull in the tied-on peapod and ask students:
"If I were to join these two together, what compound word would they create? Here’s a hint: It is a technology word for a Web 2.0 tool. (Pause for answer or tell students.)
So what might a Podcast have to do with ourstudy of Narragansett? We are going to create one! What do we already know about Podcasts? Let’s look at what some 5th graders from California have created."

http://www.murrieta.k12.ca.us/tovashal/bcoley/coleycast/podcast.info.htm

This is a *****link!!!! Begin with tutorial, “What is a podcast?” and then view examples. There’s even one about their town. Murrieta, California. Follow-up with an analysis of what students have noticed. Teacher records students’ ideas as they watch the monitor. These elements can be turned into criteria for our own production.

Along with discussion, have students complete template that sequences steps for planning and implementing. Steps may include:
1. Deciding who is working individually or within a group.
2. Planning and drafting a segment of the broadcast.
3. Selecting a broadcaster- person speaking.
4. Choosing a host – responsible for introduction and providing the “hook” to excite the listeners and lists the segments included in Podcast.
5. Conferring with writing partner(s) and teacher/director to polish the written segment and then revising/editing finalize piece for publication.
6. Text of broadcast is typed into the Wiki.
7. Group decisions to be made, such as music to be used, order of segments and when we’re ready for production.
8. Assess readiness by having rehearsals: each individual broadcaster reads and records their piece and then listens to assess performance. Also, the group’s production must hold “run-throughs” of the whole broadcast. The group must reach consensus about if they are ready.

Assign groups and set students off to begin working. Using bookmarked educational student-created podcasts, children may wish to examine some other examples.

Day Two: (45 -60 minutes) Podcasters-at-Work!
After groups have made initial decisions about what to include, and who will do what, guide students to begin planning and drafting their segments. Teachers monitor students while they work.

Conferring will be done at the table. Students come to conference with a designated purpose for meeting. This fosters writer to reread and reconsider writing before meeting with adult.

Teacher listens to student read and discuss the writing. Initially share what you like about the writing. Then offer one suggestion for the student-writer to consider for revising.

If this is a final conference, student should come having already self-edited writing or edited with a writing partner. This fosters accountability for correctly using conventions. Follow same format for all conferences before moving on to a final edit prior to publishing. This is completed with student writer who makes all editors’ marks on paper.

Before ending session, groups will reconvene to assess their progress and plan for next day’s work. Each group can then report to whole class and raise any questions that need clarifying.

Day Three: (45-60 minutes)
Session begins by meeting on the rug for a check-in to determine where everyone is working today. Management plans are to work with one group at a time. If others are waiting for a conference, they can go through their writing notebooks and return to anything else they had been working on earlier. It is Writer’s Workshop.

Actual recording of the broadcast will need to be at a scheduled time convenient to all parties. I find that students even are willing to give up a recess time. Having optimal conditions for recording are critical. We hope to eliminate background noise which hard to do in schools!

Assessment: Other than standard use of rubrics for writing and group work, I understand that this is an area needing the most development. I’ll begin searching for ideas about how educators are assessing work (and the working process) as students create blogs, wikis and podcasts.

Students will use our Third Grade Writing Rubric, to self-assess their writing. I will also evaluate the writing so we can confer together, sharing what we both think.

I will be looking closely at attempts made at revising, something I expect student writers to be doing this late in the year.

I have anecdotal notes that I make while/after conferring with students. These include date, reason writer asked for the conference, name of piece, what I liked and what writing needs. These notes are done on a double-sided weekly sheet. Each student has a square on the grid in which notes are recorded. I find this is an easy way to “see” the week, guiding instruction.

Checking-in before work begins to clarify things and the all-important debriefing that follows a session are key pieces of informal assessment.

Extensions: In terms of the technology, I guess I have more questions than answers at this time. I view these lessons serving as introductions to using Web 2.0 tools. The overall goal is for our students to create their own projects, first with support and eventually independently.

Having us write a reflection will be required. It should have us react to how it feels to be “published” online. What it means to know that anyone in the world can read our work. How while that may bring a great deal of pride, we may wonder what responsibility that causes as well. Meeting to share our thinking will follow.

msaunders said...

Introduction:
Since I am a high school library media specialist, all my teaching is done in collaboration with the classroom teacher in conjunction with the curriculum. Getting teachers to plan ahead with me, rather than show up the day before, sometimes the day of, with a lesson plan and a quick description of the class’ needs, is a challenge. All 300 freshmen are offered an orientation to the library through their English classes. I have been asking the English teacher to devise a lesson that requires some research and I’ve incorporated the orientation session into that research assignment. Probably because this requires additional effort by the teacher, some freshmen get their orientation to the library in the spring after some of them have been using the library with and without their other classes for months. Since the high school is the only school in the Gloucester system with a library, this is the first experience in a school library for most of the students. This school year, I plan to use the following short vocabulary unit with those English classes whose teachers aren’t ready in the fall to invent a research lesson in order to get their freshmen oriented to the library.
Because the unit is fairly simple with minimal writing responsibilities, I chose for this class to do something that should be of considerable use to the library media program at Gloucester High School. It addresses the difficulty I have getting teachers to preplan library research with me. I have begun a wiki for information literacy instruction collaboration at https://gloucesterhslibrary.wikispaces.com I will link to the wiki from the library’s Web pages. Teachers who want to collaborate will be given the right to alter the wiki so that we can build the lesson together. This should get around the difficulty of finding mutually available planning time. So far, the wiki has a link on some department’s page to a list of the Massachusetts frameworks that apply to research in that discipline. Some pages will have lessons that have been used in the library during previous years. Other pages will have lessons that look promising from lessons I found on the Internet. I have a page of resources that the library is considering for purchase and I plan to add a page to introduce recently-acquired resources that I can link to from my monthly library email newsletter. I am also building a page of links to sites with good information literacy-related lessons. The beauty of having this project as a wiki is that interested teachers can add to this page as well. Another outcome that would benefit our students would be teacher discovery of the potential for use of wikis in their classes.
Search-a-Word Vocabulary Unit for freshman library media center orientation at https://gloucesterhslibrary.wikispaces.com/Search-A-Word and below.
I am aware that this small instructional unit doesn’t fully meet the assignment criteria. I could have invented a more complex unit, but it would not be likely to be of use to me at my school. Instead, I hope that the wiki, which I will use, will suffice to make my final project satisfactory.

Goals:
1. To link vocabulary instruction in freshman English classes with orientation of freshman to the library resources available at the high school.
2. To familiarize students with the vocabulary found in the text they will be reading for English class.
3. To introduce students to the use of a blog for a class writing assignment.
Essential Questions:
1. What resources are available in the school library media center (LMC)?
2. How can a student access those resources?
3. What information can be obtained about a single word in the English language using the LMC?
Content:
1. Tier 2 Vocabulary words from the current book to be read in English class.
Skills:
1. Location of information within the LMC and in computer resources.
2. Understanding of basic library organization.
3. Knowledge of the existence of proprietary online resources available through the LMC and public library.
4. Use of a blog for a writing assignment.
Assessments:
1. Completion of worksheets 1 and 2 (see links in lesson one and two). 25% each
2. Classroom blog entry for assigned word Scoring for Blog entry.doc 26%
3. Participation in classroom discussion "The most dynamic word from the blog." Rubrics for group discussion and debates.doc 24% of grade
Pre-activity:
1. In classroom, in groups, students identify and build a list of words in the text that are unfamiliar.
2. Teacher assigns, or has students pick, individual words from the list to research.
Lessons:
Lesson One: Library introduction
· The library media specialist (LMS) presents the rules, procedures, and lay-out of the LMC.
· Classroom teacher models the search for resources about the book the class is reading using the LMC catalog with help from the LMS.
· Together the two teachers model finding answers for Word Search Worksheet 1.doc.
· Students find answers for their own word among the LMC print resources.
Lesson Two: Computer resources introduction
· LMS presents school rules about computer use.
· LMS and classroom teacher model use of online resources for Word Search Worksheet 2.doc.
· Students find answers for their own word on LMC computers.
Lesson Three: Blog entry
· Teachers present and discuss with class: nature of blogs, use of blogs in education, classroom assignment using blog.
· LMS demonstrates class blog (prototype: http://searchaword.pbwiki.com/FrontPage, password = ghs ) while classroom teacher asks students for possible reasons why a word could be interesting or dull. Those suggestions will be logged onto the designated blog page to model blog entry procedures.
· Once students have completed their text entry, they may take time to finish their worksheets, or, if done, add images or otherwise embellish their blog entry. Students will be urged to "lock" their entry once they are finished.
Lesson Four: Debate "The most dynamic word on the blog"
· Groups of 3-5 students read through the blog for homework.
· Groups decide which word the group will sponsor and elects a spokesperson who will convey the groups' arguments.
· Each group registers their word with the teacher.
· Each spokesman gets 2 min. to present. Class votes.
Essential understandings
1. Each word in the English language has an origin and history
2. The library has resources for information beyond Google.

Extensions:
1. Students will go on to read the assigned book with some knowledge of unfamiliar words and tools for finding the meaning of other unfamiliar words in the LMC.
2. The tools students used in this assignment will be used again in other visits to the LMC with and without their classes.
Adaptations & differentiated instruction:
1. To be provided in response to the IEP of any special education or handicapped students in the class.
2. Library computers are equipped with text reading software and text enlargement software.
3. Classroom teacher, LMC, and library aide will all be available to assist individual students.
4. Visual learners will be encouraged to work with the images feature of the blog.

Standards:
1. 9-10C.24.05 ~ Research ~ Formulate open-ended research questions and apply steps for obtaining and evaluating information from a variety of sources, organizing information, documenting sources in a consistent and standard format, and presenting research.
2. 9-10L.03.14 ~ Oral Presentation ~ Give formal and informal talks to various audiences and for various purposes using appropriate level of formality and rhetorical devices.
3. 9-10L.04.24 ~ Vocabulary and Concept Development ~ Use knowledge of Greek, Latin, and Norse mythology, the Bible, and other works often alluded to in British and American literature to understand the meanings of new words.
4. 9-10L.04.25 ~ Vocabulary and Concept Development ~ Use general dictionaries, specialized dictionaries, thesauruses, or related references as needed to increase learning.
5. 9-10L.05.29 ~ Structure and Origins of Modern English ~ Describe the origins and meanings of common words and foreign words or phrases used frequently in written English, and show their relationship to historical events or developments (glasnost, coup d’├ętat).

msaunders said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
msaunders said...

Oops, my links to documents didn't come through. I will try again. The links below refer to worksheets and rubrics referenced above in my lesson.
Word Search Document #1 http://docs.google.com/Doc?id=dfm4j22_21f6tbzw
Word Search Document #2 http://docs.google.com/Doc?id=dfm4j22_22hs3tw9
Rubrics for group discussion and debates http://docs.google.com/Doc?id=dfm4j22_24fbbx89
Scoring for Blog Entry http://docs.google.com/Doc?id=dfm4j22_23ddw72v

Michael Skeldon said...

FINAL PROJECT
Michael Skeldon
Academic Dean
Beacon Charter High School for the Arts
Woonsocket, RI 02895
mrskeldon@aol.com

My deliverable provides a great amount of detail that is best seen at http://campus.digication.com/mrskeldon/Overview.

Though not strictly a “Teaching Unit”, this piece is intended to frame the integration of digital portfolios into the school’s graduation requirements through the Capstone project.

According to the RI Department of Education, the Capstone project is an “in-depth, independent learning experience in which students investigate an area of personal interest. The capstone presentation is a required component of a capstone project and offers students an opportunity to showcase their work to an external audience. In Rhode Island, these projects are the culminating event for achieving a Certificate of Initial Mastery.” (www.ridoe.net/highschoolreform/ dslat/exhibit/exh_glsry.shtml)

Though Beacon classes are constructed on a semesterized schedule (complete courses are approximately 80 minutes long but are completed within one semester), students will have the opportunity to begin work on their Capstone project throughout the academic year.
Semester 1 serves as an overview of film theory and history, but students begin to explore ideas for their project. Semester two intensifies the Capstone work. For a complete list of deliverables and their deadlines (http://campus.digication.com/mrskeldon/Deadlines).

The work will be introduced gradually in lessons that are interwoven with film study. The major steps include:
1. Registering and setting up a Digication site.
2. Practice blogging by recording reactions to films viewed in class. These films include professionally produced features and shorts as well as past Capstone films.
3. Begin posting Capstone components.
4. Commenting upon others’ postings.
5. Revise components until they meet standard on rubrics, located at http://campus.digication.com/mrskeldon/Rubrics.
6. Write journal entries on each step of the process.
7. Shoot and edit film
8. Prepare and deliver oral presentation which will be assessed by a panel of judges trained to use the rubric on a past presentation.
9. Revise presentation or film if necessary and present again.
10. Provide continual feedback to peers through classroom discussions and blogs.

Standards covered by this project are listed at http://campus.digication.com/mrskeldon/Standards.

It has been a pleasure to take this journey with all of you. Best wishes for all your future blogging and wiki work!

Scott Rollins said...

Scott Rollins
EDC 921 Final Project
South Kingstown HS

Title of Class: Sports Management and Marketing
Title of Unit: “Creation and Image Branding of a Sports Franchise”
Time Period: 6 Lessons, approx. 10 weeks in length
GSE’s Addressed: Reading:
• R3.2
Writing and Communication:
• W 1.3, 9.1-9.5
• OC 1.4, 2.1-2.4, 2.6
• W 6.1, 6.2

Lesson 1: Choosing a Franchise Location

Introduction: Students will learn the key components of selecting an appropriate location to place a professional sports franchise using demographic research and case studies.

Goals: At the culmination of this lesson, students will have identified a location within the United States to place their newly created professional football franchise

Activities:  Demographics Vocabulary Discussion (Auditory learner)
Map of United States with current NFL franchises (Visual learner)
 Houston Texans Case Study Handout (Visual and Auditory)

Writing Assignment: Use any Internet sources available to locate 3 cities you would like to place your franchise in. For each city, find the following information: (hint: US Government Census site is great!)
• Population
• % Male, % Female
• Median Age
• Median Household Income
• % in Labor Force
• Average Family Size
• % of Families Below Poverty Level
• % w/ HS Degree or Higher
• % w/ Bachelor Degree or Higher
After completing all research, please select the city you would like to place your franchise in. Remember to include your rationale for your choice…this is the most important part!!

Assessment: Place all demographic information on handout provided in your “H” drive. Assignment will be graded on the scale: √+ = 100, the √ = 80 and the √- = 60.

Lesson 2: Selecting a Nickname

Introduction: Students will learn the Marketing fundamentals involved in naming a professional sports franchise.

Goals: At the culmination of this lesson, students will have created an appropriate, unique and creative name for their newly created professional football franchise

Activities:  “Why this Name?” Handout
(Students guess how professional teams listed names were derived)
 Note Handouts on “4 Main Reasons for Team Nicknames
 Brainstorm which of the 4 categories each NFL team fits into
Students place NFL teams on white erase board under correct category

Writing Assignment: Using the Internet, research all the sports teams that play in your city.
Place each team’s nickname into 1 of the 4 categories for team naming. Using this research, create 1 potential team nickname for each of the 4 naming categories. Remember to use your notes and lessons from class when including your rationale for your selections!

Assessment: Place all nickname research on handout provided in your “H” drive, circle the name you like best. Assignment will be graded on the following scale: √+ = 100, the √ = 80 and the √- = 60.


Lesson 3: Deciding on Colors and Fonts

Introduction: Students will learn the Marketing fundamentals involved in the creation of professional sports teams colors styles and font style choices.

Goals: At the culmination of this lesson, students will choose both a color scheme and a font style for their franchise. Remembering that their selection should not only be creative but also appealing to the target market.

Activities:  Class Discussion on which team colors look cool and why
 NFL Team Font Grid (student fills in NFL team that uses each color)
 Note Handout “Psychology of Color”
 Class Discussion on major US companies that have clearly identifiable
font and color styles (Subway, Dunkin Donuts, Coca Cola, etc)
 Note Handout “Importance of Team Font”
 Set up of a “Google Alert” to let them know of any color/uniform changes happening in sports (ex: Arizona Diamondback switching from purple to red for the upcoming season)

Writing Assignment: Using the Internet, identify the colors used for all the local teams you listed in the previous project, looking for a pattern. (Ex: NY Knicks, Islanders and Mets all using Blue and Orange) Once research is completed, select a 2 color scheme for your franchise. Using WordArt or any Internet font creation site, write out your full team name (city/state and nickname) in the font and colors you have decided on. Remember to use your notes and lessons from class when including your rationale for your selections!

Assessment: Place all color and font research on handout provided in your “H” drive. Assignment will be graded on the following scale: √+ = 100, the √ = 80 and the √- = 60.

Lesson 4: Creation of a Logo and Mascot

Introduction: Students will learn the Marketing fundamentals involved in the creation of professional sports team’s logo.

Goals: At the culmination of this lesson, students will choose a logo for their franchise. Students must remember that their selection should not only be creative, appropriate for merchandise and also appealing to the target market.

Pre-Activities:  Students brainstorm which NFL logos they like the best
 Class discussion on what makes a logo appealing
 Article handout on Native American logo usage
 Guest speaker from Narragansett Indian Tribe discussing their views on American professional sports teams using Native American logos.
 Note Handout “Team Logo Creation”
 Internet article on Baltimore Ravens copyright infringement lawsuit
 Set up of a “Google Alert” to let them know of any logo changes happening in sports

Writing Assignment: Using the Internet for clipart, or any graphic design program (Photoshop, Microsoft paint, etc.) you are to create a team logo for your franchise. Please keep in mind the copyright laws and issues we discussed in class. The picture you use CAN’T be copyrighted or in use by ANY professional or collegiate sports team. The logo must be in your team colors, and must include your team name in the font you selected from the previous project. Remember to include your rationale behind logo choice.

Assessment: Place your logo on the Microsoft Word document I placed into your “H” drive. Please DO NOT change the size of the logo circle! Assignment will be graded on the following scale: √+ = 100, the √ = 80 and the √- = 60.

Lesson 5: Creating a Team Blog

Introduction: Students will learn how to create a blog for their mock franchise using blogger.com. In addition, students will learn both the personal and business uses of a blog.

Goals: Students will complete this lesson with the creation of a team blog. Each team’s blog will have a multitude of purposes. Each student will be able to use their team blog in the manner of their choice.

Pre-Activities:  Class discussion about what a blog is exactly, how many have used a blog before, how many have read a blog before, etc.
 Note Handout on “What Exactly is a Blog?”
 Students will have lab time to examine a few sports blogs including projo.com blog and espn.go.com blog as well as any others that they choose to view.
 Each student will individually complete a blog tutorial such as http://blogplates.net/tutorials.html, http://www.blogbasics.com/blog-setup-blogger.php, http://www.blogger.com/tour_start.g, or one found on their own.

Writing Assignment: Using blogger.com, your assignment is to create a team blog for your mock franchise. Please check handout I placed in your “h” drive for all blog project details. Some of the details include:

 Each student must make a minimum of 1 post a week
 Posts can be player oriented or team oriented.
 Player oriented posts examples are: stats, injuries, suspensions, trades, etc.
 Team oriented posts examples are: ticket promotions, sponsorship deals, team corporate events.
 Blog must be created within 1 week of fantasy football class draft.
 As the semester moves on, blog lessons will be taught to introduce new blog “tricks”
 In addition, all students will be responsible for commenting on a minimum of 2 classmate’s blogs per week. Keep in mind our rules for responsible blogging.

Assessment: Once your blog is complete, please place your blog URL on the space I provided on our class bulletin board. Once all class blogs are complete, you should begin posting and commenting. The general structure of your blog will be graded on the following scale: √+ = 100, the √ = 80 and the √- = 60.

Lesson 6: Building a Stadium

Introduction: Students will learn all the details involved in the creation of a professional sports stadium. Lesson will start with the planning stages and eventually conclude with sponsorships deals and agreements.

Goals: Students will complete this lesson and entire “Image Branding” unit with the planning and building/drawing of their own franchise sports stadium.

Pre-Activities:  Class discussion centered on students personal experiences with professional ballparks, stadiums and arenas…likes and dislikes
 Note Handout and PowerPoint Slide show on “Stadium Creation”
 Jigsaw an Article from “Sports Business Journal” that ranks the importance of certain amenities in stadiums
 Class field trip to Madison Square Garden and Yankee Stadium in NY to tour the facilities and ask any relevant questions (students may take pictures and create a slide presentation for extra credit)
 20 minutes of class time to view www.stadiumsofnfl.com and www.ballparks.com to brainstorm ideas
 20 minutes of class time to view “Google Earth” images of professional sports stadiums from aerial views. (Usually extended to 40-60 minutes because of class excitement with this technology!!)


Writing Assignment: Use any site you can find on the internet to research past and present professional football stadiums. Answer all questions on the handout I placed in your “H” drive. This handout is designed to help develop stadium ideas for your mid-term stadium project. When conducting research and completing handout, pay special attention to such items as: location of entrances, restrooms, concessions, ticket prices and locations, special gimmicks (ex: Buccaneers Cove at Raymond James Stadium in Tampa) etc.

Assessment: Complete Stadium Creation handout in its entirety and hand in for credit. Like always, assignment will be graded on the following scale: √+ = 100, the √ = 80 and the √- = 60.




Conclusion of Unit: “Creation and Image Branding of a Sports Franchise” unit is concluded with a large mid-term stadium building project. This project is graded on a fairly large rubric and is counted as 10% of their final course grade. Each class member must construct a stadium for their franchise to play in. All stadiums must have 3 views: From Above, From the Front and Google Earth (students must use Google Earth to find an actual plot of land in their city that is suitable for stadium construction). Stadiums can either be built (Lego’s, Popsicle sticks, Styrofoam, Wood blocks, etc) drawn by hand, or drawn using a graphic program like Photoshop, Paint or Google Sketch Pad, etc. Students are required to share their stadiums with the class in an informal presentation so that details can be explained and questions can be asked.

Jennifer said...

Introduction:

This unit will serve as my students’ first foray into the world of wikis as well as utopias. Ultimately, the wiki will serve to document the creation of our utopias, but first, in order for students to learn and make decisions about their roles as digital citizens in the “meta-utopia” of the wiki, I realized they needed more of an introductory unit. Thus, one of the goals of this unit is to make students aware of the pitfalls as well as the power of the wiki as meta-utopia as they build a virtual world collaboratively in a subsequent unit.

The unit will begin with a study of Gaviotas, a small successful utopia which has existed since 1971 in Colombia, along with an examination of Jonestown, site of the (in)famous Jonestown Massacre in 1978 in Guyana. I chose to begin with these communities for their potential high interest (death by koolaid, gruesome!) as well as possible cultural relevance, as many of my students are Latino. Also, my students tend to prefer nonfiction as opposed to beginning with something like Ecotopia. Some of the more social studies oriented work I would do around this topic is not included here if it does not involve use of the wiki. I have broken down any given society into approximately 20 sub-topics including things like economy, government, technology, media, healthcare, family, etc. Students will analyze Gaviotas and Jonestown and the surrounding region (basically the continent of South America north of the Amazon River) according to these sub-topics first just using the readings I provide, then adding some research for sub-topics that remain fuzzy. We will use our wiki initially as a place to report the facts for these sub-topics, and students will “fact-check” each other. Hopefully this will be a way to get students reading each other’s writing critically, yet in a low-risk environment where the corrections, if any, won’t generate too much controversy.

We will next use our wiki as an annotated bibliography for any additional research that proves necessary. I will begin by posting some sites and explaining how/why they are useful in my annotation, then I will post sites without annotation and required students to annotate, then I will allow students to add sites of their own with annotation. Teaching students to create an annotated bibliography (which they are all required to produce by the end of the year) has been difficult in the past, so hopefully this will serve as a step-by-step model for them.

Once we have a clear picture of all aspects of the region encompassing Gaviotas and Jonestown, we will use the wiki to analyze the success and failures of the two communities and prepare for a panel discussion on this topic. Finally, students will write a formal persuasive essay on the successes or failures of Gaviotas or Jonestown. In the future, students will create a new utopia based in the region that builds on the successes and addresses the failures of Jonestown and Gaviotas, although this process actually becomes part of a subsequent unit. Again, each group will be responsible for a different sub-topic, so much collaboration is in order for the new society to function. Ultimately, the wiki becomes a virtual world created by my students in which one participates by visiting the wiki.

Please note that all classes are 90 minute blocks that meet every other day.
Day 1

Goals: Students will navigate to and in the wiki to locate the proper sub page and write a summary of their findings from their article on that particular sub-topic that uses no more than one direct quote. They will provide a proper citation for their findings (author, p. #) so that a fellow students can check their facts in the future.

Pre-activities: Students will have read/marked up their articles on Jonestown or Gaviotas in a previous class and/or as homework in addition to various social studies assignments related to these communities. They will have taken notes from their reading on any three sub-topics; one that I assign and two of their choice. Students who do not show evidence of reading, marking, and note-taking will not be allowed to begin working on the wiki until they do so. The students will have already received an overview of wikis using Wikipedia as an example with which they are all familiar. In addition, students will have previewed another school’s utopia wiki at http://discoveryutopias.wikispaces.com/ to get an idea what our wiki could be like.

In class:

1. Entrance ticket: what are the advantages and disadvantages of wikis? Students write silently for the first 5-10 minutes of class while I check homework.

2. Students share ideas from their entrance tickets. If necessary, I emphasize how it will help them collaborate accountably, will help them find more resources when they get stuck, will provide good examples of student work whenever they need ideas, and will allow them to work together even with people who aren’t necessarily in the same room.

3. I will walk students through how to use the class wiki.

4. Writing assignment: Using your notes and marked up text, write a summary of everything you have learned about your assigned sub topic from the article. You may use one direct quote. Make sure you cite where you got your information (author, p. #). Your summary will not be fact-checked without citation(s), and getting fact-checked is required!

5. Students who can compose at the keyboard and who have completed the homework will have first dibs on the computers. As they finish, they can print what they have written so that others who finish in the first round can have something to begin fact-checking while other students rotate onto the computers. Other students can begin handwriting their summaries, and of course, some students will need more reading time and assistance.

6. Students will have most of the rest of the 90 minute block to work.

7. Homework: Finish handwriting summary if necessary. Print out a Wikipedia entry on any topic you feel you have quite a bit of knowledge about.

Extension and Adaptation: Those students who are finished early may find their Wikipedia articles if computers are available. Some students may also wish to begin additional research on the two communities. Two different reading levels will be available for each of the articles, and I could further reduce the amount of reading by having certain students focus on certain parts of the articles. I will also have available full-length books on both communities for students who want to use a related book to fulfill their outside reading requirement. There are endless interdisciplinary extensions that English and science classes will be using as they pursue the same topic. Small groups of students may have the option of discussing the article with each other to make sure they have full comprehension but again, much of this work may be completed in English and/or science classes.

Assessment: The final drafts of the summaries will ultimately be evaluated by the teacher using the rubric under Day 2.

Day 2

Goals: Students will practice fact-checking/evaluating using some Wikipedia entries as models. Those who are ready will fact-check two entries on the sub-topics they choose to take notes on when they read their articles. By the end of class, all students need to enter their summary on the wiki.

Pre-activities: See Day 1 homework assignment.

In class:

1. Entrance ticket: Make a list of criteria you could use to judge whether or not a summary is “factual,” or even just a list of criteria for what makes a good summary.

2. As a class, we will generate a list of criteria for good summaries, and what constitutes “factual.” I will add to it as necessary, using the rubric below as a general guide.

3. As a class, we will evaluate the Wikipedia entry on Jonestown using our criteria. Students will read silently then share their critiques. I will share the “discussion” comments and the criteria used to evaluate the article by Wikipedia. This will be a chance for all students to learn about Jonestown, even if their initial article was about Gaviotas, and visa versa (see below).

4. As a class, we will evaluate the Wikipedia entry on Gaviotas, which Wikipedia has rated lower than the article on Jonestown. Students will read silently then share their critiques, and I will show them the critiques from Wikipedia contributors.

5. Individually, students will evaluate the Wikipedia entry they brought in. They may get a on a computer to check Wikipedia’s discussion/rating of their articles once they have made their own evaluation. If they didn’t bring in their own entry, I will provide them with a random one, about which they may not be expert. At this point, students who have not entered their summaries must do so, and save their evaluation of their Wikipedia article for homework.

6. Writing assignment/homework: In paragraph form, write an evaluation of your Wikipedia article that addresses each point in our list of criteria. Make sure you can defend WHY you are evaluating the entry as you are, citing specific examples from the article.

Extension and Adaptation: Those students who are finished early may begin reading summaries on the class wiki and choosing two which they will fact-check next class. Some students will only focus on one Wikipedia article, or even just one section of one article.

Assessment:

A “4” SUMMARY WILL:

*Include correct information about the main topics brought up by the author

*Leave out any bias, detail, or description

*Be in your own words (put away your article; only use your notes)

*Use only ONE direct quote that will be cited (Geller, p. 43)

*Use key terms related to the topic

*Avoid repetition

*Use synthesis instead of rephrasing (put away your article!)

*Use clear writing, direct language, and make sense

Day 3

Goals: All students will have the opportunity to fact-check/evaluate at least one summary other than their own.

In class:

1. Students who hand in their individual evaluations of their Wikipedia articles may begin fact checking other summaries. The writing assignment is the same as Day 2, only now students are evaluating each other’s summaries. They will do this directly below the summary on the appropriate sub-topic page.

2. Other students may have to finish their Wikipedia articles first, then they can rotate on computers.

3. This will be a work period.

4. Homework: Finish evaluations of fellow students’ summaries. These must be completed by next class so you can have a chance to revise using the evaluations.

Extension and Adaptation: Students may evaluate/fact-check more than one summary. Summaries may vary in length since some students may be assigned to read only parts of their article, however all summaries should still meet the basic criteria. For students who are really struggling, I will show them how to evaluate using their own summary in a conference. I will have them read examples of good summaries from the wiki, and have them try to explain why it is a good summary. Then the focus will be more on improving their own summaries rather than evaluating someone else’s summary.

Assessment: Evaluations will be checked for effectiveness; ie, how easy would it be for a student to use the evaluation to improve his/her summary?

Day 4

Goals: By the end of this class, students should have a clear picture of what they do know about Jonestown and Gaviotas. Students will also begin to utilize the evaluation/fact check comments to improve their summaries.

Pre-activities: Depending on how comfortable students feel with the material, and how much more in depth we feel we need to go, there may be a day of social studies without technology between the previous lesson and this one, though some of those issues will also be addressed in English and science classes, since we team teach.

In class:

1. Students receive their fellow students’ evaluations of their summaries and half begin work on revisions. Conferences with individual students as necessary if there appear to be big gaps in comprehension or missing material.

2. Students who are not on computers will be grouped based on what article they read and what sub-topics they covered. They will prepare to present their information as a group.

3. Swap groups half way through the period. Be ready to present with your group first thing next class.

4. Writing assignment/homework: Revision of summary entered below the evaluation on the appropriate sub-page.

Extension and Adaptation: Hopefully the group work will help get everyone up to speed on their community. Having the chance to talk rather than write about the material will help some students demonstrate what they know, while good writers will be challenged to communicate what they know orally.

Assessment: See Day 2 rubric

Day 5

Goals: By the end of class, students will have a clear picture about what information they still need to locate about Gaviotas or Jonestown, and will have begun researching that information.

Pre-activities: By the time they are on my team, students are supposed to have been introduced to the basics of good internet research skills including use of key words in google how to evaluate a site for trustworthiness.

In class:

1. Quick (5 minutes each) presentations by groups of their information. The audience needs to come up with questions about the material which the groups will note as additional information they need to research.

2. Students are now in groups based on sub-topics, one sub-topic per group, so everyone can be on a computer. I will put several links on the wiki that students should start with for their research. As they decide a source is appropriate, they are to print it out and assign it to a group member to read. That person needs to write a few sentences explaining why the source is trustworthy and what questions it will help answer. This will become the annotation and will be entered with the link on the wiki.

3. Writing assignment/homework: Final revision of the summary due next class, begin writing annotations.

Extension and Adaptation: Students are welcome to locate more than the required number of sources, as long as each group member reads and annotates at least one source. I will assist students in assigning each other material of an appropriate level or length.

Assessment: Annotations will be checked based on their completeness and their usefulness to others. I would like to figure out a way to track if students are using the teacher/student generated bibliography on the wiki to locate sources. That would encourage students to write better annotations. I don’t give a lot of small, individual grades because we don’t do averages. I will have students submit a final version of the bibliography when they write their final persuasive essay at the end of the unit.

Days 6 and 7

Goals: All groups will have located at least three sites that will help fill in the rest of the information for the sub-topics and will have made the appropriate annotations and entries to the wiki.

Pre-activities: By the time they are on my team, students are supposed to have had practice writing bibliographies.

In class:

1. These two days are work days. In addition to using my links, students need to find at least two quality source of their own and make annotated bibliography entries for them on the wiki. At the beginning of class I will show them how to put links into the wiki.

2. Writing assignment/homework: Finish all annotations.

Extension and Adaptation: See Day 5.

Assessment: A final version of the annotated bibliography will be included as part of the final persuasive essay for this unit.

Days 8 and 9

Goals: Students will create a clear picture on the wiki of all aspects of the region in which Gaviotas and Jonestown are located by attempting to write collaboratively on the wiki.

Pre-activities: Again, there may be the need for social studies without technology for a couple days between days 7 and 8 for students to read and take notes on their research material, though again, that could be happening simultaneously in English and science.

In class:

1. Writing assignment: Each group member will begin to enter his/her summary of new information individually in the appropriate place on the wiki. As they do, they will need to make sure it fits in/doesn’t repeat/doesn’t contradict what other group members have already written, so in order to write they will also have to read. In addition, whenever students cite their information, they will link it to the annotated bibliography page as well as to the original source.

2. Wrap up--Reflection writing assignment: (to be handed in when class ends): What frustrated you about trying to write collaboratively today? What did you find helpful? Are there any rules we need to establish about writing collaboratively? What do you know now about yourself as a learner or about your topic that you didn’t know at the beginning of class? If you had to do it all over again, what would you do differently?

3. Homework: finish summary of new information.

Extension and Adaptation: I may need to print out some of the wiki writing for students who don’t read as well from the screen. I may have to have them do an additional exercise to make sure they read what is on the wiki before they add their own material, or I might have weaker students enter their material first, and have stronger students do more editing.

Assessment: Summaries will be scored using the same rubric as was used for the initial summaries, with the additional criteria that the citations must be linked both to the annotated bibliography page as well as to the original source. Reflection will be checked for honesty and thoughtfulness, and feedback will be incorporated into subsequent classes.

Days 10 and 11

Goals: Students will begin to analyze successes and failures in Gaviotas and Jonestown and the reasons for them through collaborative writing and discussion.

Pre-activities: Students already know the drill for panel discussions. The difference here is preparing for the discussion using the wiki. See deliverable #2 for the general format of panel discussions.

In class:

1. Entrance ticket: Make a T-chart list of the failures and successes of Gaviotas or Jonestown.

2. As a class, share out lists. How do we define “success” or “failure?” Are we going to agree on what is success and what is failure? What are some of the reasons for the successes in one place versus the failures of the other place? The goal is to get students to see, in this initial discussion, that there is more to discuss.

3. Group students for panel discussions so that the groups have some students who read about Jonestown and some who read about Gaviotas, and so a variety of experts in sub-topics are represented.

4. Writing assignment: Students will write individual answers to the questions below and enter them in the wiki. Once all panel members have entered their answers, members will be required to link their answers to another members answers with which they agree, disagree, or can connect with related information/ideas. Panel members can meet to prepare their discussion after the writing assignment is completed.

A. What are your definitions of success and failure? According to your definitions, what were some of the successes and failures of Gaviotas or Jonestown?

B. Are there any “successes” that might be interpreted as “failures” by someone else? How?
C. Identify several reasons for some of the success and failures of Gaviotas or Jonestown. Use information from specific sub-topics in your explanations, and create links to those sub-topics which you mention in your reasoning.

D. Make a final evaluation about whether Gaviotas or Jonestown was an overall success or failure.

Extension and Adaptation: I would ask lower-level students to focus on the first question in the writing assignment. They would not be exempt from answering why during the panel discussion, but for many of these students, writing why is more difficult than verbalizing it, especially when in face-to-face dialog. I might also point lower-level students to a specific wiki entry to which I think they might be able to link more easily, rather than having them get lost in too much reading.

Assessment: Wiki entries will be scored using the rubric below.

6: Makes connections in entry that discover larger questions and themes; meets all other requirements of a 5

5: Raises important big picture questions in entry that could lead the group to new discoveries about their topics; meets all other requirements of a 4

4: Entry cites specific evidence from summaries; raises questions that could allow all group members to participate; entry raises many possible successes and failures; entry explains reasons for these successes and failures with evidence that a non-expert can understand; entry links to sources for specific information; entry links to other entries and discusses possible connections

3: Entry may be less directed at specific evidence from summaries; may not raise questions; entry raises some possible successes and failures; entry explains successes and failures with less specific evidence; entry makes some attempt to link to sources; attempts to link entry to other entries but may not fully discuss connections

2: Entry is disconnected and unfocused; does not raise questions; has trouble raising possible success and failures; entry does not explain reasons for those failures; entry does not link to sources; entry does not link to other entries
1: Makes minimal attempt to post and/or comment

0: No entry

Day 12

Goals: As a result of the panel discussions, arrive at some conclusions about the relative successes and failures of utopias.

Pre-activities: One of the requirements for getting on my team is that you are able to write a persuasive essay independently.

In class:

1. Students will “perform” their panels in front of the class and will be assessed using the rubric below.

2. Writing assignment/homework: In a persuasive essay, argue whether or not Gaviotas or Jonestown was an overall success or failure. Cite information/reasoning from at least two other panels in addition to your own. Include your annotated bibliography from the wiki.

Extension and Adaptation: If necessary, I will provide a persuasive essay template to weaker students after they have shown me a page of their own writing. More advanced students would be asked to cite additional examples of outside reading they have completed.

Assessment:

Panels will be assessed using the rubric below (each student gets his/her own score).

6: Makes connections in entry that discover larger questions and themes; meets all other requirements of a 5

5: Raises important big picture questions that could lead the group to new discoveries about their topics; meets all other requirements of a 4

4: Cites specific evidence from summaries; raises questions that could allow all group members to participate; raises many possible successes and failures; explains reasons for these successes and failures with evidence that a non-expert can understand; includes all group members; listens and connects ideas to each other; speaks loudly and clearly; lasts the full ten minutes

3: May use less specific evidence from summaries; may not raise questions; raises some possible successes and failures; explains successes and failures with less specific evidence; may dominate the discussion or hold back; panel does not always hold together, ideas are not linked; speaks but does not raise questions; must be reminded to speak up; less slightly less than ten minutes

2: Comments are disconnected and unfocused; does not raise questions; has trouble raising possible success and failures; does not explain reasons for those failures; panel is largely done by one or two group members, difficult to hear or understand; is far short of 10 minutes

1: Makes minimal attempt to speak; may not take the assignment seriously

0: Does not speak

Persuasive essays will be assessed using the rubric below:

6:___Makes connections to other units or classes
___ Meets all the requirements of a 5

5:___ Draws independent conclusions or observations
___ Meets all the requirements of a 4

4:___ Thesis is clearly stated and focused
___ Uses specific, accurate evidence to support a thesis about whether or not Gaviotas/Jonestown was an overall success or failure
___ Includes specific details from information about the sub topics
___ Counter argument is a significant part of the essay that uses specific evidence from the sub topics
___ Argumentation (the why) is clear and logical and is not based on hypotheticals
___ Cites evidence from at least two other panel discussions
___ Uses proper inline citations
___ Includes complete and accurate annotated bibliography
___ Minor mistakes in grammar, spelling, and mechanics do not detract from the paper

3:___ Thesis is less clearly stated; may be less focussed
___ Evidence is less accurate or specific and may not directly support the thesis
___ Details are less specific or may be missing, or may not use information about the sub topics
___ Counter argument is included but may not be a significant part of the essay and uses less specific evidence than the rest of the essay
___ Argumentation may be less clear and logical, and may be based on hypotheticals
___ Cites evidence from one other panel discussion
___ Uses some inline citations, may not be done correctly
___ Includes annotated bibliography, annotations may not be as complete, may be less accurate
___Mistakes in grammar, spelling, and mechanics begin to detract from the paper

2:___ Thesis may be unclear and unfocussed
___ Evidence is not specific and may be inaccurate, and does not clearly support the thesis
___ Does not use enough details from the sub topics
___ A counter argument may be missing, or is only mentioned in passing
___ Argumentation is weak and is based on hypotheticals
___ Does not use evidence from other panels
___ Does not use inline citations
___ May be missing a bibliography
___Many mistakes in grammar, spelling, and mechanics detract from the paper

1: ___Draft is too incomplete to assess accurately

0: ___ No draft is handed in

Jennifer said...

Unfortunately, the wiki was not working properly so I only put my project here.

Tom Carney said...

Tom Carney
7th Grade ELA
ride8398@ride.ri.net
EDC921 Final Project
Mr. Dave Fontaine


Unit Introduction

In this unit the students will be learning how to use blogs and wikis in the context of a literature circles unit. The students will pick one of the following books: Gathering Blue by Lois Lowry, Of Mice and Men by John Steinbeck, Lord of the Flies by William Golding, or

Unit Goals

The students will improve upon their understanding of the novel by answering online prompts during the course of the reading, posting questions/comments/ideas/reflections about the reading to the blog and/or the wiki, and extending classroom discussions into online discussions through the use of the blog and the wiki. Students will gain an understanding of the educational value of these online tools and how to use them.

GLEs covered:
R-7-4: Students demonstrate initial understanding of elements of literary texts.
R-7-5: Students analyze and interpret elements of literary texts, citing evidence where appropriate.
R-7-6: Students analyze and interpret author’s craft, citing evidence where appropriate.
W-7-1: Students demonstrate command of the structures of sentences, paragraphs, and text.
W-7-2: In response to literary or informational text, students show understanding of plot/ideas/concepts.
W-7-3: In response to literary or informational text, students make and support analytical judgments about text.


Lesson 1 (1-2 days)

Introduction: The students will each pick a novel from the above list to read for the duration of the unit. The students will form into literature circle groups based on the novel that they are reading. The school’s “Filtering and Monitoring Policy” will be reviewed for the students and they will have the opportunity to ask questions. They will then learn about blogs and more specifically, the class blog.

Goals: The students will gain an understanding about what blogs are and how to use them. They will answer questions, read the comments of other students, and post comments on their own at least twice per week throughout the unit.

Pre-Activities: The class will view a brief presentation on blogs. The students will learn how to access the class blog as well as how to post comments to it. The blog will contain four links, each link connecting to a page for a specific book. The students will make their first post during this session, answering the prompt: Based on the title and the cover of the novel, what do you predict that the story will be about? They will then research background information about the author of the novel as a pre-reading strategy.

Writing Assignments:

1. Answer the prompt for the first post.
2. Twice each week (on assigned days), the students must visit the class blog, answer the posted questions, make additional comments or ask questions, and make an effort to participate in the online discussion with their peers.
3. Journal entry- “How are blogs going to change education and the sharing of information in the near future?

Extension/Adaptation: Students that are struggling readers will have access to supports such as audio recordings and assistance from the reading specialist and/or the teacher/aide. Students that do not have access to the internet at home will be given the opportunity to submit their posts during the school day and will be given extensions as appropriate.

Assessment: Students will be graded for each of the three writing assignments with the standard homework grade of a check plus, check, check minus, or zero.

Lesson 2 (1-2 Days)

Introduction: The students will learn basic information about wikis and how to use them. A class wiki will be established specifically for insights and discussions on themes within each novel and will be kept for future classes to elaborate on, alter, and benefit from an ongoing compilation of information. Each student will be required to make at least two posts throughout the unit.

Goals: The class will learn about wikis and how they are used.

Pre-Activities: The students will view a brief presentation on wikis. Then we will access several wikis online and look at the aspects that differentiate wikis from blogs. The class will then go to the wiki page for their novel and ask questions as needed.

Writing Assignments:
1. Journal entry- “What are the major differences between a blog and a wiki? What are the benefits/drawbacks of each?”
2. Throughout the unit, each student must make at least two posts to the wiki for their novel, addressing a particular theme or other deeper forms of analysis. This is not included in the final post to the wiki, which is a formal writing assignment.

Assessment: Students will be graded for each of the writing assignments with the standard homework grade of a check plus, check, check minus, or zero.


Lesson 3 (12-15 Days)

Introduction- While reading the novel, the students will alternate between classroom discussions and posts to the blog each week (this will be important with our new schedule, in which we only meet in class every other day). The posts to the wiki can be made at any time.

Goals- The students will learn how to post comments to a blog and to interact with each other by asking/answering questions in an online forum.

Pre-Activities: The students will log on to the established classroom blog and will be shown how to post comments to it. Throughout the remainder of the unit they will post questions/comments at least twice per week making connections between their research and the novel.

Writing Assignments:
1. Two posts per week to the class blog, answering the prompt on the page and making additional comments.

Extension and Adaptation: The prompts for each of the novels will vary and will appear each night that a post is assigned. Some examples of prompts that will be used are as follows:

• What facts about the author’s reason(s) for writing the novel were you able to discover? Does the novel connect to a particular time period or actual people/events?
• How does the setting of the novel “set the stage” for the events that follow?
• What motives influence (a particular character’s) actions in this chapter?
• What predictions can you make about future events in the novel based on this chapter?
• How does (a particular character) resemble the historical person the author is writing about? (When appropriate)
• How do the events of this chapter resemble historical events? (When appropriate)
• Based on the reading to date, what would you say a major theme of the novel is?

Assessment: Students will be graded for each of the two weekly posts with the standard homework grade of a check plus, check, check minus, or zero. The final post be a book review of the novel, and will receive a formal writing grade of a 5, 4, 3, 2, 1, 0 based on the established writing rubric.

Lesson 4 (5-7 Days)

Introduction: The students will begin pick a topic and begin writing their third critical essay for the year.

Goals: To produce a concise, well-written critical essay, including a cover page, an outline, citations, a rough draft, and a final draft.

Pre-Activities: The students will receive a graphic organizer for brainstorming their chosen topic. They will then use the brainstorm to begin gathering information to support a thesis. They will receive a graphic organizer for outlining and an example will be completed on the overhead. We will review the format for a five-paragraph critical essay. Upon completion of the rough draft, the students will peer-edit, have a teacher conference, and revise to produce a final draft.

Writing Assignments:
1. Finish the graphic organizers.
2. Produce the cover page, outline, rough draft, and final draft for the critical essay.

Assessment: Students will be graded for each of the individual parts of the writing assignment with the standard homework grade of a check plus, check, check minus, or zero. The final copy of the critical essay will receive a formal writing grade of a 5, 4, 3, 2, 1, 0 based on the established writing rubric.

Dave Fontaine said...

THIS ENDS THE FINAL PROJECTS FOR EDC921 SUMMER '07 PARTICIPANTS. GOOD LUCK AND PLEASE ALSO POST THEM TO THE WIKI.

Reading blog said...

Introduction:
This unit titled Digging Deeper For Comprehension, will be used with the English/Reading 9 classes. These ninth grade students are in a double period English/Reading class. These students are typically reading three or more years below grade level. The reading specialist (me) is teacher in the classroom with the English teacher and some days the special educator. We try to keep the students motivated by doing a variety of activities while maintaining their attention.


TITLE OF UNIT:
Digging Deeper For Comprehension
Using the play The Christmas Carol

TIMELINE:
Eleven activities

STANDARDS:
R-10-4.2 Paraphrasing or summarizing key ideas/plot, with major events sequenced
R-8-4 Identifying or describing character, setting, conflict, resolution or plot
R-8-4.5 Identifying literary devices, imagery, metaphors,
R-1.8.3 Uses comprehension strategies (flexibly and as needed) before, during and after reading literary and information text (including: prior knowledge, making connections, predicting, making inferences, determining importance, asking questions, visualizing)
W-2.2 Connecting what has been read to prior knowledge, other texts, or the broader world of ideas be referring to and explaining relevant ideas or themes
personification, hyperbole
R-10-4.3 Generating questions before, during, and after reading to enhance understand and recall
R-10- 5.2 Examining characterization, motivation, or interactions
R- 10-16 Generates a personal response to what is read through a variety of means
R-10-13 Uses Comprehension strategies before, during, and after reading literary text

CONNECTION TO CURRICULUM:
1.1.1 will meet the twenty-five book standard (including plays)
1.1.2 demonstrate participation in a literate community by participating in in-depth discussions about text
1.2.3 drawing the texts together to compare and contrast themes, character, and ideas
1.4.1 using strategies to unlock meaning

Reading an adapted version of a high interest play.

ISSUE AND/OR ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS: (Goals)

The students will be using a variety of reading strategies to enhance their comprehension of a text. Another goal of this lesson is to improve upon students fluency through readers’ theater.


SEQUENCE OF TASKS:
Pre-reading activities:
* The students will already be used to using the smartboard and the class blog.
*The students will be given an anticipation guide to begin the unit. The anticipation guide will be done individually then discussed as a group. The anticipation guide questions will be posted to the class blog before the session. The students will have the opportunity to preview the questions before class. That way the students that need longer to process the information can preview the questions prior to actually doing the assignment. The students can read, write and respond to one another.
*The students will have a mini lesson on how to read a play.
*The students will research Charles Dickens on the computer. The students will be assigned to find five important details about Charles Dickens to report to the class. The students will share out the details. The teacher will then give any additional background information about Charles Dickens. The information from the students and the teacher will be posted on the class blog. The students will be able to post their information and any additional information they find throughout the unit.
During reading activities:
*The students will be given parts in A Christmas Carol. The students will practice their lines, to increase their fluency and phrasing.
*The students will be given several journal entries to complete throughout the play. There will be a journal entry rubric used for all the entries.
*These journal entries will help the class to dig deeper into the comprehension of the play.
Post reading activities:
*The students will continue to complete journal entries comparing and contrasting the play.
*The students will go on a field trip to Stadium Theater in Woonsocket to see A Christmas Carol.
*After returning from the play the students will compare the play we read in class to the play we saw.





INSTRUCTION (Best practices (including but not limited to cooperative learning, differentiated instruction, flexible grouping, peer editing, modeling, hands-on, student centered, etc.):
Best practices:
Using a classblog(www.lincolnhighschoolreading.blogspot.com) from www.blogger.com
Using www.audacity.sourceforge.net for podcasting
Using www.Feedburner.com to use for podcasting with www.blogger.com
Using http://www.storyteller.net/stories/audio for reading with expression
Use the internet for researching Charles Dickens
Modeling mini lessons
Cooperative learning groups
Differentiated instruction (graphic organizers partially filled in for those who need it)(longer or shorter journal entries based on their need)
Sentence starters for those who need them for their journal entries
Working with partners to discuss their work
Posting their work on the class blog (developing a purpose)( Motivation for the students to do well)
Modeling how to read with expression (tape the students and add to podcast)
Graphic organizers on chart paper
Charts hanging in the classroom for students to refer to
Rubrics for all assignments
Pre reading, during reading and post reading strategies
Group project rubric

Activity One:
The class will begin this unit by completing an anticipation guide for A Christmas Carol. The guide will be posted on the class blog prior to the lesson. After the students complete the guide, the class will take part in a conversation about it. The students will predict what play we will be reading. The teacher will then ask who wrote A Christmas Carol. The students will then write in their journal about their knowledge of Charles Dickens. If the students feel they can not write much about Charles Dickens, they can write anything that comes to mind when they hear, A Christmas Carol or Charles Dickens. After discussion of their knowledge, the teacher will have the students research on the computer Charles Dickens. Each student will report out five useful pieces of information that they learned. The students will post the information on the class blog. The teacher will then give the class any additional background knowledge about Charles Dickens. The class will then discuss the characters in the play. We will use the internet to print out pictures of each of the characters. Differentiated instruction will be used for those students who need an extention activity. The students who need an extention activity will research and write a description to go along with the pictures of the characters. Characters will be assigned for the play.




Activity Two:
The class will begin with a mini lesson on how to read a play. The teacher will use the smartboard and the website http://www.storyteller.net/stories/audio to model reading with expression. The teacher will then model using the same story without expression. The class will discuss why it is important to read with expression.
The students will begin with Act 1, Scene 1; London, Scrooge's office. After scene 1, the class will discuss the scene. The students will discuss how Cratchit and Scrooge must feel. The students will read Scene 2. The class will discuss Scene 1 and 2. The teacher will discuss the journal rubric. The students will complete a journal entry. What do you think Marley’s chain represents? Why does he wear it? After completing their entry the students will discuss their entry with a partner. Sentence starters will be used for differentiated instruction upon need. After each scene, the class will fill in the important events in the graphic organizer. For differentiated instruction the teacher will pass out a partially filled organizer for the students who need one. We will review how graphic organizers help to improve comprehension. The students will finish their organizer for homework. Additional homework will be for students to report about their discussion of their journal entry about Marley on the class blog. Students should read and respond to other students comments.

Activity Three:
The class will begin by previewing the class blog on the smartboard. The class and students will respond to the comments posted. The class will then go over the graphic organizers from the previous day.
The class will continue with the students forming small cooperative groups to compare Scrooge with his late partner Marley. Students who need it will have one similarity and difference filled in on their organizer. The cooperative groups will make a list explaining how the two characters are alike and different. The class will then make a whole class list of the similarities on chart paper.
The class will start reading Act 2. After each scene, the class will fill in the important events on the graphic organizer. Class will end with a journal entry. The students will write a description of Scrooge. They will also include their opinion of Scrooge thus far. Comments will be posted on the class blog.

Activity Four:
The class will recap what has happened to this point. The class will continue reading Act 2. The students will write a journal entry comparing and contrasting Scrooge and Fezziwig. How are they alike and how are they different? The teacher will introduce a Venn diagram as a graphic organizer to help improve their comprehension of the play. The smartboard will be used to show the Venn diagram. The teacher will fill out the organizer on the smartboard as the students are filling it out.



Activity Five:
The class will begin with a mini lesson on visualizing. The class will discuss how this helps improve comprehension. The students will be told that their job is to visualize in their head what the text is describing. The class will start reading Act 3. After Act 3, the students will be divided into cooperative groups and choose four events in each Act to draw. The students need to use the text to imagine what the events look like.

Activity Six:
Class will begin with each group continuing to work on their visualizing project. The class will then explain and show their project to the class. When the projects are complete, the teacher will use the school’s digital camera to take pictures of the projects. The teacher will use the www.Flickr.com to display the pictures. This would be a great way to celebrate their work. Family members and other classroom teachers would be able to view what the class is working on.


Activity Seven:
Class will begin with Act IV. The class will stop in different points to discuss each Scene and complete their graphic organizer. The class will complete a journal entry. The entry would include if they could change Act 1V, what they would change about it. These entries could also be included on the class blog.



Activity Eight:
The class will read Act V. The class will fill in their graphic organizer and discuss the Act. The class will also write a new description of Scrooge in their journal. They will be asked to compare this entry to the entry they wrote at the beginning of the unit. The students will make a list of character traits. The teacher will then pass out a list of character traits for the students to use for this assignment. The class will work in a small group and discuss the similarities and differences in their entries. The students will then recreate Act 1, knowing what they know about Scrooge now. The students will rewrite Act 1 in a small group. They will use Scrooge’s character traits in Act 5 and apply them to Act 1. The groups will be assessed using a group rubric for this project.

Activity Nine:
The class will choose one of the entries below:

1. Scrooge's mother had died giving birth to him; his father blamed him for her death. As a result he led a lonely and bitter life. Compare and contrast his attitude with that of Tiny Tim, who was also having a difficult life.


2. Ebenezer Scrooge said that he feared the Spirit of Christmas Yet to Come more than all the others? Why do you think that was? How would you react if you got the chance to see your future?

3. Pretend you are Ebenezer Scrooge. You have never done one kind thing or said one kind word to your only living relative. Now you are ashamed of yourself. The next time you saw your nephew, what would you say to him? How would you explain your past behavior?

After the entries are complete the students will form cooperative groups with the other students who completed the same entry. The students will discuss their entry with the other members of their group. Finished entries could be published to the class blog. The students would get a chance to showcase their accomplishments.

Activity Ten:
A Christmas Carol Stadium Theater Woonsocket, Rhode Island

Activity Eleven:
The class will discuss the play we saw at Stadium Theater. The class will complete be assessed on A Christmas Carol by completing a Venn Diagram comparing and contrasting the similarities and differences between the play we read and the play we saw. The students could also use pictures to help describe the similarities and differences. The teacher will review the Compare and Contrast writing rubric before the students begin writing.
The students will write their own ending of A Christmas Carol.
These responses could be shared on the class blog.
For extra credit the students could write a review of the play we saw at the Stadium Theater and post it to the class blog.
Students could also write a review of the play we read in class.


PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT:
*The students will be comparing and contrasting the play we read and the play we saw at Stadium Theater. The students can use a graphic organzer, pictures, or journal entry. The students will be assessed using the Compare and Contrast writing rubric.
*The students will write their own ending of A Christmas Carol.
* The students will also be assessed on their journal entries throughout the unit. The students will be assessed using the journal entry rubric.

Reading blog said...

Please let me know if you need the actual rubrics to go along with the assignment.

Anonymous said...

Final Project-EDC921
Terri Spisso


I'm posting my unit overview below. There are 5+lessons and handouts that I will post to the wiki.

Podcasting Ponaganset

School: Ponaganset High School, N. Scituate, RI
Grade Level: Mixed grades 10-12, Ecology
Library Media Specialist: Terri Spisso
Classroom Teacher: Dave Moscarelli
Thematic Unit: Using technology in the ecology classroom
Curriculum Connections: local ecological and historical field study, script writing, oral presentation, library research skills, technology, audio-production.
Rationale: Learners will understand local ecology surrounding Ponaganset High school to create podguides to the nature trails behind the school building. Learners will contribute to classroom blog surrounding Ecology class to promote community use of the podguides.
Introductory Activity: Students will listen to podguides available on the Internet and will brainstorm how to effectively create podguides about our School’s nature trails.
Inquiry: Essential Questions:
1. What are podguides?
2. How can podguides promote use of the school’s nature/fitness trails?
3. What local ecology/history can be researched to create podcasts?
4. What tools/technologies are necessary to create podcasts?
Learner Objectives:
1. Learner will demonstrate understanding of podguides by listening to several guides and reporting back to the class.
2. Learner will demonstrate their understanding of local ecology by completing library and field research of specific aspects of the school’s nature trails and completing written podcast script.
3. Learners will demonstrate their understanding of using podcasting technologies to record and edit podcast.
4. Learner will demonstrate understanding of blogs by successfully posting.
Evaluation/Assessment:
Informational writing rubric
Research rubric
Podcasting rubric

FHS Library said...

Kim Crotty
EDC 921 Final Project

My final project was created because of a need to fulfill a requirement for a state grant to create “classrooms for the future.”

PA “Classrooms for the Future” Background Information
Pennsylvania is committed to creating schools that can change to meet the needs of students by providing instruction grounded in rigor and relevance that prepares students for career and college.

A national report released in March 2006 identified three fundamental ideas about today’s high schools that are not yet widely perceived.
• There are results that matter for high school graduates in the 21st century and these are different from and go beyond traditional metrics.
• Improving high schools requires the nation to redefine “rigorous preparation” to encompass not just mastery of core academic subjects but also 21st century skills and content.
• The results that matter – 21st century skills integrated with core academic subjects – should be the model for creating high schools that are truly effective for students and the nation.
(Results That Matter: 21st Century Skills and High School Reform, Partnership for 21st Century Skills)
But America’s high schools are not uniformly delivering on this promise:
Fewer than one in ten adults believe that students are being significantly challenged in high school. Half think that the secondary education system needs either major changes or a complete overhaul. And more than three-quarters of adults believe that the United States will be less competitive twenty-five years from now unless high schools improve.
Ready for the Real World? Americans Speak on High School Reform, Educational Testing Service June 2005

Pennsylvania’s Classrooms for the Future is a bold step toward large-scale high school reform that will deliver 21st Century instruction for the 21st Century learner. This $200 million, three-year initiative is designed to improve teaching and learning in Pennsylvania’s high schools by creating technology-enriched instructional settings in English, math, science, and social studies classes. In addition to assisting us to prepare our students for tomorrow’s postsecondary and workforce opportunities, Classrooms for the Future will support reform models for future classrooms across the nation.

CFF Coaches and CFF Lead Teachers have created a number of wikispaces to help teachers develop classroom approaches, to connect with other technology-oriented classroom teachers, to locate effective resources, and to collaborate with teachers and coaches across the state as schools undergo an exciting and dynamic reform.

Fairview High School is in year two of this state funded grant. The grant was written and submitted in April 2008. In order to get funded part of the grant requirements were to provide opportunities outside of the school for students to learn Web 2.0 tools. This was the perfect opportunity for me to use the skills I learned in EDC 920 and EDC 921 to create a wiki space that teaches users what Web 2.0 is, as well as to introduce the concepts and “how to” for various Web 2.0 tools; while learning the importance of website evaluation.

As my skills develop with Web 2.0 tools, I plan to continually change and update my wikispace to make it a virtual learning place for students, staff, community members and those in our global community.

The link to my wikispace is: https://fairviewhslibrary.wikispaces.com

Donna said...

Donna Esposito
EDC921
Spring 2008
Deliverable #4
Final Project: Implementation of Wiki from Proposal

Introduction:
As a media specialist, I chose to create a final project that has a practical and efficient use for my library environment. Therefore, I decided to implement my proposal for Deliverable #3. The goal of my proposal was to create a wiki for the media center as a means of communicating and collaborating with teachers about research assignments . This final project will be a description of what I am going to include in my wiki and my future plans for this wiki or additional wikis.

As a media specialist, I frequently get requests from teachers to create pathfinders or research guides for class assignment. These pathfinders need to include reliable sources. Sometimes these requests come in at the last minute and I need to create the pathfinder quickly and easily. Often there is very little time to make an update to the library website and publish that update before a class comes into the library to do their research. This is why a wiki is a perfect choice for this environment. In addition, I sometimes get inspired in the evening when I don’t have access to my library website to make update. This wiki can be updated from any location. Lastly, teachers are welcome to edit, update or add content to the pages of the wiki that relate to their class assignment. Each research guide would have its own wiki page and will provide students with reliable book, database and web sources that would enable them to complete their research assignments easily and efficiently.

The majority of the work for this final project has been done on the wiki. Here is the link for this wiki: http://hvcentral.wikispaces.com/


Outline for HVCentral wiki:

1. Home
2. English
• Research paper on Hemingway Short Stories
Includes suggested databases for Literary Criticisms
Includes information on Plagiarism and links to guides on Plagiarism
• Short Story Criticism – includes bookmark to Gale Virtual Reference Library – Short Stories for Students
3. Health
• Research paper on Birth Defects
Suggested search terms, Suggested databases, links to reliable websites
• Brochure on STD’s and Contraceptives
Suggested search terms, Suggested databases, links to reliable websites
4. Mathematics


5. Science
• Brochure on Endangered Species
Suggested databases and links to websites
6. Social Studies
• Decades Research: 1950’s, 1960’s, and 1970’s
Suggested databases, books and my delicious bookmarks
• Imperialism
Suggested search terms, Suggested databases, links to reliable websites
• Treaty of Versailles
Added an Answer Tips widget
• Asia Country Analysis – Table of Contents
• Civil War
• Revolution and Nationalism
Added an Answer Tips widget
• Teddy Roosevelt and the Square Deal
Added an Answer Tips widget
7. Visual & Performing Arts
8. World Languages


Media Center:
• Citations
o This wiki page includes sample citation formats and a Word document with sample formats
o Link to online citation generators
o Link to MLA formats
• Orientation (future)

Tools and Add-ons used in Wiki:
Changed Themes, colors, inserted logo
Anchor links, Tables, Table of Contents
Widgets: del.icio.us, Answer Tips, Calendar

Links:
Media Center Website
Media Center blog
Student Research Guide (new wiki - future)


Future Plans: Once the pathfinder wikis are all established – they will never be complete because a wiki is ongoing, my vision for the long term is to create a district wide “Student Research Guide” – which will include citation information, plagiarism guides, research models and strategies, website evaluation and more. This document would have to be a collaborative effort between school librarians and the English department. The most practical and logical tool for this type of project would be a wiki.
Another addition to this wiki would be pages on library orientation. This September will be my first library orientation at this school, I like to incorporate everything I do for orientation into the wiki.

Donna said...

Kim,
I really like the Fairview HS wiki. I may even use some of your ideas in my wiki. I included some Web 2.0 explanations in my blog, but I'm thinking about adding them to my wiki too. Students do go to the wiki for their assignments, but I'm not so sure they are visiting the blog. I also like the evaluating Wikipedia page.

Dave, I really enjoyed this class. I learned a lot, but there is still so much more to go.

I'm signing off to go putter in my garden and relax until the storm comes in (my daughter is returning home this evening from her 1st year at college.)

Have a great summer everyone.

bream said...

Teen Issues Project

Barb Ream
HS Family and Consumer Science Dept.
Human Development II Class
Central York High School
York, PA 1402
bream@cysd.k12.pa.us

Introduction:
This unit will be taught in my Human Development II class. During this unit students will be required to choose a current teen issue topic, such as eating disorders, gangs, and substance abuse. The students will complete research on that topic. The students will present their research to the class in a formal presentation.

Standards Addressed in this unit:
CYFSHD2.1.1.01 Identify physical, social, emotional, and cognitive development
occurring during adolescence.
CYFSHD2.1.1.02 Examine contributions of selected developmental theories.
CYFSHD2.1.1.03 Identify and locate community support systems that provide services
for individuals and families.
CYFSHD2.1.1.08 Analyze current issues and challenges affecting the adolescent.

Goals of this unit: The student will:
• Use their writing skills to respond to writing prompts.
• Post their responses onto a blog.
• Research a teen issue
• Find resources for teen issue
• Post resources to a wiki
• Develop a teen issue presentation
• Podcast their presentation and put onto the classroom wiki.


Before beginning any activities, the teacher will make sure that the students all have email accounts through www.gaggle.net. The students will have checked to make sure that their email is up and running. The students will know the address to the classroom blog and classroom wiki. The students will know how to access both of these and how to post to both.






Lesson 1:
Pre-Activity:
The students will brainstorm a list of current teen issues. The teacher will list them on the board. The students will then rank their top four choices on a piece of paper. The teacher will collect and assign each student a teen issue based on his or her interest level. Each student will receive a different topic.

Writing Assignment:
Once the student has received their teen topic, they will go to the classroom blog and respond to the question, “Why did you pick this topic as one of your top four choices?” and “What are your ideas for presenting this information to the class?” The students will respond to each other offering input and suggestions, as well as the teacher offering advice.

Extension:
The students will begin to gather information on their teen topic outside of school.

Assessment:
The students will be given a rubric by which their blog entries will be graded.

Lesson 2:
The students will spend time searching the Internet for information on various hotlines, help lines, and support groups for their particular teen issue. They will be required to find local, state, and national organizations that deal with helping teens with this issue. They will need to list the resource that they found, along with the address, phone number, email, and a description of the resource as it pertains to their topic. The students will then log on to our classroom wiki and create a new page, which they will title it whatever their teen issue is. On their new page they will list all of the information listed above.

Writing Assignment:
On our classroom blog the students will respond to the question, “How do you think that the resources you gathered will be of assistance to someone with that particular issue?” Students will be required to respond to at least one classmates posting.

Assessment:
The students will be given a rubric by which their wiki and blog entries will be graded.

Lesson 3:
The librarian will come into our classroom to show students where they can find information on their topic using various databases. She will also review the MLA citation format.

Students will be given time to work on finding resources for their chosen topic.

Writing Assignment:
The students will respond to the following question on our classroom blog, “What type of information did you find today and how will it help you with your presentation.”

Assessment:
The students will be given a rubric by which their blog entries will be graded. (See blog rubric above).


Lesson 4-6:
The students will be given class time to work on finding resources for their presentation. They will be allowed to use the Internet, databases, and our library. They will also be permitted to make calls, if they wish, to local resources to gather additional information.

Writing Assignment:
The students will respond to the following question on our classroom blog, “What type of information did you find today and how will it help you with your presentation.”

Assessment:
The students will be given a rubric by which their blog entries will be graded. (See blog rubric above).

Lesson 7:
The students will be putting their presentation together. They will decide how they would like to present their findings. They will be given the class period to put their presentation together. They will have computers, cameras, video cameras, and art supplies available for them to use.

Writing Assignment:
The students will respond to the following question on our classroom blog, “How will you present your information to the class?”

Assessment:
The students will be given a rubric by which their blog entries will be graded. (See blog rubric above).



Lesson 8 - ?: (This depends on the number of students in the class)

The students will present their presentations. They will be allotted 30 – 45 minutes. Within their presentation, they must give us information about their topic, as well as have the class complete some activity with them to reinforce what they taught us.

Writing Assignment:
The students will respond to the following question on our classroom blog, “How do you think your presentation went?” Each member of the class must provide feedback to the student that presented.

Assessment:
The students will be given a rubric by which their blog entries will be graded. (See blog rubric above). The students will also be given a rubric, by which their presentation will be graded. (See at end of lesson plans).

Follow-up Lesson:
Each student will take his or her presentation and podcast it. They will record their voice and find graphics that they could add to their voice. When their podcast is complete, they will place it on our classroom wiki to share with others.

Writing Assignment:
The students will respond to the following question on our classroom blog, “What did you learn from this project”?

Assessment:
The students will be given a rubric by which their podcast and blog entries will be graded.

joannak said...

Joanna Knott
Librarian, PA

I have selected to create a wiki for my final project. You may view it at http://thefiftystates.wikispaces.com/

This project was created for a fourth grade class research project on the Fifty States. Enjoy!

I also would like to add that this has probably been the best graduate course I've taken in a very long time (and I've taken 69 credits in 6 years!!) Thank you, Mr. Fontaine, for all of your help and expertise. Hopefully the rest of my teachers will begin to embrace the Read/Write Web!

Joanna Knott

Anne Howard said...

I looked a Joanna's wiki and wish I had something like this when I was teaching 4th grade Social Studies. The two video clips worked perfectly for the purpose.

What you are doing with your wiki is the goal of the final piece of my unit - group collaboration. Hopefully it will be easier to implement with students than it has been with adults. I tried using it to organize an after school faculty event. Two of us on the committee used it - the other members preferred long e-mails. Oh well, maybe next year.

I also want to set up a library wiki similar to what Donna is doing. I'll work on this over the summer when there is time to think about where I want to start. A K-8 school's needs are a bit different from a high school, but I've gotten some good ideas from looking at what other class members have created.

I just got back from a 3 day technology conference. Most of the discussions in the sessions centered around web 2.0 technologies. Three months ago I would have been totally lost in the discussions but I was more than able to hold my own in the discussions and actually sound like I know what I'm talking about. There's still a lot more to learn, but I've got a great foundation of knowledge to build upon.

Anne Howard said...

I posted my final project on the wiki. It's a bit to long to post it all here. This unit covers teaching the steps in writing a research paper. I wrote it for seventh grade, but it would work with any middle school student group. There are additional supporting documents attached.

Karen said...

Karen Kment
EDC921-2008
Deliverable #4
Final Project: Implementation of Class Blog

Teaching Unit – Social Studies

Topic – The State of Rhode Island

This unit will take place over the course of half a marking period. In our district we teach Science and Social Studies for half a quarter. Some activities/lessons will take more than one day. As with good teaching practices, the teacher will need to update the lessons and modify to the students needs and pace.

Pre – Activities:
• Students will post on the class blog the following: What they know about the state of Rhode Island, What they want to know about Rhode Island, and What they learned about Rhode Island. This will be similar to a (K-W-L Chart, graphic organizer) Discussions will be based on what students already know and want to know. The third part of this graphic organizer should be completed when the unit is wrapping up.
• A field trip to the Slater Mill and discussion on the start of the industrial revolution (pictures will be posted in a slide show on the blog)
• Students will respond to the question posted on the blog. “What was your favorite fact that you learned at the Slater Mill.”
• Students will search Wikipedia for information about Rhode Island to be used later in a report on a topic of their choice on Rhode Island.

Lesson #1 and #2

Introduction: Students will review the state of Rhode Island on a map. Each student will be given a town to look up on google.earth.com.

Goals: Students will gain background knowledge about the state of Rhode Island and its location on a map. Students will review geography skills using a map of Rhode Island.

After reviewing the map of Rhode Island and locating their home town, students will complete a booklet with basic facts on Rhode Island with information on the state bird, state flag, and state flower. Students will draw pictures of these topics from a downloaded picture. They can then be scanned later and used in a power point presentation with their final report. Students will begin to brainstorm possible topics for their report on Rhode Island.

Lesson #3

Students will be quizzed on the information from the basic fact booklet.

Goal: Students will learn about the Rhode Island flag and what the symbols stand for.

Students will view and study the flag of Rhode Island and learn the year it was adopted. A discussion will be held about the thirteen stars and what they symbolize, as well as the words “Hope.” The discussion will also include information regarding the anchor and how it united the four original towns under a single charter.

Questions to be posted and then answered on the blog:

• When did Rhode Island become a state?

• What do the 13 stars on the Rhode Island flag symbolize?

• When was Rhode Island’s flag adopted?

Students will then create their own Rhode Island flag using a template. These will then be scanned and placed on the blog.

Lesson #4

Students will research “famous firsts” in Rhode Island.

Goal: Students will share famous facts about Rhode Island.

Brainstorm possible topics including famous women, churches, politicians, entertainment, monuments, buildings, and sports that have occurred in Rhode Island history.

Once students have chosen a topic of interest they will use a graphic organizer which will help them search for information on wikipedia. Complete the graphic organizer. Students will peer-conference with a partner and then the teacher on the information that has been collected.

Lesson #5 –
Revisit the K-W-L chart to include information on what students have learned so far.
Students will work on creating a timeline on their nonfiction topic. They will continue research and then organize the events into a timeline that can be used with their report.

Lesson # 6

Students will use a graphic organizer to write a report on the blog about their topic

Goal: Students will compose a report including information about their Rhode Island topic. Information that needs to be included will be from the graphic organizer. This will contain the history of the topic depending on their choice. Some focus questions may include: Why is it famous? What is the impact it has made on Rhode Island’s history? A minimum of 10 facts need to be included. They will write their report and present the final draft to the class in an “author’s tea” which will include parents as guests.



Extension: Students will construct a three dimensional model that will correlate to their written report. It will be presented with the report. Students will also create an activity for the class to complete about their presentation. Some suggestions include a word search, jeopardy game, puzzle, reenactment involving members of the audience.

Rubric for non fiction report and three dimensional projects:

• Cover and illustration – 10 pts.
• Report is organized and contains a minimum of 10 facts – 20 pts.
• Three dimensional artifact is authentic and it is evident that the student used their best effort. – 20 pts.
• Conventions such as correct grammar and punctuation has been used -20 pts.
• Spelling and loaded language is included – 15 pts.
• Effort: It is evident that the student used their best effort throughout the project -15 pts.



Lesson #7

After the extension is completed, students will write a written response to either one or both of the following prompts on the blog:

What did you enjoy the most about this project?

What will you remember?



Standards Addressed in this unit:

GSE (HP1) Historical Perspectives Strand
• HP 1 (3-4) – 1 Students act as historians using a variety of tools (ex: classifying artifacts, making predictions, classifying symbols from long ago and today and describing how they add to our understanding of the past, organizing information obtained to answer historical questions.
• HP 1 (3-4) – 2 Students interpret history as a series of connected events with multiple cause-effect relationships by…a) describing and organizing a sequence of significant events in Rhode Island history. (e.g., interpreting and analyzing a timeline)

GSE (HP2) History is a chronicle of human activities, diverse people, and the societies they form.
• HP (3-4) – 2 Students chronicle events and conditions by…
a. Describing, defining, and illustrating by example Rhode Island historical individuals, groups and events. (e.g., Roger Williams, Native Americans) and how they relate to the context
GSE (HP3) the study of history helps us understand the present and shape the future.
• HP (3-4) – 1 Students demonstrate an understanding of how the past frames the present by…
a. Recognizing and interpreting how events, people, problems, or ideas shape life in the community and in Rhode Island.
• HP (3-4) – 2 Students make personal connections in a historical context (e.g., source to source, source to self, source to world) by…
A. using a variety of sources (e.g., photographs, written text, clothing, oral history) to reconstruct their past, understand the present, and make predictions for the future.


Differentiated Instruction:
• For motivated students: Implement a blog of their own on their report for Rhode Island
• Students with special needs can pair with another student to complete their power point presentation and/or blog.
• Modifications in the length of the report and presentation

Post Activities:

• Power point presentation on Rhode Island topic which will be posted on the blog
• Field Trip to the State House (scheduled for May 28, 2008)
• Guest speaker – former Governor Bruce Sundlun will come into the classroom and answer questions. Pictures will be taken and put on a slide show for parents and students to view.
• Guest speaker – Chief Brown, National Indian Preservation Officer, Narragansett Indian Tribe. Pictures will be taken and put on a slide show for parents and students to view.

A Pisani said...

Like Anne, I also felt like my unit was a big lengthy for the blog, so I posted it right to the wiki. It is a Geometry unit plan on Polygons that culminates in a tessellations project that has both a written and visual component.
I learned a great deal in this class and I am really looking forward to extending my use of blogs to my geometry and algebra 1 classes! I'm still thinking about how to best use a wiki, but I'll get there! Thanks, Dave for a great class, and thanks to everyone else for posting such great comments, feedback, and ideas!

Jennifer Long said...

As a board member and webmaster of the Rhode Island Educational Media Association, I am always looking for ways to better communicate with members. I have developed a new website for RIEMA that will “go live” soon, (http://www.riema.org ) and I recently attended the 2008 RIEMA Conference, where I previewed the website and received feedback from members. Some said they wished they had a resource about the conference to refer to, both now and in the future. I was inspired to create a conference wiki for attendees, located at http://riema08.wikispaces.com . I will link the wiki to the new RIEMA website, combining Web 1.0 with Web 2.0 technology to provide the best of both tools. As Julie Lindsay illuminated during her K12 Online Conference (http://k12onlineconference.org/?p=74), it is important for educators to develop a personal/professional learning environment (PLE), linking collaborative projects, initiatives, research, and more. The Web 1.0 site will be a starting point for RIEMA information, and the conference wiki will foster the type of Web 2.0 collaboration we can link to as part of our PLEs.

For details about the project, see the 921 wiki.

Anonymous said...

Melissa Berenberg
Reading Teacher
EDC 921
Final Project

Unit: Persuasive Writing
Informational Technology Tools: Wiki, Blog, Videoblog, Internet
Grade 3

This unit will be taught over a two week span and consists of 6 lessons.
Several lessons will be taught in two 45 minute sessions due to computer use and complexity of information literacy skills.


Introduction to Unit

This year in the District, a writing committee has developed writing benchmark assessments. The assessments include grade level prompts and rubrics. Our individual school also has a main focus on writing for this year and the upcoming school year. We have had several professional development opportunities in order to develop a more effective writing curriculum and have gathered many resources to add to our tool box. The basis for this persuasive writing unit is to provide an additional support for the teachers to improve in this area of need. By integrating technology tools with this genre study, students will be able to improve on their written expression in new ways. These tools will provide them with positive motivation as well as the necessary skills to be successful.

Unit Standards

Rhode Island GLE’s

W-3-10 Students will use pre-writing, drafting, revising, editing, and critiquing to produce final drafts of written products

W-3-11 Sharing thoughts, observations, or impressions

W-3.8 In informational writing students demonstrate use of a range of elaboration strategies
8.1 Details/Information relating to topic
8.2 Details/Information relevant to focus

OC-4.1 In oral communication students demonstrate interactive listening

R-3-15 Gathering information and using a graphic organizer

Lesson 1:

Objectives
Students will listen and respond to a persuasive text
Students will write I wonder questions about blogging
Students will analyze and interpret informational text and cite evidence

Pre-Activities
Students will listen to The True Story Of The 3 Little Pigs! as told by Jon Scieszka. A class discussion will be held discussing the story, citing evidence, and relating the text to aspects of persuasion. We will create a chart on what we already know on persuasive writing and add additional information from the text.

Lesson Activities
As a class, we will write a persuasive writing piece told by one of the three little pigs. Students will use a graphic organizer that states the opinion, three reasons, supporting details and a concluding re-stated opinion. Students will then individually write the wolf’s response to the pig’s persuasive speech. The class blog on persuasive writing will be used to publish pieces from this unit. Students will be shown how to access the class blog and upload the persuasive speech created by the whole class.

Conclusion
Students will share their writing with a partner. Then students will create a list of I wonder questions about persuasive writing and our class blog. Comments and questions will be posted to the blog.

Assessment
Informal observations and anecdotal notes will be taken for assessment. A checklist will be used to identify student learning and understanding during this unit.

Adaptions/Accomodations
Students will listen to the story for the second time. Students can listen to the story on tape and/or read on their own. . For different learning abilities, students will be encouraged to use pictures, sound, voice, and written language. ELL students will be paired with a partner for extra support. Students experiencing difficulties will be paired with other students and/or receive extra instruction in a small group or as an individual. Students who have difficulties with written language will use Microsoft word to complete their assignment.


Extension Activities
Students can act out the persuasive speech within a small group. Students will be encouraged to work on fluency and pay attention to punctuation.

Students can practice using the blog and exploring its components.
Students can write another persuasive speech from the perspective of another pig.

Lesson 2:

Objectives
Students will complete a graphic organizer with ideas for persuasive writing
Students will compose a different ending to a text
Students will write in response to text

Pre-Activities
Students will listen to The Gingerbread Man told by Rita Rose. The ending of the story will be left out. Students will orally brainstorm ideas for why the fox should not eat the gingerbread man. Students will turn to a partner to discuss possible reasons and supporting details that the gingerbread man would use for his persuasive argument. These reasons will be added to a chart that displays the graphic organizer that they will be expected to use.

Lesson Activities
Students will turn and talk with a different partner discussing possible reasons that they will use for their persuasive piece. Students will work independently to fill out their graphic organizer. After their work is completed, they will add their graphic organizer to the class blog. Students will also post comments predicting how the fox might react to their argument.

Conclusion
As a class, we will add to the chart of ideas from the student’s work. We will comment on what we like about the reasons, and how we can improve on supporting details.

Assessment
Informal observations and anecdotal notes will be taken for assessment. Graphic organizers will be collected and checked for understanding.

Adaptions/Accomodations
Students can act out their reasons, create visuals, and/or record their ideas on tape.
Students will listen to the story for the second time. Students can listen to the story on tape and/or read on their own. . For different learning abilities, students will be encouraged to use pictures, sound, voice, and written language. ELL students will be paired with a partner for extra support. Students experiencing difficulties will be paired with other students and/or receive extra instruction in a small group or as an individual. Students who have difficulties with written language will use Microsoft word to complete their assignment.

Extension Activities
Students can create ideas from the fox’s perspective

Students can compose visuals from the The Gingerbread Man

Students can compare and contrast The Gingerbread Man to The True Story Of The 3 Little Pigs.

Lesson 3:

Objectives
Students will compose a rough draft with the use of a graphic organizer
Students will add details relating to their main focus
Students will create effective lead statements

Pre-Activities
Students will write effective leads geared for the fox and appropriate to the text. They will write a rough draft based on the information gathered from the text and their graphic organizer. Students will add transition words and details to their rough draft. Students will peer review their leads and provide constructive criticism.

Conclusion
Student volunteers will share their leads and the types of transition words and details that were added to their rough draft. We will have a whole class discussion on how transition words and details added clarity to the writing piece. Comments and work samples will be added to class blog.

Assessment
Informal observations and anecdotal notes will be taken for assessment. Rough Drafts will be analyzed and checked for understanding during one- on -one conferences.


Adaptions/Accomodations
Extra examples of leads will be displayed and orally read for students. A chart of transition words will be provided for extra support. ELL students will be paired with a partner for extra support. Students experiencing difficulties will be paired with other students and/or receive extra instruction in a small group or as an individual. Students who have difficulties with written language will use Microsoft word or a Neo to complete their rough draft. The Gingerbread man story will be displayed with text and visuals.

Extension Activities

Students will create different types of leads

Students will view videoblogs from youtube.com relating to writing

Students will read edublogs on persuasive writing


Lesson 4:

Objectives
Students will edit their rough drafts with the use of a wiki
Students will add details to improve their writing
Students will critique written products

Pre-Activities
As a whole class, we will edit, add details and critique an example of a persuasive piece. Students will share the pen to make corrections, re-read for clarity, and use transitional words. Students will turn to a partner to discuss the importance of editing, revising, and adding details in order to enhance a written product. Students will be introduced to a new tool known as a wiki. We will cut and paste the original persuasive piece of writing used during the pre-activities. Then student volunteers will edit the writing with the tool bar on the wiki.

Lesson Activities
Students will add their persuasive writing piece to the wiki. Then they will make additions to the written piece and practice using the wiki as a tool for improving writing. Students will use their graphic organizer, rough draft, transitional word list, and editing checklist to help them with editing their piece. Students will also practice saving their new additions and how to find them.

Conclusion
As a class, we will add a hyperlink to our persuasive class blog of the wiki. We will use a student’s example of the work on a wiki and students will share on what they liked about the wiki and what areas they needed more help with.

Assessment
Informal observations and anecdotal notes will be taken for assessment. Rough drafts will be analyzed and checked for understanding during one- on -one conferences.


Adaptions/Accomodations
Extra examples of how to edit a writing piece will be displayed and orally read for students. A chart of transition words will be provided for extra support. An editing checklist with text and visuals will be displayed for extra guidance. ELL students will be paired with a partner for extra support. Students experiencing difficulties will be paired with other students and/or receive extra instruction in a small group or as an individual. Students who have difficulties with written language will use Microsoft word or a Neo to complete their editions. Peer students will assist with the use of the wiki.

Extension Activities

Students will practice writing and editing with the wiki

Students will view videoblogs from youtube.com

Students will read and view wikis on writing


Lesson 5:

Objectives
Students will peer edit their rough draft on the wiki
Students will publish their persuasive writing piece on the class blog
Students will share thoughts, impressions, and observations on the Unit


Pre-Activities
With the use of a rubric, we will evaluate a sample of the final product. We will create a list of evidence that correlates with the rubric and assign a score. We will also discuss how the product could have been improved.

Lesson Activities
Students will finish writing their rough draft and publish their final product. Students will use the rubric to guide them through the publishing process. With the use of the class blog, students will upload their final product. They will also add graphic features and audio if desired. Students will also write a paragraph on what they learned and enjoyed from the Unit on blogs, wikis, and persuasive writing.


Conclusion
In small groups, students will show their published pieces and use the rubric to assess each other’s work. Student volunteers will show their work with the whole class and will comment on ways to improve and provide positive comments on the individual work. Students will also respond with I wonder questions for each non-fiction piece. These comments and questions will be posted on the class blog.


Assessment for Final Product

Students will be assessed with a 4 point rubric

4- The task is completed with an extraordinary lead statement, more than 3 reasons with supporting details, concluding statement, and that contains additional, unexpected, or outstanding features.

3- The task is completed correctly and there is a lead, 3 reasons with supporting details, concluding statement

2- The task is partially complete and there is some missing information.

1- The student did not complete the task or gives an assignment that has nothing to do with what was asked.

Adaptions/Accomodations
Extra examples of how to edit a writing piece will be displayed and orally read for students. A chart of transition words will be provided for extra support. An editing checklist with text and visuals will be displayed for extra guidance. ELL students will be paired with a partner for extra support. Students experiencing difficulties will be paired with other students and/or receive extra instruction in a small group or as an individual. Students who have difficulties with written language will use Microsoft word or a Neo to complete their editions. Peer students will assist with the use of the wiki.

Extension Activities

Students will practice writing and editing with the wiki

Students will view videoblogs from youtube.com

Students will read and view wikis on writing



Lesson 6:

Objectives
Students will edit a peer’s persuasive writing piece
Students will use the rubric to assess writing
Students will self-reflect on a final writing product

Pre-Activities
We will review the list of evidence that correlates with the rubric from the previous lesson’s writing. We will also discuss more thoroughly how the product could have been improved. We will make additional revisions and decide which writing piece we liked better and why.

Lesson Activities
Students will be paired with a partner. Each group will work together in order to improve on one of their writing pieces. They will make several revisions and then decide upon which one they liked the most. Students will use the rubric to guide them with the expectations. Revisions will be done on the wiki and the one they like most will be added to the class blog.

Conclusion
Each group of students will share their favorite version and the steps they took to improve on their writing. Students will discuss different writing elements such as author’s voice, descriptive language, word choice etc. to cite evidence to their reasoning in their selection. As a whole class, we will come up with a chart on different ways to make improvements.

Assessment
Students will be assessed on how well they collaborated together and explained their reasoning. A checklist will be provided for student’s to self-reflect on their collaboration as well. Informal observations and anecdotal records will be made throughout the lesson.

Adaptions/Accomodations
Extra examples of how to edit a writing piece will be displayed and orally read for students. A chart of transition words will be provided for extra support. An editing checklist with text and visuals will be displayed for extra guidance. ELL students will be paired with a partner for extra support. Students experiencing difficulties will be paired with other students and/or receive extra instruction in a small group or as an individual. Students who have difficulties with written language will use Microsoft word or a Neo to complete their editions. Peer students will assist with the use of the wiki.

Extension Activities

Students will revise other children’s writing on the wiki

Students will view videoblogs from youtube.com

Students will write additional persuasive writing pieces

Rosemary Driscoll said...

Final Project
Rosemary Driscoll
Library Media Specialist
Edward R. Martin Middle School
East Providence, RI 02914
rdriscoll@epschoolsri.com

Introduction

In collaboration with the 8th grade House B team, I will be working with 8th grade students to develop wikis for their final assignment. This unit will span the final four weeks of school and is multidisciplinary. Specifically, the unit is an exploration of decades. Students are grouped heterogeneously together to research and investigate their assigned decade. Each group will have specific criteria to meet including:

• Research assigned decade in one of four categories:
Entertainment, Literature, Politics, Science/Technology
• Find TEN events on your topic
• Become an expert on 2
• List ten events on the wiki
• Write one page on two of these events and post on wiki


Goals

My first goal is to foster opportunities for students to develop critical thinking skills in terms of accessing and using information. That is, through instruction and the use of checklists and evaluation forms, students will access, select, evaluate, and use information in order to create an informative wiki. My second goal for this unit is to expose students to the creation and use of wikis. Specifically, students will learn how to create a wiki for a classroom assignment and gain
an understanding of using wikis to enhance their learning experiences.


Standards

The standards used for this component of the unit will be the Information Literacy Standards for Student Learning, prepared by the American Association of School Libraries, Association for Educational Communications and Technology.
Information Literacy.doc










Library Lesson One: Using an Online Database

Information Literacy Standard 1, the student who is information literate accesses information efficiently and effectively.
Information Literacy Standard 2, the student who is information literate evaluates information critically and competently.
Information Literacy Standard 3, the student who is information literate uses information accurately and creatively.
Information Literacy Standards for Student Learning.doc

Goals

Students will use the library computers to access Word Book Online via the East Providence Public Library website using the MMS library card.

PreActivities

Students will brainstorm ideas about the best online source for looking up information on decades, including major events, discoveries, inventions, people, popular culture, sports, etc. After students decide that Google is the best way, Mrs. Driscoll will explain about using the online databases available to them through the East Providence Public Library. Among the available databases is World Book Online. I tell students that this is what we’ll be using for today’s exercise.
Students now brainstorm the best search terms to use for looking up decade information. Perhaps using terms like “The Sixties, the 1960s, Decades, History of
The Twenties.”
presearch worksheet.doc

Procedure

Students will open Internet Explorer and go to website: www.Eastprovidencelibrary.org
Students will click on Library Catalog
Students will click on Reference Resource Center
Students will click on Access World Book Online from Home
Students type in barcode number written on white board
Students type in search terms in search box to find information










Library Lesson 2 Evaluating a Website

IL Standard 2, 3

Goals

Students need to look critically at Internet websites in order to determine what reliable, valid information looks like. This is a skill not limited to information on the Internet but applies to book, magazine, and other sources of information as well. This lesson will have students look at websites with a critical eye with specific criteria to use as a guide.

Preactivity

Ask students what they prefer to use to look up information for school assignments.
After they reply “using Google,” explore the possibilities of other sources of information.
Ask student if all of the information they find on the Internet can be reliable.
Discuss and have students take notes on the potential problems with using the Internet for research, for example:
Authorship. Is the page written by a paid sponsor? Is the page sponsored by a university or government organization? A third grade class?
Currency Does the page offer dates? How current is the source? Does it matter for your project?
Relevance Does the website really answer your question? Does the website provide links to further information? Does the website offer a variety of types of information like, video clips, podcasts, and pictures?
Appearance Is the website easy to navigate? Is it easy to access?


Procedure

Have students go to three or more websites on a topic of their choice. Distribute website evaluation form for students to fill out.
website evaluation form.doc

Assessment

After completion of website evaluation for, students regroup and discuss results in class.

Extension Activity

Create your own website evaluation tool and compare it to the checklist provided in class.








Library Lesson 3 Using Internet Sources

Information Literacy Standards 1, 2, 3
AASL Information Literacy Standards for Student Learning.doc
Goals

Students will use library computers to access the Internet for information on their decade’s projects. Students will find one article, one blog, one podcast, and one wiki.

Pre-Activities

Students will fill out preresearch worksheet to choose key words, search terms and phrases
Mrs. Driscoll provides an overview of Boolean operators: AND, OR, NOT
Students will brainstorm what they know and don’t know about Blogs, Podcasts, and Wikis
Brainstorming.doc

Procedure

Students open Internet Explorer, go to Google
Students use previously identified key words, search terms and phrases to search Google
For information on their topics
Students find ten events for their topic
Students choose two of those events to research further
Students will create a folder to save and organize their information (pictures, podcasts, and videocasts) for use on their wikis
In addition, students will use graphic organizer to gather information and make research notes
Research Notes.doc

Assessment

Teacher fills out assessment checklist
Assessment Checklist.doc









Library Lesson 4 Creating a Wiki

IL Standard 2-2
AASL Information Literacy Standards for Student Learning.doc

Goals

Students will create and use a wiki using the computers in the media center.

Materials

LCD Projector/Laptop
Whiteboard

Preactivity

Ask student if they’ve ever heard the word wiki. Most will answer yes, they’ve
used wikipedia. Ask students what they think a wiki is. Write responses on whiteboard.

Procedure
Students use computers in the library with Mrs. Driscoll and Mrs. O’Halloran to learn about wikis through online demonstration using laptop and Projector. The following website will be used to demonstrate:
http://coollesson.wikispaces.com/How-to-use-a-wiki



Assessment

Wiki Grading Rubric.doc





















Bibliography

American Library Association. American Association of School Libraries.
Information Literacy Standards For Student Learning


“How To Use A Wiki.” http://coollessons.wikispaces.com/How-to-use-a-wiki
(April 29, 2008).


Hefler, Norma. Information Literacy and Technology
Englewood, CO: Libraries Unlimited, 2001.


“Teacher Tap: Evaluating Internet Resources.” http://eduscapes.com/tap/topic32.htm


“21st Century Literacies: Lesson Evaluating Websites.”
http://www.kn.pacbell.com/wired/21stcent/index.html
(April 27, 2008).

Joan O'Halloran said...

Final Project
EDC921
Joan O’Halloran
Rosemary Driscoll
Martin Middle School, East Providence, RI

Decades Integrated Unit

Overview: Using a variety of sources, small groups of students work together to investigate decades of the 20th century. Each group member chooses to research one of the following categories:

• Entertainment – including music, fads and fashions, movies, television, radio, toys, etc
• Literature – books, authors, publishers, Pulitzer Prize winners, advertising, etc.
• Science/Technology – inventors, inventions, discoveries, catastrophic events
• Politics – presidents and first ladies, elections, elected officials, wars, conflicts, scandals

From their research, each group will create a presentation that teaches others about their decade. Students will choose a category and then be placed heterogeneously into groups of four students. Project time will be blocked in the schedule to take advantage of computer labs and the media center. Presentations may be PowerPoints or posters, and several groups will create their presentations using web 2.0 technologies. All presentations need audio and visual components, and a complete bibliography.

**Several groups will work with Mrs. O’Halloran, science teacher, and Mrs. Driscoll, librarian, to create their presentations on wikis. Students’ prior knowledge of wikis is limited to using Wikipedia. This unit includes lessons on using technology

Goals: Students will develop an awareness of how the core subjects: English, social studies, mathematics, and science relate to each other. Students will also gain experience with Web 2.0 technology through the use of wikis.


SCIENCE

Standards/Unifying Themes of Science

• Nature of Science: Accumulation of science knowledge
• History of Science
• Science/Technology/Society

Objectives:

1. demonstrate connections among core subjects
2. briefly discuss 10 significant science/technology related events and become an expert on 2 events
3. *use web 2.0 technologies (create a wiki that includes hyperlinked text, audio and visuals; OR create a PowerPoint or poster
4. develop writing and presentation skills
5. develop skills and strategies to evaluate information
6. gather and use information for research purposes

(The following lessons are written for students who will be piloting the project using Web 2.0 technology. Mrs. Driscoll and Mrs. O’Halloran are collaborating on this pilot project)

Lesson One: Scavenger Hunt

Objectives:
1. complete a scavenger hunt in order to become familiar with events from each category in a 20th century decade

Procedure:
• Read through scavenger hunt with students.
• Students will use print resources and the Internet to complete the scavenger hunt.
• Monitor progress.
• Conference briefly with each group before end of period.


Lesson Two: Introduction to Research

Objectives:
1. use the library computers to access Word Book Online
2. complete a pre-research worksheet

Procedure:
• brainstorm ideas about best online sources for information
• Mrs. Driscoll will show students how to use online databases available through East Providence public Library.
• Students will use World Book Online for today’s exercise
• Brainstorm best search terms
• Assign computers and pass out pre-research worksheet
• Monitor progress
• Assess completed worksheets

Lesson Three: Evaluating a Website

Objectives:
1. evaluate websites with regard to authorship, currency, relevance, and appearance
2. complete a website evaluation form

Procedure:
• brainstorm a list of search engines
• Ask: Is all information on the internet reliable?
• Discuss and have students take notes on the potential problems with using the internet for research, for example:
• Authorship: Is the page written by a paid sponsor? I the page sponsored by a university? Government? 3rd grade class?
• Currency: Does the page offer dates? How current is the source? Does it matter for your project?
• Relevance: Does the website really answer your question? Does the website provide links to further information? Does the website offer a variety of types of information – video clips, podcasts, and pictures?
• Appearance: Is the website easy to navigate? Is it easy to access?
• Have students go to three or more websites on a topic of their choice. Distribute website evaluation form for students to fill out as they research.
• Monitor student progress
• Regroup and discuss results in class
• Assess: observations, participation in discussion, worksheet

Lesson 4: Creating a Wiki

Objectives:
1. create and use a wiki using the computers in the media center

Procedure:
• writing prompt: What is a wiki?
• Share responses and correct misconceptions
• Mrs. Driscoll and Mrs. O’Halloran will use http://coollesson.wikispaces.com/How-to-use-a-wiki to demonstrate how to use a wiki
• Have students practice navigating, editing, and hyperlinking a page on Wikipedia
• Assign each group a wiki and each student a page, students will work on their own page and post to the group page

Lesson 5: Research

Objectives:
1. use the internet to collect research
2. find 10 significant events in assigned decade/category; briefly discuss 8 and write several paragraphs on 2
3. find a podcast and a video related to decade
4. hyperlink at least 2 words/phrase to clarify information for the reader
5. store notes etc., on individual wiki page and post to group wiki

Procedure:
• Students will spend several days researching and developing their wikis. Mrs. Driscoll and Mrs. O’Halloran will monitor student progress and advise students as needed.

Lesson 6: Presentations

Students will present their wikis via the LCD project in the auditorium. Following is a rubric for the wiki. Thanks to Victoria A. Davis for the elements used in this rubric.

Element Possible
Points Self Teacher
Collaboration – cooperated with peers, stayed focused and on task, helpful to group
5
Visual Appeal – graphics are used as needed and add to the message. Graphics are not distracting and used where needed to further explain a topic. It does not look cluttered.

10
¬Hyperlinks to Sources – at least 2 hyperlinks/category are included and work

10
Original, Intelligent Wording – wording is intelligent, meaningful, and in the student’s own words

15
Spelling/grammar/punctuation – project is free of errors
15
Assignment – general criteria of the assignment are met
35
Multi-sensory Tools are Used – at least one video and one podcast are included and help to explain the topic
10

TOTAL 110

Karen said...

I have to say that the final projects have so much information and variations in them that I will be spending hours reviewing them this summer. I will have a chance to disect,intergrate, and incorporate some of the strategies into my own curriculum.

I've learned so much from this course. I was intimidated at first at the idea of blogging and using wikis. I have to admit I will need more practice with using wikis, however I feel I've gained a stong baseline to begin with.

The students and parents of my classroom are very enthusiastic about my class blog. That has been very rewarding to me.

There is only one other teacher in my school besides myself that has a class blog. We are now attempting to schedule a professional day to introduce the many doors that using a blog and wiki can unlock. Thank you Dave for helping with this educational tool. My students now want to produce work on the blog daily.

Everyone should be commended for an outstanding job. The final projects are outlined with great detail and will be powerful resources for the future.

I wish you all a stessfree end of the school year and a wonderful summer. Happy Blogging!

JPolinick said...

EDC 921 Final Project
John Polinick
Grade 6
Robert F. Kennedy Elementary School
Providence, RI, 02908

Introduction: This unit titled Global Warming, The Human Difference will be used with my sixth grade class. These students are heterogeneously mixed and spend the entire day in my classroom. The lessons will consist of various topics relating to global warming and human effects on global ecosystems. The unit lessons will be related to many of the core content areas taught in my classroom. Science, reading, writing, and technology lessons will all be used throughout this unit of study.
Timeline: The unit will take place during a span of approximately 3 weeks.(15 Lessons)
The Following Standards will all be met during the course of the 15 lessons planned.
Standards:
Reading NECAP GLE Standards:
R-6-5.1 Explaining or supporting logical predictions (e.g., providing evidence from text to explain why something is likely to happen next)
R-6-5.5 Identifying author's message or theme
R-6-7.1 Obtaining information from text features (e.g., table of contents, glossary, index, transition words /phrases, bold or italicized text, headings, subheadings, graphic organizers, charts, graphs, or illustrations)
R-6-7.3 Organizing information to show understanding (e.g., representing main/central ideas or details within text through charting, mapping, paraphrasing, summarizing, or comparing/contrasting)
R-6-8.1 Connecting information within a text or across texts
R-6-8.3 Drawing inferences about text, including author's purpose (e.g., to inform, explain, entertain, persuade) or message; or forming and supporting opinions/judgments and assertions about central ideas that are relevant
R-6-8.4 Distinguishing fact from opinion, and identifying possible bias/propaganda
R-6-8.5 Making inferences about causes or effects
Writing NECAP GLE Standards:
W-6-2.2 Summarizing key ideas
W-6-2.3 Connecting what has been read (plot/ideas/concepts) to prior knowledge or other texts, by referring to relevant ideas
W-6-3.1 Stating and maintaining a focus (purpose), a firm judgment, or point of view when responding to a given question
W-6-3.3 Using specific details and references to text or relevant citations to support focus or judgment
W-6-8.3 Including sufficient details or facts for appropriate depth of information: naming, describing, explaining, comparing, use of visual images
W-6-8.4 Addressing readers' concerns (including counterarguments - in persuasive writing; addressing potential problems -in procedures; providing context -in reports)
W-6-9.1 Applying rules of standard English usage to correct grammatical errors
W-6-9.2 Applying basic capitalization rules
W-6-9.4 Using punctuation to clarify meaning
Science NECAP GLE Standards:
ESS1 (5-6)–3Students demonstrate an understanding of processes and change over time within earth systems by …3a describing events and the effect they may have on climate (e.g. El Nino, deforestation, glacial melting, and an increase in greenhouse gases).
ESS1 (7-8)–4 Students demonstrate an understanding of processes and change over time within earth systems by …
4b using evidence to make inferences or predictions about global climate issues.
Technology NECAP GLE Standards: (Draft January 2007)
ET1.1 (5-6) Students demonstrate an understanding of the impact of technology
RIEMA RI Standards for information literacy
Standard 1: The student who is information literate accesses information efficiently and effectively.
Rhode Island Standard 2: Students will demonstrate information-seeking strategies to identify, locate, access and retrieve information in all formats.
Rhode Island Standard 3: Students will demonstrate an ability to synthesize and analyze information in all formats.
Standard 2: The student who is information literate evaluates information critically and competently.
Rhode Island Standard 4: Students will demonstrate an ability to organize and evaluate information in all formats.
Standard 3: The student who is information literate uses information accurately and creatively.
Rhode Island Standard 5: Students will demonstrate an ability to communicate ideas and information through the use of various media.

Lesson 1: Introduction to global warming; Students will be introduced to the topic of global warming by starting the lesson with a whole group activity. The teacher will write out on an overhead the format for a KWL chart. Teacher will then have students create their own KWL chart in their notebooks. The children will be instructed to fill in as much of the K and W parts of their charts as possible. Once children are nearly complete, the teacher will ask for volunteers to add what they have to the classroom chart. Once chart is complete, teacher will put the following website on the projector and use the following information as a read aloud. http://science.nationalgeographic.com/science/environment/global-warming/gw-overview.html
After the read aloud teacher will have students add to their L section in their charts, but remind them that this area is far from complete. Students will be asked to revisit their chart throughout the unit.
Goals: At the culmination of this lesson, students will have explored their prior knowledge of global warming, along with creating a KWL chart containing new information acquired through the read aloud.
Assessment: Student will be assessed by the teacher on the student checklist. (See end of lesson for checklist and detailed description of daily lesson assessment.)
Lesson 2 : Word Work; Students will be given a list of vocabulary words for the unit. Each word will be written into their science glossary section. The word will be defined when it appears on an assignment or during a reading. The teacher will model the desired work by selecting 10 words for the students to add to their glossaries that day. Methods of defining the words will be modeled. Using context clues, a dictionary, text features, Wikipedia, and dictionary.com will all be used as ways to find 5 appropriate vocabulary definitions. Students will then have to find the remaining definitions using the lesson taught as a guideline. The student will also write a paragraph describing his/her favorite method, reasons for their choice, and possible drawbacks.
Goals: At the culmination of this lesson, students will have experimented with different methods of finding the definition of vocabulary words. Students will have created a glossary and written a paragraph describing their favorite method.
Assessment: Student will be assessed by the teacher on the student checklist. (See end of lesson for checklist and detailed description of daily lesson assessment.)

Lesson 3: Student Research lesson: Students will be reintroduced to global warming by completing research. Students will be guided through the following sites and various features of the sites will be discussed.
http://www.edf.org/home.cfm Environmental Def Fund
http://www.epa.gov/climatechange/science/index.html US Environmental Protection Agency
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Global_warming Wikipedia Global Warming
http://www.nwf.org/globalwarming/?&s_src=GoogleAdwords National Wildlife Federation. A great collection of videos, documents, blogs, and even wikis
Students will go home and use any of the following sites to find one discussed cause for global warming. Students will then give the following information: How is this problem helping cause global warming? What is creating this effect? Is it natural or created by humans or both? On a scale of 1 to 10 (1 not much-10 major effect), how much do you think your cause is involved in overall global warming? Why?
(I have already established a classroom blog and wiki. These issues are assumed for the next lessons. It is also assumed that the teacher has a projector attached to his/her computer. I have and use these tools daily in my classroom)
Goals: At the culmination of this lesson, students will have found a cause for global warming and started to gather conclusions about the facts surrounding their collected information
Assessment: Student will be assessed by the teacher on the student checklist. (See end of lesson for checklist and detailed description of daily lesson assessment.)

Lesson 4; Introduction to Wiki: Student will watch a short video http://www.commoncraft.com/video-wikis-plain-english (3:52). After watching the video, teacher will facilitate a discussion on usefulness of wikis and ways that a wiki may be used in the classroom. Teacher will open the classroom blog and from there click on the link for the classroom wiki. Once at wikispaces, the teacher will show how to edit and save on the wiki. The teacher will then add the following titles to the wiki; Global Warming Cause. Global Warming effect. Students will be assigned the task of adding the cause and effect to the class wiki from their previous night’s homework.
Goals: At the culmination of this lesson, students will have learned how to add content to the class wiki.
Assessment: Student will be assessed by the teacher on the student checklist. (See end of lesson for checklist and detailed description of daily lesson assessment.)

Lesson 5; Class web : Teacher will revisit the classroom wiki and show children the progress that was made. Teacher will emphasize how much time and effort this task would have taken if the assignment was completed through email or other means. Teacher will then review the entries left on the wiki and create a class web on chart paper based on the information students left for homework. The web will contain the word global warming in the middle. All of the causes will then be filled in the circles coming from global warming. Teacher will assign the following for homework; Students will add effects circles onto the causes circles already created for the class web.
Example: PDF file
Goals: At the culmination of this lesson, students will have learned the benefits to working on a wiki, and deepened their understanding of the causes and effects of global warming.
Assessment: Student will be assessed by the teacher on the student checklist. (See end of lesson for checklist and detailed description of daily lesson assessment.)

Lesson 6; Research Part II: Students will visit the following sites in pairs looking for more information to add to their webs. The classroom has access to 10 wireless laptops that will be used for this lesson. Students will be given the appropriate sites to expedite the process in class. http://www.ecobridge.org/content/g_cse.htm List of causes of global Warming http://www.ecobridge.org/content/g_cse.htm Threat of Climate Change. What could happen if (Effects)
Students will also access the classroom wiki during this time to add more causes and effects to the list.
Goals: At the culmination of this lesson, students will have deciphered important research information, and yet again deepened their knowledge of global warming and its causes and effects.
Assessment: Student will be assessed by the teacher on the student checklist. (See end of lesson for checklist and detailed description of daily lesson assessment.)

Lesson 7;Effects of Global Warming on Wildlife: Teacher will discuss yesterday’s findings in whole group. Class will then watch a short video to reinforce and add to the effects/possible effects of global warming. http://www.nwf.org/wildlifeandglobalwarming/globalwarmingandwildlife.cfm (Effects on Habit from global warming video). Students will see for themselves the alarming trends and the impact that global warming has. Students will write a one page paper (5-8 paragraphs) summarizing the effects of global warming. Students will also be instructed to add content to their webs and KWL charts.
Goals: At the culmination of this lesson, students will have learned about the impact of global warming on wildlife. The students would have also created a one page paper summarizing what they have learned through lesson 7.
Assessment: Student will be assessed by the teacher on the student checklist. (See end of lesson for checklist and detailed description of daily lesson assessment.)

Lesson 8; Greenhouse Gasses: The teacher will revisit the site http://www.ecobridge.org/content/g_cse.htm List of causes of global Warming. Teacher will create a chart with the greenhouse gasses listed. Carbon Dioxide, Methane, Nitrous Oxide, and water vapor. Students will then fill in the other side of the chart will the objects that cause those gasses. It will be clear to see that most of the problem is the gas carbon dioxide. Students will then be asked to create a list of 10 things that they or their family can do to reduce the amount of carbon dioxide that is created. Students will review their list and add any missing parts to the class wiki. Each student is required to add at least one thing that they can do to the class wiki. The wiki page should contain both the idea and student name.
Goals: At the culmination of this lesson, students will have explored greenhouse gasses and effects on the planet. Students will also add information to the class wiki.
Assessment: Student will be assessed by the teacher on the student checklist. (See end of lesson for checklist and detailed description of daily lesson assessment.)

Lesson 9; Point of view (Feature Articles): Lesson will focus on feature articles and point of view. Teacher will begin the lesson with 2 short read alouds. Both articles will be shown on the smartboard with the projector so that students will be able to notice the text features. Both of the texts are articles and emphasis will be directed to text features and point of view.
http://www.sciencedaily.com/articles/a/antarctic_ice_sheet.htm Science Reference, Antarctic ice sheet
http://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,1176980,00.html TIME Magazine article
Following the read aloud, there will be a whole group discussion on text features and point of view. Students will be asked;
• How does an article differ from other text you may read?
• What things should you look for when you are reading an article like the ones today?
• Is there another type of text that is similar to what I read to you today?
Students will then be asked to consider the author’s point of view. Does the point of view matter? Once that question is asked, play the video commercial http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0bcRgnIcntI Coal , America’s Power. Once the video is completed, ask the question again. Students will complete the following question for homework. Who is the better baseball team? The Yankees or the Red Sox? Students will post their responses on the classroom blog (www.rfkfamily.blogspot.com) This will lead the discussion for tomorrow’s lesson.
Goals: At the culmination of this lesson, students will have been exposed to more persuasive text, and shown an example of persuasive video. Both media will be student options for the final project. Students will also answer a question regarding opinion that will lead into tomorrow’s discussion.
Assessment: Student will be assessed by the teacher on the student checklist. (See end of lesson for checklist and detailed description of daily lesson assessment.)

Lesson 10; Writing persuasive piece lesson1: Teacher led discussion will start with yesterday’s question. Who is better? The Yankees or the Red Sox? Ask for student responses. After everyone airs their opinion, tell them that this is what point of view is all about. People think that what they believe is right. How do we try to convince others of our opinion? Yesterday, we watched a commercial about coal. It sounded pretty good. What point of view did the commercial take? Who do you think created that commercial? How did they try to convince you ? What about the opposing position? Well here is a site that I would consider the opposing view. http://www.sciencealert.com.au/opinions/20080205-17265-2.html Letter to Kevin Rudd- Stop coal plants now. Display this site on the smartboard and use it as today’s read aloud. This is a letter to the Prime Minister of Australia. Two very different points of view. What makes someone believe your point of view? How do we convince people? Facts, Facts, Facts. Students will choose one topic from this unit that they think is important to address. (After classroom lessons focusing on persuasive arguments, the student will try to convince the Governor of the importance of their point and ways to slow of reverse its effect.)
For the following final writing piece, it is assumed that students already have prior knowledge using the classroom blog. They would have been using it since the start of school to post their weekly writing lesson from Reading Street (Pearson).
Goals: At the culmination of this lesson, students will have learned more about persuasive writing. Students will also have chosen a topic regarding global warming that they would like to create a persuasive argument for.
Assessment: Student will be assessed by the teacher on the student checklist. (See end of lesson for checklist and detailed description of daily lesson assessment.)

Lesson 11; Persuasive Piece Lesson 2 Day 1: Teacher-“Yesterday you had to decide on a topic regarding global warming that you thought was important. Your assignment is to convince the Governor of your opinion and offer actions that can slow or reverse the effect.” The teacher will then make a list on chart paper containing students and their choices. This list, while being compiled will be screened for appropriate and desired topics.
The teacher will then pass out the rubric for the persuasive argument. While reviewing the rubric with the children, the teacher will point out that students will have the freedom to use any form of persuasion. Students will have the option of creating pieces such as a magazine or newspaper article, a persuasive letter, a written persuasive argument in traditional form, video collection with text, an oral persuasion, or create their own wiki space or blog. Students can use any form that interests them. Students will complete an outline of their proposal and explanation of the media type used. Students will also begin to gather information on their topic.
Goals: At the culmination of this lesson, students will have researched their topic, chosen a type of media to use, and complete an outline of proposed media type to be used.
Assessment: Student will be assessed by the teacher on the student checklist. (See end of lesson for checklist and detailed description of daily lesson assessment.)

Lesson 12; Persuasive Piece Lesson 2 Day 2: Students will work on their projects in class. During this time, students who chose to write a piece will be grouped together. Students who chose to use a web based technology will be grouped together with the 10 laptops. During this time the teacher will circulate around the room offering help and guidance to the class. Teacher focus should be on student engagement, collection of facts, and guidelines set by the persuasive rubric. Students will work on their projects for homework and write one paragraph regarding any problems that they are encountering. The one paragraph will be added to the classroom blog. The teacher will read the classroom blog that night in preparation of tomorrow’s lesson.
Goals: At the culmination of this lesson, students will have started creating their piece, and students also had to write one paragraph regarding an area they feel is troublesome for them.
Assessment: Student will be assessed by the teacher on the student checklist. (See end of lesson for checklist and detailed description of daily lesson assessment.)

Lesson 13; Persuasive Piece Lesson 2 Day 3: The students will work on their projects again in class. During this time teachers will review individual progress and mark student results on the grade checklist. Students should have collected data, created most of their persuasive argument piece, and should be nearly ready to publish by the end of the class period. Students will be required to finish their persuasive argument for homework. All student work will need to be posted on some form of web based platform. Whether it is an article on the classroom blog, or a student created blog, all final pieces must be completed in electronic form.
Goals: At the culmination of this lesson, students will have published their persuasive argument.
Assessment: Student will be assessed by the teacher on the student checklist. (See end of lesson for checklist and detailed description of daily lesson assessment.)

Lesson 14; Persuasive Piece Peer Review: Over the course of the next two days, the class will view the work of their peers offering insight and comments regarding individual pieces. Students will discuss effectiveness of the piece in terms of persuading the audience. Students will use a teacher created checklist for each piece and give each student a grade based on the scoring rubric. The student grading will be counted as part of each student’s final grade as laid out in the project rubric.
Goals: At the culmination of this lesson, students will have peer reviewed each other’s work, and scored peer pieces.
Assessment: Student will be assessed by the teacher on the student checklist. (See end of lesson for checklist and detailed description of daily lesson assessment.)

Lesson 15; Culminating activity: Teacher will play the DVD An Inconvenient Truth, narrated by Al Gore. This video not only ties in all of the previous research, it’s also a very powerful form of media. Students will comment on the film by writing a one page summary and posting a minimum of a 2 paragraph opinion on the classroom blog. www.rfkfamily.blogspot.com
Goals: At the culmination of this lesson, students will have learned about the causes of global warming and things that can be done to stop or slow the continued demise of our global ecosystems. Students will have also written a one page summary and a 2 paragraph opinion to be posted on the blog.
Assessment: Student will be assessed by the teacher on the student checklist. (See end of lesson for checklist and detailed description of daily lesson assessment.)

Student Assessment
Student Checklist:
Students will be graded daily on the areas indicated in the chart below. Students will be graded on either a STUDENT WORK PIECE or TEACHER OBSERVED BEHAVIOR. These two types of grading will be scored by the following
• Student Work Piece:
4- Student follows all directions and completes the assignment. Student goes above and beyond the teacher requirements.
3- Student follows all directions and completes the assignment in an acceptable manner.
2- Student generally follows directions, but may have missed a part of the required procedure. May lack effort and quality
1- Student didn’t follow directions. Missed too many aspects of the assignment to show acquisition of desired skill. Lacks effort and is poor in quality
• Teacher Observed Behavior:
4- Student follows classroom procedure and is an active participant. Student may be seen taking the assignment further, helping others, and can be observed learning above and beyond the lesson guidelines.
3. Student follows classroom procedure and is an active participant. Student is self directed and motivated.
2. Student occasionally strays from classroom procedure and rarely participates in classroom guided discussion. Students is occasionally motivated but is easily distracted form tasks. Doesn’t get desired amount of work done in allotted time.
1- Student is often off task and doesn’t participate within the classroom, guidelines. Isn’t motivated and may be a large distraction to him/her self and others.



The Persuasive Argument piece along with the unit work checklist will be the main two assessments during this unit. Student unit test and quizzes are other accommodations that may be used to help assess this unit. I have decided to move away from these traditional methods of assessment and utilize different measures of student achievement for this unit.

USEFUL SITES
http://www.edf.org/home.cfm Environmental Defense Fund
http://www.epa.gov/climatechange/science/index.html US Environmental Protection Agency
http://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,1176980,00.html TIME Magazine article
http://www.climatehotmap.org/namerica.html Global Warming: Early Warning signs
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Global_warming Wikipedia Global Warming
http://www.nwf.org/globalwarming/?&s_src=GoogleAdwords National Wildlife Federation. A great collection of videos, documents, blogs, and even wikis
http://climatechallenge.org Site has local Group finders, flicker, You Tube videos, and common blogs
http://www.boston.com/news/science/articles/2006/01/30/scientists_debate_human_effect_on_global_warming/ Scientists debate human effect on global warming ‘Tipping point’ raises concern 2006
http://www.sierraclub.org/energy/health/ Sierra Club “ Global Warming Impacts: Health Effects
http://www.sierraclub.org/energy/overview/
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0bcRgnIcntI Coal , America’s Power.
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/c/a/2007/04/17/MNGFCP9UL41.DTL Global warming health effects Smog, heat waves may contribute to big rise in illness
http://www.sciencealert.com.au/opinions/20080205-17265-2.html Letter to Kevin Rudd- Stop coal plants now.
http://www.ecobridge.org/content/g_cse.htm List of causes (manmade) of global Warming
http://www.ecobridge.org/content/g_cse.htm Threat of Climate Change. What could happen if:
"Global warming is real; the risks it poses are real; and the American people have a right to know it and a responsibility to do something about it. The sooner Congress understands that, the sooner we can protect our nation--and our planet--from increased flood, fire, drought, and deadly heat waves." President Bill Clinton, July 25, 1998. (Quotation from transcript of President Clinton’s radio address of July 25, 1998)
http://www.nwf.org/wildlifeandglobalwarming/globalwarmingandwildlife.cfm Effects on Habit from global warming video.
http://www.sciencedaily.com/articles/a/antarctic_ice_sheet.htm Science Reference, Antarctic ice sheet

Mrs. Z. said...

Stephanie M. Zannella
English/LA
Blue Team - 8th Grade
Cole Middle School, East Greenwich, RI

Final Project – Unit

Background: As part of an interdisciplinary united called “Perspectives,” our team has developed this unit to study the events of World War II (specifically the Pacific Theatre and the dropping of the atomic bomb on Hiroshima) as well as Japanese internment. Our goal is for students to develop an understanding of the perspectives of some of the key people living during this time period and make parallels to current events. We hope to address statements such as “Just nuke ‘em” and really examine what that means. Topics to be covered in each discipline are as follows:

Social Studies – the key events and people during World War II.

English – Farewell to Manzanar by Jeanne Wakatsuki-Houston and James D. Houston. Jeanne Wakatsuki was seven years old when her family was put in an internment camp. Farewell to Manzanar is her memoir.

Science – the science and scientists behind the bomb and the Manhattan Project.

Math – some math classes will be studying cryptology.

In the past, our culminating project took the form of an actual “book” that students put together using drawings, pictures, etc. While some students enjoyed this type of work and produced spectacular projects, for other students it was drudgery—not to mention the amount of money some students spent on special paper, scrap booking materials, etc. Also, when the projects were done, a select few were kept as models for the next year, and the rest of them were just thrown away. In an effort to create student interest, differentiate, and allow for a bigger audience, I have decided to modify the unit to use the technology and Web 2.0 tools we learned about in this class.



Lessons/Activities
As the English teacher on the team, the lessons/activities covered here will relate to English/Language Arts class.

Lesson 1 – Using the Class Blog

As students are reading Farewell to Manzanar, we will use a class blog to have a literature circle/book club type discussion.

1. Each student will be responsible for posting five (5) discussion questions for the class on our class blog for one chapter, which will be assigned by me.

2. The other students will be responsible for responding to at least one of the discussion questions making connections and predictions. These will be graded as homework assignments.

3. Five of the responses (over the course of the book) will be counted as a quiz grade. These should be more thorough, analytical, and be answered in a quote sandwich format.

4. As an extension, you may visit the other classes’ blogs and respond to questions that have been posed by other team mates.

Please refer to the rubric that follows for the quiz-grade responses.

4 3 2 1
Content Student shows critical thinking and skillfully answers the question (one or more paragraphs) using a quote sandwich format; quote selected is well-chosen and supports opinion completely. Student shows critical thinking and answers question thoroughly (one paragraph) using a quote sandwich format; quote selected is relevant and supports student’s opinion appropriately. Student answers the question using a quote to support opinion but may not sandwich quote or quote does not effectively support claim. Student answers the question but does not use a quote to support opinion. Response may be too brief.
Grammar/
Conventions Shows an excellent understanding of grammar, spelling and punctuation rules; minor errors. Shows good understanding of grammar, spelling and punctuation rules; few proofreading errors. Shows an understanding of grammar, spelling and punctuation rules; several proofreading errors. Shows little understanding of grammar, spelling and punctuation rules; errors interfere with understanding.
In response to literary or informational text, students make and support analytical judgments about text by…
• W–8–3.1 Stating and maintaining a focus (purpose), a firm judgment, or point of view when responding to a given question (Local)
• W–8–3.2 Making inferences about the relationship(s) among content, events, characters, setting, theme, or author’s craft (Local)
• W–8–11.2 Sharing thoughts, observations, or impressions (Local)
Lesson 2 – Using the Blog – Once students in each class complete their designated class activity (below), they will share reactions with groups from another class that have completed the same activity. The secretary for the group will be responsible for posting the group’s reaction on the class blog, while the other group members are responsible for reacting to the other class’ responses. This will count as a class work grade. (50 points)

Note: The poetry group will have the option of posting an audio response. (See below.)

Differentiated group work – focusing on Perspective
Some of these activities were taken from the following site:
http://www.nps.gov/archive/manz/ed_child_prison_camp.htm

In this lesson, students work in groups (4-5 students) of their choice to examine poetry, war diaries, photographs/artwork, and the article The Stolen Years by Tom Griffin that appeared in the University of Washington’s alumni magazine – Columns.

1. Poetry. One group will read poetry by adults and children who lived in concentration and internment camps during World War II. They will complete the following sheet, comparing and contrasting the poems focusing on subject matter, tone, and mood and how each poem differs based on the perspective of the speaker. (To save space I have not included the poems, but I can provide them for anyone interested.)

***Rather than posting written responses to the blog, this group will have the option of creating an audio recording. Students will record their readings of poems from adults and children in concentration camps and adults and children in internment camps. They will then record their reactions to these poems.

We will use http://www.evoca.com to record the audio. Our librarian currently uses this service to record reviews of books and uploads them to our reading challenge list. Since I have not yet tried podcasting/or uploading audio, I would like to use this service because she can help me with it. However, if students are familiar with the technology and want to use their I-pods to record the audio, they can do this.


Blue Team – Perspectives Unit

Comparing/Contrasting Poetry
Group Members:
__________________________________ _______________________________
__________________________________ _______________________________

In this activity, you and your group members will be reading various pieces of poetry. These poems were written by both children and adults—some living in internment camps, and some living in concentration camps or ghettos in Europe.

1. Compare a poem written by an adult in a concentration camp to a child in a concentration camp.

What would you say the tone (speaker’s attitude toward the work) is in each of these poems? Why?

Adult:


Child:

What is the mood? (feeling you get from the poem) Why? What specific words or images make you feel this way?
2. Compare a poem written by an adult in an internment camp to a child in an internment camp.

What would you say the tone (speaker’s attitude toward the work) is in each of these poems? Why?

Adult:


Child:

What is the mood? (feeling you get from the poem) Why? What specific words or images make you feel this way?

Adult:


Child:




3. Now compare an adult in a concentration camp with an adult in an internment camp.

Are their experiences similar? Is the tone and mood of the poems similar or different?



What specific words or phrases can you point to support your opinions?


4. Lastly, compare a child’s poem from each.


Are their experiences similar? Is the tone and mood of the poems similar or different?



What specific words or phrases can you point to support your opinions?
Any other comments?
2. War Diaries. Students will look at excerpts from the following:
a. The Diary of Anne Frank
b. Zlata’s Diary (a child in war-torn Sarajevo)
c. A diary of a young girl living in an internment camp in Vancouver, British Columbia

Students in this group will read all three diary excerpts and fill in the following matrix. (In interest of space, I have not included the diaries here, but they can be found at:

War Diaries Worksheet


For Secondary LESSON PLAN: War Diaries
Questions for Thought and Discussion Shizuye Takashima
A Child in Prison Camp
Anne Frank
The Diary of a Young Girl
Zlata Filipovic
A Child's Life in Sarajevo

1. At the beginning of each excerpt, what were the things each author was concerned about? What were some of the normal concerns for a girl of her age?
2. What are some of the observations that each young woman made about the prejudice directed
against her people? Against her father?
3. What new piece or pieces of information did you learn about each of the wars that
affected the young authors?
4. What question(s) do you have about the girls, their families,
or their countries' wars as a result of reading their diaries?
Return to Lesson Plans page



3. Artwork/Photographs: This group will compare and contrast photographs and other artwork by answering the following questions.

Photos/artwork can be found at:



Blue Team – Perspectives Unit
Group Members:
_______________________________ _________________________________
_______________________________ _________________________________

“Portrait of Internment”

In this activity, you and your group members will be studying artwork. After looking at the various pieces, answer the questions that follow through your discussion. Because art affects us at an emotional level, you may also add any other thoughts, feelings, or comments you desire about the artwork and/or photographs.

Images 1, 2, and 3:

Children tagged like packages to be sent to the assembly centers.

1. Comment on the differences between a photograph and a painting.
What does the photograph capture? What does the artist capture in the painting?




What is included in the photograph and excluded in the painting?



What do the expressions of the children tell you?



What is added to each one?



How do these changes affect the viewer?



Which is more subjective? Objective? Which is more truthful? Why?


Images 4 & 5:

A baseball game at a relocation center. Ansel Adams was invited in fall 1943 by Ralph Merritt (camp director) to photograph Manzanar.

1. Why do you notice about the photograph? (Hint: is anything missing?)



2. What purpose does the photograph serve?




3. What is the tone of the painting?




4. Which image is more truthful?



Images 6 & 7: When looking at these two pieces, discuss symbolism.

1. What does the kite represent?


2. The barbed wire?


3. The broken fence in today’s picture?


4. What conclusions can be drawn about the lives of these children in the camp?


Images 8, 9, & 10:
Discuss the power of art to represent historical events. After looking at these three pieces of public art, which do you think is most effective? Why?

Which is the most hopeful?
5. Students will answer the following questions after reading “The Stolen Years” by Tom Griffin. This article was taken from the March, 2006 edition of the University of Washington Alumni Magazine Columns.

Students will answer the following questions.


Blue Team Date:___________________
Group Members:____________________________ ____________________________
____________________________ ____________________________
“The Stolen Years”
This article deals with University of Washington students who were forced to leave the university and go to internment camps during World War II because of their Japanese descent. Read the article and respond accordingly to the following.

1. Who was Gordon Hirabayashi?



2. Respond to the following quote:
“Progress is made by evolution, not revolution.”



3. Who was Lee Paul Sieg? What was his opinion on the internment?



4. What did the university try to do to keep students in school?



5. Respond to the following quote:
“These people you condemn, gentlemen, are human beings—individual citizens who work and dream as you and I. They are not cattle. And they are not to be herded as cattle. They are human Citizens. They speak our tongue. They worship our way of life. They are us.” Define “us.”



6. Which institutions were most welcoming to the displaced Japanese students?

7. What was Hirabayashi’s strongest argument for not obeying the curfew or reporting to the camps?



8. Who was Miyamoto? How did he approach the internment?



9. While Hirabayashi was in jail, he received a letter from a soldier who said, “I’m out here fighting, and that’s one of the things I’m for.” What is he fighting for?



10. When Hirabayashi was on trial, what instructions did the judge give the jury that resulted in a guilty verdict?

11. Who are some of the other Japanese-American citizens mentioned in the article? What was their involvement?



12. Respond to the following. “Distinctions between citizens solely because of their ancestry are by their very nature odious to a free people…[but] it by no means follows that, in dealing with the perils of war, Congress and the Executive are wholly precluded from taking into account those facts and circumstances which are relevant to measures for our national defense.”

13. Do you agree with this statement? Why or why not?



14. Under which president did the Japanese internees receive compensation for their losses?
How much?


15. The article states that Roosevelt’s advisers realized the camps were a mistake. However, since it was an election year, Roosevelt decided to wait until after the vote (for president) to lift the military orders. Why would an election year have to do with it? What does this reveal about the popular opinion?




16. Comment on the following quote by Ruby Inouye Shu. “If I had not been evacuated, I don’t know if I would have followed through on becoming a doctor. The chances would not be as great, and my intention would not be as firm.” What does she mean by this?



17. Comment on the following quote by Hiro Nishamura. “This is still the best country in the world and the best democracy.” Does this hold true in the year 2007? Do you agree? Why or why not?




18. Professor Miyamoto states, “They (students, Nisei) were young and adaptable. But their parents lost almost everything.” What example can you provide to prove this? (not in this article)




19. Lastly, re-read the last paragraph of this article. Why do you think the U.S. has the “capacity for change in another direction”? Given your knowledge about the internment and U.S. practices around the world, do you agree that the U.S. is still the greatest nation in the world? Why? or Why not?


W–8–3
In response to literary or informational text, students make and support analytical judgments about text by…
• W–8–3.1 Stating and maintaining a focus (purpose), a firm judgment, or point of view when responding to a given question (Local)
• W–8–3.2 Making inferences about the relationship(s) among content, events, characters, setting, theme, or author’s craft (Local)

• W–8–3.3 Using specific details and references to text or relevant citations to support focus or judgment (Local)
• W–8–11.2 Sharing thoughts, observations, or impressions (Local)
Lesson 3 - Using Individual Blogs
As part of our class, students will create a personal blog to post their writing assignments for the class. This blog will act as an on-line portfolio. For this assignment, each student will be responsible for choosing one of the options below and posting it to his or her blog. They will also be required to respond to three other students’ postings (one in each of the other classes).

Blue Team – Mrs. Zannella – RAFT Assignment – Writing from another perspective.
Task: Now that you have had the opportunity to read and discuss many different ideas and perspectives, your job is to pick one of the following and write in the format noted. You will be required to print out or hand write a rough draft and bring it to class for peer editing. See the attached peer editing sheet. Once you have peer-edited, you will post your final piece to your blog for comment.

Extension: Write back to yourself from the point of view of the audience.


Role Audience Format Topic Strong Verb
Japanese Teen in internment camp American Friend back “home” Personal Letter What it’s like and what you miss most Describe
Japanese Adult
(maybe Ko W.) in internment camp President Roosevelt Formal Letter Why Japanese people should not be interned Persuade
Japanese person interned Future grandchild A journal describing “a week in the life” at camp. What camp is like and what you hope the future will be like for him or her. Describe

Milton Eisenhower,
Director of the War Re-location Authority Japanese people in United States Announcement The Camps/Internment
Answer the 4Ws + the How Inform
Japanese mother or father Self and possible future generations Diary entries
(1-2 weeks) How they have made the best of the situation—what they have done to keep their culture. Describe
If you would rather create your own Role or Topic, you may do so with my approval.

Notes: Final piece should be typed 1-2 pages. 12-point font. Single-spaced since that makes most sense for the formats listed. Double-space between paragraphs.

GLEs Addressed:
• W-8-4.2 – Establishing context, character, motivation, problem/conflict/challenge and resolution, and maintaining point of view.
• W-8-7.2 maintaining focus, controlling idea, or thesis.
• W-8-7.3 writing with a sense of audience
• W-8-8.4 for persuasive writing…addressing counter-arguments
• W-8-5.1 creating images and using details and sensory language
• W-8-10 writing, drafting, revising…
• W–8–11.2 Sharing thoughts, observations, or impressions (Local)

Mrs. Zannella – Blue Team

Peer Editing – RAFTS (in class)
Focus: IDEAS

1. Does the author have all the elements of their RAFT?
R –
A –
F –
T –

2. Summarize: What is the author’s purpose for writing?
_______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________.

3. Now, go back and re-read. Underline important details in red, and those that could be left out in blue (if any).

4. Why did you use blue? Why should this detail(s) be eliminated?

_______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________.

5. Did the author show rather than tell?
If the author stated, “This camp is horrible.” Did he/she show why? Underline descriptors in green.

6. What effect does this piece have on you?
-Convinced?
-More knowledgeable?
-Emotions? Anger, sadness…
-Could you see images in your head?

What specific details caused you to feel this way? _______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________.

7. Indifferent? Why? What could be improved?
______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ _______________________________.




ORGANIZE YOUR IDEAS
GOVERNMENT ANNOUNCEMENT


WHO is being informed?


WHAT are you telling them?


WHEN will the event occur?

WHERE will the events take place? WHERE will they go? And HOW?


WHY??? This is the biggie…why is this being done?






Rubric:

For this assignment the focus will be ideas and voice. This will count for a 50-point quiz grade.


Ideas
Establishes and maintains a theme or focus that influences the reader’s thinking. 2.7.3

Creates a world that enables the reader to experience the story or event through description and details. 2.4.6

Skillfully establishes setting (time and place) by using sensory imagery and descriptive language. 2.8.2

Establishes context and character motivation while maintaining a point of view. 2.7.2

Skillfully develops static/flat and dynamic/round characters through dialogue, actions, behavior or relationships with other characters. (If applicable)
Establishes and maintains a theme or focus. 2.7.3


Creates a world that enables the reader to imagine through description and details. 2.4.6

Establishes setting (time and place) by using sensory imagery and descriptive language. 2.8.2


Establishes context and character motivation while maintaining a point of view. 2.7.2

Develops static/flat and dynamic/round characters through dialogue, actions, behavior or relationships with other characters (if applicable). 2.8.3
Attempts to establish and maintain a theme or focus. 2.7.3


Tries to create a world using limited description and details. 2.4.6


Attempts to establish setting (time and place) by using sensory imagery and/or descriptive language. 2.8.2


Attempts to establish context and character motivation while maintaining a point of view. 2.7.2

Attempts to develop static/flat and/or dynamic/round characters through dialogue, actions, behavior or relationships with other characters (if applicable). 2.8.3
Does not establish and maintain a theme or focus. 2.7.3


Includes minimal description and details. 2.4.6



Attempts to establish setting (time and place) but lacks sensory imagery and/or descriptive language. 2.8.2


Neglects to establish context and character motivation. 2.7.2


Develops only static/flat characters through dialogue, actions, behavior or relationships with other characters. 2.8.3
(if applicable)


Voice
Uses a sophisticated narrative or authoritative voice and point of view appropriate to audience. 2.8.5

Conveys clear identity of narrator through tone, mood, and emotion; language used creates an emotion
Uses narrative or authoritative voice and point of view appropriate to audience. 2.8.5


Conveys clear identity of narrator through tone, mood, and emotion.

Attempts to use narrative or authoritative voice and/or point of view appropriate to audience. 2.8.5

Lacks tone, mood, or emotion; narrator is underdeveloped.

Lacks narrator’s point of view. 2.8.5



Lacks tone, mood, and emotion; narrator is flat/boring/underdeveloped.


Although these two traits will be our focus, grammar, usage, and spelling will be taken into account as well and be graded on a 4, 3, 2, 1 scale.



Lesson 4 - Using Wikispaces

For this lesson, students will work with a partner to create a study guide for assigned chapters in Farewell to Manzanar. They will create a collaborative document meeting the criteria listed below. Other students will be able to use these guides to study for the quizzes/tests. By using the wikispace, students will be able to work on the study guide from home editing and adding work accordingly. This will count as a 40 point quiz grade.

Farewell To Manzanar Study Guide Assignment:

1. Setting: Include time and place. Be mindful of the different time periods and settings that Jeanne mentions. (5 points)

2. Characters: What characters appear in the chapters? Include a brief description and provide an example that illustrates a particular characteristic. (10 points)

3. Key Points / Conflict: Identify the key points of the chapters and explain any conflicts. Conflict types include character vs. character, character vs. nature, character vs. self, and character vs. society. (10 points)

4. Three (3) questions for discussion. (5 points)

5. Choose 5 - 6 important quotes and explain their relevance. Remember to include author and page number. Cite the quotes properly. (10 points)

6. Extension: Any other useful information you feel should be included. You may want to include literary devices and/or figurative language used and how these techniques enhance meaning.

You may also add a vocabulary page for your chapters. Use the words from your folder and five additional words from the chapter that may be unknown to your or other students.

Please click on the appropriate chapter page on your classes’ wikispace to add your information. I have included your names on the pages already in case you forget your assigned chapter. I have also included these specifications on the main page. Study guides are due two days before the quiz or test that covers those chapters.

GLEs Addressed:

R-8-5: Analyze and interpret elements of literary texts, citing evidence where appropriate by:
R-8-5.1 Explaining or supporting logical predictions (Local)
R-8-5.2 Describing characterization (e.g. stereotype, antagonist, protagonist), motivation, or interactions, citing thoughts, words, or actions that reveal characters’ traits, motivations, or their changes over time.
R-8-5.3 Making inferences about cause/effect, internal or external conflicts (e.g., person versus self, person versus person, person versus nature/society/fate), or the relationship among elements within text (e.g., describing the interaction among plot/subplots)
R–8–5.3 Making inferences about cause/effect, internal or external conflicts (e.g., person versus self, person versus person, person versus nature/society/fate), or the relationship among elements within text (e.g., describing the interaction among plot/subplots)
R-8-6.1: Demonstrating knowledge of author’s style or use of literary elements and devices (e.g., imagery, repetition, flashback, foreshadowing, personification, hyperbole, symbolism, or use of punctuation) to analyze literary works (Local)








Lesson 5 - Using the Wiki– Research assignment.

For this assignment, students will work in groups of four to research one of the internment camps (other than Manzanar) and post pertinent information about the camp. As a collaborative document, students can edit and add to each other’s information. Additionally, students will be required to add at least four (4) hyperlinks to their page that provide the reader with additional information. For example, a “Pearl Harbor” hyperlink would take the reader to an informational page on Pearl Harbor. This could be a page you create or one that already exists. Refer to the graphic organizer and rubric below for the components required. This will count as a test grade.

Differentiation: Students will be grouped heterogeneously so that more able students can help and model for those who may not have the same grasp of the information or technology.

Extension: Add additional hyperlinks for maximum information.

Graphic Organizer:

Who? Who was sent to these camps? Be specific. Don’t just say Japanese people. Rather, state: All Japanese citizens and non-citizens living on the West Coast…
What? What were the camps like? How many people were interned there?
When? When was this done?
Where? Where was the camp?
Why? What were the reasons for internment given by the U.S. Government?
How? How was the internment carried out? How were the Japanese informed? How did they get to the camps?

Research Report : Internment Camp

CATEGORY 4 3 2 1
Organization Information is very organized with well-constructed paragraphs and subheadings. Information is organized with well-constructed paragraphs. Information is organized, but paragraphs are not well-constructed. The information appears to be disorganized.
Amount of Information All topics are addressed and all questions answered completely and thoroughly. All topics are addressed and questions are answered adequately. All topics are addressed, and most questions answered. One or more topics were not addressed.
Quality of Information Information clearly relates to the main topic. It includes several supporting details and/or examples. Information clearly relates to the main topic. It provides supporting details and/or examples. Information relates to the main topic. Details and examples missing. Information has little or nothing to do with the main topic.
Mechanics No grammatical, spelling or punctuation errors. Almost no grammatical, spelling or punctuation errors A few grammatical spelling, or punctuation errors. Many grammatical, spelling, or punctuation errors.
Sources All sources (information and graphics) are accurately documented in the desired format. All sources (information and graphics) are accurately documented, but a few are not in the desired format. All sources (information and graphics) are accurately documented, but many are not in the desired format. Some sources are not accurately documented.
Collaboration Students collaborate effectively. All students contribute to the document and have added a link. Excellent use of class time. Students collaborate and contribute to the document. Each student has added a link. Good use of class time. Some students may not be engaged. Not all add their own link. Off task at times during class. Students do not work well together and are off task which results in an incomplete project.
Internet Use Successfully uses suggested internet links to find information and navigates within these sites easily without assistance. Students' hyperlinks include additional relevant information for the reader. Students include more than 4. Usually able to use suggested internet links to find information and navigates within these sites easily without assistance. Students' hyperlinks include additional relevant information for the reader. Occasionally able to use suggested internet links to find information and navigates within these sites easily without assistance. Students' hyperlinks include incomplete or irrelevant information. Needs assistance or supervision to use suggested internet links and/or to navigate within these sites. Hyperlinks are missing and/or incomplete.


W–8–10
Students use a recursive process, including pre-writing, drafting, revising, editing, and critiquing to produce final drafts of written products. (Local)

W–8–1.4 Applying a format and text structure appropriate to the purpose of the writing

W–8–8
In informational writing, students demonstrate use of a range of elaboration strategies by …
• W–8–8.1 Including facts and details relevant to focus/controlling idea, and excluding extraneous information (Local)
• W–8–8.2 Including sufficient details or facts for appropriate depth of information: naming, describing, explaining, comparing, use of visual images (Local)
• W–8–8.4 Commenting on the significance of the information, when appropriate (Local)
• W–8–3.4 Organizing ideas, using transitional words/phrases and drawing a conclusion by synthesizing information (e.g., demonstrate a connection to the broader world of ideas) (Local)

Name: ____________________ Sec.:____ Date:__________________________

Perspectives – Culminating Project – Posted to Wikispaces

As part of our study of WWII, the bombing of Hiroshima, and Farewell to Manzanar, you will be completing a culminating project that includes aspects from English and Social Studies. In this culminating project, we will focus on “perspectives,” and look at the elements of WWII (especially the Pacific Theatre) and Farewell to Manzanar to have a better understanding of key figures in history, as well as citizens of both Japan and the United States. In doing so, we hope to increase our understanding of not only the time period, but how the people living during this period viewed these events.

In order to unify information from each class, we will have you work in pairs to create an ABC book PowerPoint presentation that will be uploaded to our wikispace. To begin, you will sift through information from each class, choosing the important points that you feel warrant merit on the ‘big screen’. Since this is a collaborative document, you will be able to work on it outside of class using the wikispaces discussion area to exchange ideas, as well as being able to edit the PowerPoint and re-upload as needed. Once complete, other classmates, teachers, and administrators will be able to see your work, and you can also invite your parents to view the finished product on-line.

Even though you have the authority to choose which topics you would like to cover, a balance of topics is required. We are looking for connections between the two subject areas; 15 out of 20 slides should not all relate to your history information or be about the atomic bomb, etc. Balance is essential. We are looking to see how you relate the ideas of the Pacific Theatre and the events in Farewell to Manzanar.

In order to choose events for your PowerPoint, you will be required to match up five figures, five events, three perspectives, three geographic locations, and four choices to various letters of the alphabet:
A: Atomic Bomb

Once your events/figures etc. have been chosen, it is your task to do a bit of explanation. You will create a PowerPoint that will contain slides for twenty (20) letters of the alphabet. Each page of your power point should contain some key elements of information (see next page). Three (3) of the twenty (20) topics will be expanded upon. This means that, of your twenty topics, you must chose three which you feel to be most important and explain them in greater detail. The rest of your topics will require general information and description.



Rules: In order to complete your ABC Book, you must include the following elements:

• 20 slides (choose the letters of your liking)
• 4 slides should reference key figures within your WWII and Manzanar units
• 5 slides should reference key events.
• 4 slides should reference perspectives.
• 3 slides should reference geographic locations.
• 4 slides may reference elements of your choice. (You may also include information you learned about in science class.)

Of these 20 slides, you must choose three topics to cover in more depth. While each “letter” should take up one slide, these three “letters” should take up two to three.

Your choice of which three “letters” to cover in depth should be based on their relevance to the unit of History and study of WWII. For example, you may want to focus on the perspective of the American military as opposed to the type of planes they used to drop firebombs. The effectiveness/importance of each slide will be taken into consideration during your grading.

Each slide should include the following:

• 17 slides will include a summary of information on your topic = one slide each.
(Fifteen (15) of these should include a picture; please do not include more than two pictures per slide. You may use your picture as the background if it is clear and does not interfere with the written information.

• 3 slides will cover a topic more in depth = two – three slides.
Each of these slides will include two pictures and a sound bite or video.

Notes: While you may include pictures you find on the Internet in your PowerPoint, you must provide the source for each image and/or sound bite/video (if appropriate). Most pictures on-line are copyrighted, and it is vital that you include the source for your information. There are sites that have “free-to-use” pictures. (Link to follow.) This goes for any information that you take directly from the web. YOU CANNOT JUST CUT AND PASTE INFORMATION FROM THE INTERNET INTO YOUR PRESENTATION. This is plagiarism, and you will receive a ZERO for the project. While some of your pages may include researched information, your summaries should include information that you have gleaned in class.

You may also use original drawings in your PowerPoint by scanning them into your presentation. (Mrs. Zannella can help with this.)

Differentiation: In the past, we have lowered the number of slides some of our struggling students have been required to do. For example, for this assignment, we may only require them to do 15 slides instead of 20. Also, more capable students could attempt doing all 26 letters of the alphabet. Additionally, the choice allowed in this assignment helps all students to succeed as we are directing them to show what they know most about and are most interested in.

Name: __________________________ Sec._____ Date:______________________

Letter Brief summary of key points/information. Category
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M


Letter Brief Summary of key points/information. Category
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
W
X
Y
Z


Notes Page
Use this page to record important information for your more in-depth slides.


Letter: _____________

Include the following: Who? What? Where? When? Why? and How?

Key People involved / Perspective(s):
________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________

Key Points of information:
________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________

Where and when did the event take place? Or, if writing about a person, dates of birth and death, date he or she contributed to or executed a particular action.
_______________________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________

Other pertinent information:
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________


Research Report : ABC Book


CATEGORY 4 3 2 1
Project Components PowerPoint includes all the required components as stated (events, key figures, perspectives, locations, and choice.) Table of Contents is included and accurate. Cover slide is appealing and includes an interesting title. PowerPoint includes all the required number of slides in each category (events, key figures, perspectives, locations, and choice.) Table of Contents is included and accurate. Cover slide is appealing and includes an effective title. Presentation includes the majority of the required components and/or the number of slides in each category is incorrect. Table of Contents is included but may be inaccurate. Cover slide is present and includes a title. Does not include the required number of slides and does not complete the required number in each category or lacks a specific category. Lack Table of Contents. Cover slide or title is missing.
Presentation Arrangement of slides and slide content enhances the presentation. Text, color, graphics, and sound enhance content. Arrangement of slides and slide content is appropriate. Text, color, graphics, and sound are appropriate for content. Arrangement of slide content is somewhat hard to follow. Text, color, graphics, and sound confuse the viewer or detract from content. Arrangement of slide content is ineffective or uninteresting. Text, color, graphics, and sound are lacking or detract from presentation.
Content The content of each slide is completely relevant and accurate; excellent choice of topics. Longer slides include depth of information and are well-chosen. The content of each slide is relevant and include few inaccuracies; good choice of topics. Longer slides include depth of information and are appropriate. The content of each slide may include irrelevant information and/or inaccuracies; fair choice of topics. Longer slides may not include enough information. The content of many slides includes irrelevant or inaccurate information; poor choice of topics. Longer slides may be missing or not contain enough information.
Grammar/Conventions Excellent. Minor errors. Good. Few errors. Fair. Several errors. Poor. Many errors.
Sources All researched information and pictures are cited on the slide or on a list at the end of presentation. All researched information and pictures are cited on the slide or on a list at the end of presentation. Some information and/or pictures may not include links or source. Sources missing



State GLEs addressed:

W–8–10
Students use a recursive process, including pre-writing, drafting, revising, editing, and critiquing to produce final drafts of written products. (Local)

W–8–1.4 Applying a format and text structure appropriate to the purpose of the writing

W–8–8
In informational writing, students demonstrate use of a range of elaboration strategies by …
• W–8–8.1 Including facts and details relevant to focus/controlling idea, and excluding extraneous information (Local)
• W–8–8.2 Including sufficient details or facts for appropriate depth of information: naming, describing, explaining, comparing, use of visual images (Local)
• W–8–8.4 Commenting on the significance of the information, when appropriate (Local)
• W–8–3.4 Organizing ideas, using transitional words/phrases and drawing a conclusion by synthesizing information (e.g., demonstrate a connection to the broader world of ideas) (Local)

miggity said...

There is some more material that didn't make the format here. Check out the wiki for all the 411.

Final Project

Does Disabled Mean Not Able?
A Look at Success with Disabilities

Students who are completing this assignment have resource support built into their schedule. All students, needless to say, have a disability and an IEP. This comprehensive, semester long project will require students to look at a disability, write a biography on a famous person with a disability and examine the source credibility of wikipedia and other web resources. NOTE: Students can, but are not required to, complete the research on their own disability. The option is essential to ensure student confidentiality.

BACKGROUND
Students typically have resource support built into their schedule every other day. Students are supposed to bring work and be prepared to ask questions, as needed, with their class work. Ironically, students with disabilities typically have less organizational skills, increased distractibility and apathy as well as depressed academic skills. This project serves two purposes: first, to provide students with motivation to work through their disabilities and second, to be an alternative for students who do not have work. The timeline for this project is built in the regular time of a classroom but that would not work with the design of this class. Students will have the flexibility to work on this project throughout the semester.

Students will:
Write a wiki biography about a celebrity that has a disability
Write a wiki research essay about a disability
Post a journal reflection to a blog that is written from the celebs point of view
Create a podcast of a mock interview with the celeb
Create a Venn diagram comparing/ contrasting facts that are found on the web vs. wikipedia

NOTE: It is difficult to provide a time in which these lessons will be complete, given the students abilities. The work will also be completed as time allows. Students will be working on assignments from other classes that have priority.


The following websites are just a few that showcase famous people of history/ celebrities that have (or had) a disability:
www.ldonline.org/article/5938 (Complete a celebrity quiz)
www.familyvillage.wisc.edu/general/famous.html
www.thelinkto.org/parentmentor/celebrities_w_disabilities.html

Student Learner Expectations
1. Communication[
2. Critical Thinking, Problem Solving
3. Technology

Applied Learning Standards
1. A2a & c: Communication Tools and Techniques
2. A3a & c: Information Tools and Techniques
3. A4a, b & c: Learning and Self-Management Tools and Techniques

GSE’s
W – 10 – 9.5: In independent writing, students demonstrate command of appropriate English conventions by applying conventional and word-derivative spelling patterns/rules.
W – 10 – 9: In independent writing, students demonstrate command of appropriate English conventions.
W – 10 – 3.2: In response to literary or informational text, students make and support analytical judgments about text by making inferences about the relationship(s) among content, events, characters, setting, theme, or author’s craft.
R–10–17: Demonstrates participation in a literate community.
OC–10–2: In oral communication, students make oral presentations by exhibiting logical organization and language use, appropriate to audience, context, and purpose; including smooth transitions and a supporting thesis with well-chosen details using speaking rate, volume, articulation, enunciation, pronunciation, inflection, intonation, and rhythm to communicate ideas effectively; and providing a coherent conclusion and using tools of technology to enhance message.
VA – 10 – C2.1: Using media, techniques, tools, and processes with evidence of skill, craftsmanship and personalization to communicate meaning.

Lesson One
This is the only lesson that will be completed whole class.

Goal: Students will understand that people with disabilities can succeed, become famous and contribute significantly to society.

Materials: Light bulbs, Beatles CD, a pair of very dark sunglasses, a rubber ear, and a picture of Mork from Ork. (These materials were chosen to induce interest- any associated with celebs will do). These materials are associated with Robin Williams, van Gogh, Stevie Wonder, John Lennon and Thomas Edison.

Take out two items and ask students what they might have in common. Introduce one prop at a time, asking the same question.

Guide students, if they are unable to get there on their own, to the fact that each of these props represents someone famous that also has a disability.

Students will begin the project with a ten minute brainstorm of all the different types of disabilities that they can think of. Also, according to Woonsocket’s census report sheet, students will look at the list of qualifying disabilities for special education services.

Lesson Two

Goal: Students will gather biographical information on a celebrity with a disability and write an essay.

Students will visit the websites listed above and choose a celebrity with a disability. Students will then begin to write an essay about the life of the individual. The student should follow the MLA format for citation and the conventions of writing an essay. The resource teacher will assist in organizing thoughts/ ideas for development into logically sequenced paragraphs.

The essay that is written will be posted to the wiki to add to the information being built by the community.

Students can also complete the quiz found at http://www.metrokc.gov/dias/ocre/match.htm These quizzes are common on the web.

Lesson Three

Goal: Students will understand that ‘you can’t believe everything you read’.

See Handout A. This handout was created to look like it was printed from the web. Students are confronted with a bogus internet printout. It is obviously full of inaccurate information. This handout is design to launch a discussion about the validity and credibility of information on the web.

Students will now look at wikipedia and find the same information that was found on the internet about their celeb. Students will compare the biographical information they gathered from different websites with information found on wikipedia. Students will then complete the Venn diagram showing any discrepancies in the information.

Students should write any discrepancies of information on the Venn diagram in the color red to show a conflict of information.

See Appendix A

Lesson Four

Goal: Students will gather the necessary information to write an essay to be posted on the wiki.

Students will gather research and complete the chart on the chosen disability. See Appendix B. The chart will act as an outline for the research essay. For full credit, students must submit note cards with research information, a rough draft on yellow lined paper, a second rough draft on white lined paper, and a final draft typed. The typed version will be posted on the class wiki.

Note: Students should not use any information from wikipedia. The information found in this lesson will be compared to wikipedia information.

As with the biography, students must format the essay using the MLA format for citation.

See the Rubric.

Lesson Five

Goal: Students will create blog entries that demonstrate an understanding of the disability and how it can affect someone’s life.

Students will begin to create a blog that reflects the success of the celeb and how their disability impacts their work/ daily life. Students are to be creative with the writing. Students should demonstrate a working knowledge of the characteristics of the disability, the treatment/ coping and modifications needed for living with the disability and how the disability directly affects that which has made them famous. Students should make the journal reflection writing indicative of the time period in which the celeb lived.

Lesson Six

Goal: Students will create a mock interview podcast with their celebrity while demonstrating an understanding of the disability and how it affects daily life.

Students will listen to a select interview of a podcast. This podcast will be the example of the expectations for the assignment. Choose an interview that the student will find very interesting. Students will write a mock interview with the celeb. The interview must contain at least 8 questions about their life and accurately answer them. The interviewer must make the questions relevant to the person’s disability as well as their work that makes them famous. Students can be very creative and should take into account the time period in which the person lived. This should be reflected in the questions/ answers. Students will partner up with someone to create a podcast of the interview to be posted on the class wiki.

Students are required to submit a final written copy of the interview as well as the mp3.

Visit http://www.uwstout.edu/soe/profdev/podcastrubric.html for a pre-made podcast rubric.

Variations:
For those students who cannot complete an essay in a timely fashion for both the biography and disability research, students can create a PowerPoint presentation or a Photostory 3 movie. This gives students the opportunity to demonstrate the knowledge without the writing component that may overburden the student.

The number of paragraphs, facts needed, questions for the podcast interview, can be modified (decreased) to meet the needs of the individual student. This is essential in a resource room with differently abled students.

Extensions: Students can create their own quiz to give to friends modeled after http://www.metrokc.gov/dias/ocre/match.htm These quizzes can be posted on the wiki also.

Anonymous said...

Susan Tennett Adams
Grade 5/Cranston

I also posted my final, which is a poetry unit, on the wiki. I plan on incorporating some of the tools I've been exposed to in this course for poetry month next year. Take care and have a great, well-deserved summer vacation.

Leilani Coelho said...

I created a unit that includes a variety of lessons that are easy to incorporate and support the Kindergarten curriculum. The lessons are standards based and include the use of blogs, wikis, flicker, and podcasts. I wanted to create a unit that supports what I am currently teaching and could be easily incorporated. These lessons were designed to be implemented in a K-1 classroom but can be modified and used in the upper grades as well.

Lesson 1
Goal: Students will create a wiki page that is all about bugs.
Activity:

Day 1
The lesson will begin by students identifying what they know and what they want to know about bugs.(K-W-L chart) Next the teacher will explain to the class that they will be learning about bugs and creating a wiki page that is all about bugs. Categories will include parts of a bug, what bugs look like, and plants and insects working together. Throughout the unit students can create other categories as they learn about bugs such as what bugs eat and where they live.

After the class discusses what they know about bugs they will identify the parts of a typical bug (arms, legs, head etc.). A list will be created on chart paper under the heading "Bug Parts". Next, the class will observe a picture of a bug and label the parts with sticky notes. The class will find a similar picture online and upload it to flicker and label the parts using text. Once the image is labeled it will be uploaded to the class wiki page under the section parts of a bug.

Day 2
The lesson will begin by reading The Very Hungry Caterpillar by Eric Carle and discuss what the caterpillar looks like. Students will talk about the shapes and colors that they have seen on bugs (circle, oval, fat, skinny, red, green etc.)and list them on chart paper under the heading "shapes" and "colors". Next students will create a bug using kid pix and upload it to the wiki under what bugs look like. They will be directed to make sure their bugs are colorful and are made with shapes.

Day 3
Begin the lesson by asking students the following questions: "What is a garden? How many of you have one at home? What do you think they will see in a garden? Do you think there will be any insects there? What will they be doing? Why?" Explain to the students that bugs help gardens grow. Show students pictures of flowers with bees pollinating them and discuss this process. The lesson will end by reviewing what they have learned, identifying pollination-what insects get and what plants get, and adding pictures and text to the wiki page.

Extension
Writing: Sort and classify pictures of bugs and explain why they made their choices.
Social Studies: Find out from other students about the types of bugs that live in their area.
Art: Create a bug mobile

Assessment
The teacher will observe student work to make sure they meet the minimum requirements.
1. Bug pictures are colorful
2. Bug pictures are made with shapes
3. Correctly sorts bugs from non bugs and labels categories.
3. Participates during class discussion.

Lesson 2
Goal: Using Flicker students will create a slide show to teach others about ways they can help our planet.

Procedure
Activities: This lesson is one of the final lessons of a planet earth unit. Prior to this lesson students will have learned about what earth gives us, things that are hurting the earth, and discuss ways they can help. The lesson will begin by reading aloud I Love Our Earth by Bill Martin. Students will brainstorm and create a list of ways they can help planet earth. Next they will independently draw a picture and write about one way that they would like to help such as plant a tree, conserve resources, or cleaning up. The class will share their writing and figure out ways they can make their ideas happen. Students will have pictures taken as they engage in their activity. The images will get upload to flicker to create a slideshow and students will add text to describe what is going on in each picture. The final product will be a slide show about ways they help our planet. After the slide show is created students upload it to our blog and encourage others to view it by discussing it with family members and creating posters to place throughout the school.

Extensions
Art-Show earth messages in art by making a t-shirts and wearing them, making posters, writing poems and creating songs.
Writing-At the end of the unit students can write to the president, senator, governors, and other leaders to express how they feel about environmental issues.


Assessments

Exceeds Standard
Identifies one or more ways to help earth, writing is clear and descriptive, and matches the picture.


Meets Standard
Identifies at least one way to help earth, writing is easy to decipher, and matches picture.



Below Standard
Unable to identify or write about ways to help earth














Lesson 3
Goal: Students will create an "All About Me Blog."
Activity: Read aloud I Like Me by Nacy Carlson and have students fill out a questionnaire answering questions about things they like. Let students share their responses with others and then create a blog page that displays this information. They can add pictures, text, music etc. to fancy it up. After the lesson encourage students to visit out classmates blogs and add comments to their page.

Extensions
Writing-Students can respond and comment on other students’ blog pages.
Social Studies- Students can look blogs from different parts of the world and communicate with those students.

Assessment

Exceeds Standard- Writing is clear, descriptive, with no errors

Meets Standard-Writing is easy to decipher with some errors.
Below Standard-Does not attempt to write or complete project



Lesson 4
Goal: Students will create a podcast that will feature daily weather reports.
Activity: Prior to this lesson weather reporting should be modeled and created whole class. Students will practice observing the weather and writing about it in their weather journals daily. Once students are comfortable with observing and discussing the weather they will create a podcast to present their ideas. This lesson should be extended over a few weeks so that all students will be able to create a podcast and place it on their blog.

Assessment

Above the Standard- Weather report is accurate, detailed, includes weather words, cloud cover, wind, precipitation, and temperature.

Meets Standard- Weather report is accurate and includes some weather words, cloud cover and temperature.

Below Standard-Does not give accurate report of the weather.




Extensions
Art: Students can create props to assists reporters as they engage in their weather report presentation.
Writing: Students can write scripts that reporters can read as they are creating their podcast.
Math: Graph the weather

Lesson 5
Goal: To create a blog about the weather
Prior to this lesson weather reporting should be modeled by the teacher then created by the class. The class will learn what they should be looking for and how to write about the weather through the modeling. Once students are comfortable observing and reporting the weather they will begin to write about it independently in their weather journals. Students will work together to create their classblog about the weather. Once the blog is established they will upload their weather journals to the blog. Post activities include observing weather patterns, creating posts, and commenting on each others posts.

Extensions:
Social Studies: Communicate with other students around the world and compare their weather to ours.
Math: Graph the weather and estimate future forecasts

Lesson 6
Goal: The goal of this lesson is for students to become familiar with fractions.
Activity: The lesson begins by providing students with a number of objects and asking volunteers to divide the objects so that each student gets the same amount. Continue with similar examples of 1/2, 1/3 and 1/4 and encourage students to explain how they solved the problems. Introduce math words such as numerator and denominator and show examples of how to write fractions on the board. Encourage students to identify fractions as being part of a whole. To practice these skill students will draw a few objects on a whiteboard and ask color in a fraction. Example-draw 4 stars and color in 1/2. The lesson closes by discussing what they have learned and viewing an instructional video on unitedstreeming.com. After the lesson students can continue to practice these skills on illuminations.nctm.org and setting up fraction games at centers.

Assessment: Most of the assessment for this lesson is done through observations. Students should be able to identify 1/2 and 1/4 to meet the standard.
Extensions
Cooking: Make homemade playdoe and have students identify fractions/measurements.
Math: Create story problems that include fractions.

Lesson 7
Goal: Students will make their name using wordart.
This lesson is one of the first lessons educators can use when introducing students to working with computers. The lesson begins by having students write a personalized poem using the letters of their first and last name. Next the teacher will model how to type up a name and use word art to fancy it up. Students will then have the opportunity to explore the program and create their name using word art. Post activities include sharing their art and reading their poem aloud to the class.

Assessment
Exceeds the Standard-Creates name with word art and writing is clear with no mistakes

Meets Standard- Creates name with word art and writes a poem that is easy for an adult to decipher with some mistakes.

Below the Standard-Does not create name or poem.



Extensions
Writing: Students will create personalized story using their name
Technology: Create an animated storybook online